Columns

The author bought his bike in Wyoming this summer. It didn't come with fenders because Wyoming doesn't have water. (Jeff Lund / For the Juneau Empire)

I Went to the Woods: Fending off the cold

While biking, cool air turns cold, and cold air turns bitter.

 

“Fireweed is a gift from Tlingit Aaní,” writes Yéilk’ Vivian Mork. “In our Lingít language it’s called lóol.” (Yéilk’ Vivian Mork / For the Capital City Weekly)

Planet AlaskaTen lessons from the fireweed

Yes, I’m thinking about fireweed in the middle of winter.

 

A king salmon on a line in Southeast Alaska gets pulled toward the net. The 2020 SeaBank report calls industrial logging and climate change “double jeopardy for salmon.” 
(Courtesy Photo / Bjorn Dihle)

SalmonState: ‘Alaska’s untold secret’ — The dividends paid by Southeast Alaska’s ‘Seabank’

By Mary Catharine Martin Wild salmon. Clean water. Clean air. Carbon storage. Climate change mitigation. Tourism, commercial fisheries — and billions of dollars in economic… Continue reading

 

The Valley of 10,000 Smokes buried in ash a century after the Novarupta eruption. (Courtesy Photo / Chris Miller)
The Valley of 10,000 Smokes buried in ash a century after the Novarupta eruption. (Courtesy Photo / Chris Miller)
This photo shows a ptarmigan in snow. (Courtesy Photo / Denise Carroll)
This photo shows a ptarmigan in snow. (Courtesy Photo / Denise Carroll)
This photo shows a porcupine near Valdez. (Courtesy Photo / Ned Rozell)

Alaska Science Forum: The porcupine’s winter in slow-motion

How do porcupines survive winter? A lengthy study provides insights.

This photo shows a porcupine near Valdez. (Courtesy Photo / Ned Rozell)
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Sustainable Alaska: Humans vs. Volcanoes

We are warming the world tens of times faster than did the ancient volcanoes.

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Ellesmere Island National Park in Canada. (Courtesy Photo / Joel Barker)

Alaska Science Forum: Mummified forest tells tale of changing north

Ancient fair-weather trees suggest a very warm period in the far north

Ellesmere Island National Park in Canada. (Courtesy Photo / Joel Barker)
This July 13 photo shows a short-tailed weasel. Short-tailed weasels or ermines wear brown summer coats but white coats in winter. The animals are among the dozens of species that make up the family Mustelidae. The long, slender body form of weasels is well-suited for these predators to pursue voles and mice into narrow tunnels and tight spaces. (Courtesy Photo / Kerry Howard)
This July 13 photo shows a short-tailed weasel. Short-tailed weasels or ermines wear brown summer coats but white coats in winter. The animals are among the dozens of species that make up the family Mustelidae. The long, slender body form of weasels is well-suited for these predators to pursue voles and mice into narrow tunnels and tight spaces. (Courtesy Photo / Kerry Howard)
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Gimme a Smile: Secret Santa’s on my doorstep

It’s a holiday whodunnit.

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Prioritizing time, money, attention and energy can help create more opportunities for good experiences while preventing lingering stress from ruining those good experiences. But it's not as easy as making an resolution as the author has discovered.  (Jeff Lund / For the Juneau Empire)

I Went to the Woods: Prioritizing in 2022

I only have priorit-eyes for one focus word.

Prioritizing time, money, attention and energy can help create more opportunities for good experiences while preventing lingering stress from ruining those good experiences. But it's not as easy as making an resolution as the author has discovered.  (Jeff Lund / For the Juneau Empire)
Ryker Goddard shows how to cool off in the Southeast Alaskan forest. (Courtesy Photo / Mary Goddard)

Planet Alaska: Welcome to Ryker Camp

Southeast Alaska, through the eyes of a Tlingit child, a gift to us older humans.

