Home2

Clark’s nutcracker reportedly can carry a hundred or more pine seeds in their gular pouches, to be cached for future lunches. (Courtesy Photo / Claudie McMichael, Pixy)

On the Trails: There are many ways to carry a lunch

By Mary F. Willson For the Juneau Empire A human day-hiker usually carries a lunch in a backpack and may require a canine companion to… Continue reading

 

Waxwings perch in a hawthorne tree in a Lemon Creek yard in mid-November. (Courtesy Photo / Lisa Tourtellot)

Wild Shots: Photos of Mother Nature in Alaska

Reader-submitted photos of Southeast Alaska.

 

Despite their name, highbush cranberries aren’t actually cranberries. High bush cranberries are actually in the honeysuckle family and are closely related to elderberries. (Vivian Mork Yéilk’ / For the Capital City Weekly)

Highbush holidays: Recipes using the berries

These are some tasty ways to use those not-actually cranberries this season.

 

The Juneau-Douglas City Museum is using robots to let guests virtually explore the museum from anywhere on earth beginning in November. Here, Empire reporter Michael S. Lockett perambulates the museum with Shelby the robot on Nov. 17, 2020. (Courtesy photo / Elissa Borges)
The Juneau-Douglas City Museum is using robots to let guests virtually explore the museum from anywhere on earth beginning in November. Here, Empire reporter Michael S. Lockett perambulates the museum with Shelby the robot on Nov. 17, 2020. (Courtesy photo / Elissa Borges)
A great blue heron is about to swallow an adult Dolly Varden. (Courtesy Photo / Bob Armstrong)

On the Trails: A look at 3 different shoreline fishers

By Mary F. Willson I watched a great blue heron glide down to the shore of a pond and slowly walk along the shore in… Continue reading

A great blue heron is about to swallow an adult Dolly Varden. (Courtesy Photo / Bob Armstrong)
"The Spirit of the Valley" is Perseverance Theatre's latest play. (Courtesy Image / Perseverance Theatre)

Sense of play: New production blends message with fun

“The Spirit of the Valley,” the latest live, virtual offering from Perseverance Theatre, deftly hides its vegetables. A play geared toward younger audiences with a… Continue reading

"The Spirit of the Valley" is Perseverance Theatre's latest play. (Courtesy Image / Perseverance Theatre)
Ravens, crows and jays have the anatomical equipment for singing but they don’t use song to defend territories or attract males, as other songbirds do. (Ben Hohenstatt / Juneau Empire File)

On the Trails: Why don’t some songbirds sing?

These songbirds have no dawn choruses.

Ravens, crows and jays have the anatomical equipment for singing but they don’t use song to defend territories or attract males, as other songbirds do. (Ben Hohenstatt / Juneau Empire File)
Bunchberries grow on old stumps in Wrangell. (Vivian Faith Prescott / For the Capital City Weekly)

Planet Alaska: The bunchberry yoik

Yes, they’re photogenic, but what I like best is you can still find bunchberries to eat in October.

Bunchberries grow on old stumps in Wrangell. (Vivian Faith Prescott / For the Capital City Weekly)
In our area, beach pea and lupines, such as the ones shown in this photo, have Rhizobia nodules. These nodules are induced by the bacteria in response to chemical triggers from the plant. These bacteria can only fix nitrogen when with a suitable host. (Pixabay / Markéta Machová)

On the Trails: Digging into the underground ecosystem

It’s an ecosystem that’s not as well-studied as some others but surely has many interesting stories.

In our area, beach pea and lupines, such as the ones shown in this photo, have Rhizobia nodules. These nodules are induced by the bacteria in response to chemical triggers from the plant. These bacteria can only fix nitrogen when with a suitable host. (Pixabay / Markéta Machová)
A view of the auroras from our most recent geomagnetic storm, shot from North Douglas on Friday, Oct. 23. (Courtesy Photo / Eric Bleicher)

Wild Shots: Photos of Mother Nature in Alaska

Reader-submitted photos of Southeast Alaska.

A view of the auroras from our most recent geomagnetic storm, shot from North Douglas on Friday, Oct. 23. (Courtesy Photo / Eric Bleicher)
The Iliamna Lake monster, depicted in this illustration by Alex Wit, is often described as shark-like in appearance. (Courtesy Image / Alex Wit)

Pride of Bristol Bay: Catching the Iliamna Lake Monster

““I was skeptical. I’m not skeptical anymore.”

