This photo shows the Alaska State Capitol. A commission tasked with reviewing legislative pay on Tuesday voted to raise the annual salary for Alaska lawmakers but to restrict the daily allowance lawmakers can receive. The changes will go forward unless the Legislature expressly rejects them. (Peter Segall / Juneau Empire file)

State lawmakers face proposed salary hike, allowance limits

A commission tasked with reviewing legislative pay on Tuesday voted to raise the annual salary for Alaska lawmakers but to restrict the daily allowance lawmakers… Continue reading

 

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State high court upholds voter-approved election changes

A brief order affirmed a lower court ruling from last year.

 

House Speaker Louise Stutes, R-Kodiak, gave a stern warning about decorum to members of the Alaska House of Representatives on the first day of the legislative session on Tuesday, Jan 18, 2022. Last year the Legislature was so divided it took a full regular session and four special sessions before work was completed. (Peter Segall / Juneau Empire)
House Speaker Louise Stutes, R-Kodiak, gave a stern warning about decorum to members of the Alaska House of Representatives on the first day of the legislative session on Tuesday, Jan 18, 2022. Last year the Legislature was so divided it took a full regular session and four special sessions before work was completed. (Peter Segall / Juneau Empire)
Donated blood is prepared for storage and eventual transport at the Blood Bank of Alaska's Juneau location. There is a statewide shortage of donated blood. (Ben Hohenstatt / Juneau Empire)

‘National blood crisis’ presents challenges in Alaska

Donation centers contend with COVID, weather and other disruptions as they work to stock hospitals.

Donated blood is prepared for storage and eventual transport at the Blood Bank of Alaska's Juneau location. There is a statewide shortage of donated blood. (Ben Hohenstatt / Juneau Empire)
Image via Alaska Board of Fisheries

Statewide shellfish meeting rescheduled

This comes after the board bumped back its Southeast and Yakutat shellfish meeting

Image via Alaska Board of Fisheries
Chair of the Alaska Permanent Fund Corporation Board of Trustees Craig Richards answers questions from the bicameral Legislative Budget and Audit Committee on Tuesday, Jan. 17, 2022. The committee called Richards and other members of the board to answer questions about the December firing of APFC CEO Angela Rodell, who has claimed her termination was politically motivated. (Peter Segall / Juneau Empire)
Chair of the Alaska Permanent Fund Corporation Board of Trustees Craig Richards answers questions from the bicameral Legislative Budget and Audit Committee on Tuesday, Jan. 17, 2022. The committee called Richards and other members of the board to answer questions about the December firing of APFC CEO Angela Rodell, who has claimed her termination was politically motivated. (Peter Segall / Juneau Empire)
Former Alaska lawmaker Jason Grenn holds an Alaska Division of Elections brochure explaining ranked choice voting at his office in Anchorage, Alaska, on Friday, Jan. 14, 2022. Grenn was sponsor of a ballot initiative passed by Alaska voters in 2020 that would end party primaries and send the top four vote-getters, regardless of party affiliation, to the general election, where ranked-choice voting would determine a consensus winner. The model is unique among states and viewed by supporters as a way to encourage civility and cooperation among elected officials. The Alaska Supreme Court is set to hear arguments over the system Tuesday, Jan. 18, 2022. (AP Photo / Mark Thiessen)
Former Alaska lawmaker Jason Grenn holds an Alaska Division of Elections brochure explaining ranked choice voting at his office in Anchorage, Alaska, on Friday, Jan. 14, 2022. Grenn was sponsor of a ballot initiative passed by Alaska voters in 2020 that would end party primaries and send the top four vote-getters, regardless of party affiliation, to the general election, where ranked-choice voting would determine a consensus winner. The model is unique among states and viewed by supporters as a way to encourage civility and cooperation among elected officials. The Alaska Supreme Court is set to hear arguments over the system Tuesday, Jan. 18, 2022. (AP Photo / Mark Thiessen)
In this satellite image taken by Himawari-8, a Japanese weather satellite, and released by the agency, shows an undersea volcano eruption at the Pacific nation of Tonga Saturday, Jan. 15, 2022. An undersea volcano erupted in spectacular fashion near the Pacific nation of Tonga on Saturday, sending large waves crashing across the shore and people rushing to higher ground. (Japan Meteorology Agency)

Update: Tsunami advisory canceled for Southeast Alaska

It applies to Southeast from the BC border to Cape Fairweather.