Ryker Goddard shows how to cool off in the Southeast Alaskan forest. (Courtesy Photo / Mary Goddard)
A graphic shows warming of the Arctic compared to the rest of the world. The image was released as part of NOAA’s Arctic Report Card for 2021 at the American Geophysical Union Fall Meeting in New Orleans, Dec. 14, 2021.  (Courtesy Image / NOAA climate.gov)
A graphic shows warming of the Arctic compared to the rest of the world. The image was released as part of NOAA’s Arctic Report Card for 2021 at the American Geophysical Union Fall Meeting in New Orleans, Dec. 14, 2021.  (Courtesy Image / NOAA climate.gov)
The Pebble deposit lies at the headwaters of Bristol Bay, the greatest salmon fishery in the world. (Courtesy Photo / Colin Arisman)

Pride of Bristol Bay: Permanent protections in view for Bristol Bay

By Bjorn Dihle For more than two decades, those who care about Bristol Bay — the largest sockeye salmon run on the planet — have… Continue reading

The Pebble deposit lies at the headwaters of Bristol Bay, the greatest salmon fishery in the world. (Courtesy Photo / Colin Arisman)
Angela Ketah holds a bright bouquet of fresh flowers for her business, Sitka Flower & the Chocolate Moose. Angela’s dedication to her team’s wellbeing and growth has helped her lead the way through the difficulties of the pandemic, setting an example for entrepreneurs around the region. (Courtesy Photo / Lione Clare)

Resilient Peoples & Place: Sitka Flowers The Chocolate Moose is a small business growing with its team

Small businesses like Sitka Flowers The Chocolate Moose bring character to our downtown streets.

Angela Ketah holds a bright bouquet of fresh flowers for her business, Sitka Flower & the Chocolate Moose. Angela’s dedication to her team’s wellbeing and growth has helped her lead the way through the difficulties of the pandemic, setting an example for entrepreneurs around the region. (Courtesy Photo / Lione Clare)
The author with a Kenai River rainbow caught during his honeymoon in June. (Jeff Lund / for the Juneau Empire)

I Went to the Woods: It’s OK to be happy

Of course, it’s not as easy as going fishing.

The author with a Kenai River rainbow caught during his honeymoon in June. (Jeff Lund / for the Juneau Empire)
This photo shows sandhill cranes in a Southern Wisconsin field. "It’s always a big treat to see them," writes Mary F. Willson. (Courtesy Photo / J.S. Willson)

On the Trails: Visiting old home ground

By Mary F. Willson For the Juneau Empire In mid-October, I made a quick trip back to my old stomping grounds in southern Wisconsin. In… Continue reading

This photo shows sandhill cranes in a Southern Wisconsin field. "It’s always a big treat to see them," writes Mary F. Willson. (Courtesy Photo / J.S. Willson)
A bar-tailed godwit born in Alaska that undertakes one of the greatest non-stop migrations in the animal kingdom, often flying from Alaska straight to New Zealand in the fall. (Courtesy Photo / Zachary Pohlen)
A bar-tailed godwit born in Alaska that undertakes one of the greatest non-stop migrations in the animal kingdom, often flying from Alaska straight to New Zealand in the fall. (Courtesy Photo / Zachary Pohlen)
Yeilk’ Vivian Mork sits watching a sunset with nephews Timothy and Jackson Person, Wrangell. (Vivian Faith Prescott / For the Capital City Weekly)

Planet Alaska: 10 Southeast Alaskan gratitudes

Berries, arts, salmon and so much more.

Yeilk’ Vivian Mork sits watching a sunset with nephews Timothy and Jackson Person, Wrangell. (Vivian Faith Prescott / For the Capital City Weekly)
An American robin perches on a branch, with toes loosely curled. (Courtesy Photo / Bob Armstrong)

On the Trails: Why don’t birds fall off their perches?

A growing body of evidence suggests that birds have a second organ of equilibrium.

An American robin perches on a branch, with toes loosely curled. (Courtesy Photo / Bob Armstrong)