The Iliamna Lake monster, depicted in this illustration by Alex Wit, is often described as shark-like in appearance. (Courtesy Image / Alex Wit)
The M.J. Murdock Charitable Trust has pledged $400,000 toward work on the Sealaska Heritage Institute Arts Campus. The donation is contingent upon SHI reaching its fundraising goal, the nonprofit announced. (Peter Segall / Juneau Empire)
The M.J. Murdock Charitable Trust has pledged $400,000 toward work on the Sealaska Heritage Institute Arts Campus. The donation is contingent upon SHI reaching its fundraising goal, the nonprofit announced. (Peter Segall / Juneau Empire)
Frank Henry Kaash Katasse is the writer and director of the new play "The Spirit of the Valley." The all-ages comedy began as something like a writing exercise for Katasse's wife and kids. It's his first time writing and directing a full-length play. “This is certainly a different beast than anything I’ve ever been a part of," he said. “It’s been a really fun experience.” (Courtesy Photo)

Stage is set for all-ages comedy with a message

Thinking green and green screens factor into new play.

Frank Henry Kaash Katasse is the writer and director of the new play "The Spirit of the Valley." The all-ages comedy began as something like a writing exercise for Katasse's wife and kids. It's his first time writing and directing a full-length play. “This is certainly a different beast than anything I’ve ever been a part of," he said. “It’s been a really fun experience.” (Courtesy Photo)
This photo shows Amalga Harbor on Oct. 18. (Courtesy Photo / Judith MacBrine)

Wild Shots: Photos of Mother Nature in Alaska

Reader-submitted photos of Southeast Alaska in autumn 2020.

This photo shows Amalga Harbor on Oct. 18. (Courtesy Photo / Judith MacBrine)
An ermine emerges to look around while exploring the crevices among the roadside rocks. While its white winter coat is conspicuous now, it will help it blend in with its surroundings during winter. (Courtesy Photo /David Bergeson)

A white weasel wanders on a wintry walk

Darting in and out of the rocks was a small, white critter that quickly disappeared.

An ermine emerges to look around while exploring the crevices among the roadside rocks. While its white winter coat is conspicuous now, it will help it blend in with its surroundings during winter. (Courtesy Photo /David Bergeson)
This photo shows western bog laurel. (Courtesy Photo / Vivian Mork Yéilk’)
This photo shows western bog laurel. (Courtesy Photo / Vivian Mork Yéilk’)
This photos shows colorful bleeding tooth-fungus, sometimes called strawberries and cream (Courtesy Photo / Jos Bakker)

Fun with 3 fungal curiosities

Mystery, bleeding teeth and bird’s nest fungus.

This photos shows colorful bleeding tooth-fungus, sometimes called strawberries and cream (Courtesy Photo / Jos Bakker)
The march from the State Capitol to Mayor Bill Overstreet Park pauses for drumming and song on Saturday, Oct. 17. (Ben Hohenstatt / Juneau Empire)

See photos from the women’s march

A women’s march and rally was held Saturday, Oct. 17, in Juneau. The event was part of a national day of rallies and protests. Marchers… Continue reading

The march from the State Capitol to Mayor Bill Overstreet Park pauses for drumming and song on Saturday, Oct. 17. (Ben Hohenstatt / Juneau Empire)
A male northern flicker at Tee Harbor this year shows the red face mark of the western form and the red nape mark of the eastern form, so it may be an intergrade. (Courtesy Photo / Bob Armstrong)

Finding bright spots in the forests and meadows

These little points of brightness matter.

A male northern flicker at Tee Harbor this year shows the red face mark of the western form and the red nape mark of the eastern form, so it may be an intergrade. (Courtesy Photo / Bob Armstrong)
The Vecchi Store is a location featured in the recently released video game “Tell My Why.” The mural adorning the outside of the market was designed by Hoonah-based artist Gordon Greenwald. The game is set in a fictional Southeast Alaska village, and care was taken to realistically portray the region’s art and culture.(Courtesy Image / Xbox)
The Vecchi Store is a location featured in the recently released video game “Tell My Why.” The mural adorning the outside of the market was designed by Hoonah-based artist Gordon Greenwald. The game is set in a fictional Southeast Alaska village, and care was taken to realistically portray the region’s art and culture.(Courtesy Image / Xbox)