In this satellite image taken by Himawari-8, a Japanese weather satellite, and released by the agency, shows an undersea volcano eruption at the Pacific nation of Tonga Saturday, Jan. 15, 2022. An undersea volcano erupted in spectacular fashion near the Pacific nation of Tonga on Saturday, sending large waves crashing across the shore and people rushing to higher ground. (Japan Meteorology Agency)
The next session of the Alaska State Legislature will begin next week at the Capitol building in Juneau, seen here on Jan. 10, 2022, and lawmakers have already filed dozens of new bills for consideration. (Peter Segall / Juneau Empire file)
The next session of the Alaska State Legislature will begin next week at the Capitol building in Juneau, seen here on Jan. 10, 2022, and lawmakers have already filed dozens of new bills for consideration. (Peter Segall / Juneau Empire file)
Sightseeing buses and tourists are seen at a pullout popular for taking in views of North America's tallest peak, Denali, in Denali National Park and Preserve, Alaska, on Aug. 26, 2016. The U.S. Interior Department plans to use $25 million in federal infrastructure funds on a bridge project over a slumping section of the only road into Denali National Park and Preserve. Park officials have attributed the accelerated slumping to climate change, and closed about half the 92-mile park road until they can address the repairs. (AP Photo / Becky Bohrer)
Sightseeing buses and tourists are seen at a pullout popular for taking in views of North America's tallest peak, Denali, in Denali National Park and Preserve, Alaska, on Aug. 26, 2016. The U.S. Interior Department plans to use $25 million in federal infrastructure funds on a bridge project over a slumping section of the only road into Denali National Park and Preserve. Park officials have attributed the accelerated slumping to climate change, and closed about half the 92-mile park road until they can address the repairs. (AP Photo / Becky Bohrer)
Signatures for a ballot initiative to have the State of Alaska recognize the 229 federally-recognized tribal governments were submitted to Division of Elections offices in Anchorage Wednesday, Jan. 12, 2022. The campaign was able to collect 56,230 signatures - well over the minimum requirement - meaning Alaskan voters will likely see the initiative on the November ballot. (Courtesy photo / Alaskans for Better Government)
Signatures for a ballot initiative to have the State of Alaska recognize the 229 federally-recognized tribal governments were submitted to Division of Elections offices in Anchorage Wednesday, Jan. 12, 2022. The campaign was able to collect 56,230 signatures - well over the minimum requirement - meaning Alaskan voters will likely see the initiative on the November ballot. (Courtesy photo / Alaskans for Better Government)
Employees of the Alaska Department of Corrections used excessive force, failing to comply with the department’s own use of force policy, according to a report released by the state ombudsman on Monday. (Screenshot)

Report: Excessive force used in Anchorage prison

The ombudsman found the five allegations made by inmates justified, and only partially rectified.

Employees of the Alaska Department of Corrections used excessive force, failing to comply with the department’s own use of force policy, according to a report released by the state ombudsman on Monday. (Screenshot)
In this March 2020 photo, Alaska Permanent Fund Corporation Chief Executive Officer Angela Rodell speaks to the Greater Juneau Chamber of Commerce in Elizabeth Peratrovich Hall. (Ben Hohenstatt / Juneau Empire File)

Former APFC CEO says firing was politically motivated

Dunleavy denied any involvement in Angela Rodell’s removal last month

In this March 2020 photo, Alaska Permanent Fund Corporation Chief Executive Officer Angela Rodell speaks to the Greater Juneau Chamber of Commerce in Elizabeth Peratrovich Hall. (Ben Hohenstatt / Juneau Empire File)
FILE--In this undated file photo, drilling operations at the Doyon Rig 19 at the Conoco-Phillips Carbon location in the National Petroleum Reserve, Alaska, are shown. Alaska's Congressional delegation released a joint statement Tuesday condemning the Biden Administration's decision not to pursue development on the reserve, saying it would hurt the state's economy. (AP Photo/Judy Patrick, File)
FILE--In this undated file photo, drilling operations at the Doyon Rig 19 at the Conoco-Phillips Carbon location in the National Petroleum Reserve, Alaska, are shown. Alaska's Congressional delegation released a joint statement Tuesday condemning the Biden Administration's decision not to pursue development on the reserve, saying it would hurt the state's economy. (AP Photo/Judy Patrick, File)
District Attorney Angie Kemp speaks with Assembly member Wade Bryson after at September 2019 presentation for a Greater Juneau Chamber of Commerce luncheon. Kemp has been named director of the Alaska Department of Law’s Criminal Division. (Ben Hohenstatt / Juneau Empire File)

Kemp picked to head state’s Criminal Division

Department of Law is working to fill district attorney vacancy.

District Attorney Angie Kemp speaks with Assembly member Wade Bryson after at September 2019 presentation for a Greater Juneau Chamber of Commerce luncheon. Kemp has been named director of the Alaska Department of Law’s Criminal Division. (Ben Hohenstatt / Juneau Empire File)
Lawmakers will return next week to the Alaska State Capitol building, seen here on Monday, Jan. 10, 2022, for the next session of the Alaska State Legislature, but local leaders were cautious about what could be accomplished in an election year. (Peter Segall / Juneau Empire)
Lawmakers will return next week to the Alaska State Capitol building, seen here on Monday, Jan. 10, 2022, for the next session of the Alaska State Legislature, but local leaders were cautious about what could be accomplished in an election year. (Peter Segall / Juneau Empire)
State Sen. Peter Micciche fields questions from constituents during a joint chamber luncheon on Wednesday, Jan. 5, 2022 at the Kenai Chamber of Commerce and Visitor Center in Kenai, Alaska. (Ashlyn O’Hara/Peninsula Clarion)

State Senate president lays out vision for upcoming session

Micciche seeks path forward on budget, looks to pass legislation on fishing permits, alcohol regulations

State Sen. Peter Micciche fields questions from constituents during a joint chamber luncheon on Wednesday, Jan. 5, 2022 at the Kenai Chamber of Commerce and Visitor Center in Kenai, Alaska. (Ashlyn O’Hara/Peninsula Clarion)
This image available under the Creative Commons license shows the outline of the state of Alaska filled with the pattern of the state flag. The state on Thursday reported a modest population growth between April 2020 and July 2021. It’s the first time since 2016 the state has reported a population increase. (

State reports small population growth

Net migration still negative, but not as negative.

This image available under the Creative Commons license shows the outline of the state of Alaska filled with the pattern of the state flag. The state on Thursday reported a modest population growth between April 2020 and July 2021. It’s the first time since 2016 the state has reported a population increase. (
This photo provided by the U.S. Air Force/Alaska National Guard photo shows the William Miller Memorial School, larger structure top right, which is being severely eroded by the nearby Kuskokwim River in the village of Napakiak, Alaska, on Dec. 3, 2019. The school is just 64 feet (19.51 meters) from the Kuskokwim River, and it's getting closer every year. Just two years ago, the school was less than 200 feet (60.96 meters) from the river. Climate change is a contributing factor in the erosion caused by the Kuskokwim, a river that becomes an ice highway for travelers in the winter. (Airman 1st Class Emily Farnsworth, U.S. Air Force/ Alaska National Guard)

Southwest Alaska school in race with climate change for new building

BETHEL — A school that is in danger of being lost to erosion because of climate change is at the top of the state’s list… Continue reading

This photo provided by the U.S. Air Force/Alaska National Guard photo shows the William Miller Memorial School, larger structure top right, which is being severely eroded by the nearby Kuskokwim River in the village of Napakiak, Alaska, on Dec. 3, 2019. The school is just 64 feet (19.51 meters) from the Kuskokwim River, and it's getting closer every year. Just two years ago, the school was less than 200 feet (60.96 meters) from the river. Climate change is a contributing factor in the erosion caused by the Kuskokwim, a river that becomes an ice highway for travelers in the winter. (Airman 1st Class Emily Farnsworth, U.S. Air Force/ Alaska National Guard)