Capital City Weekly

Angela Ketah holds a bright bouquet of fresh flowers for her business, Sitka Flower & the Chocolate Moose. Angela’s dedication to her team’s wellbeing and growth has helped her lead the way through the difficulties of the pandemic, setting an example for entrepreneurs around the region. (Courtesy Photo / Lione Clare)

Resilient Peoples & Place: Sitka Flowers The Chocolate Moose is a small business growing with its team

Small businesses like Sitka Flowers The Chocolate Moose bring character to our downtown streets.

 

Wilson Valentine (right) and John Staub rehearse ahead of the Juneau Symphony’s return to in-person performances in October. Earlier this month, Christopher Koch was named music director of the symphony. He will conduct his first concert in that role in late January. (Ben Hohenstatt / Juneau Empire)

Making beautiful music together

Meet the symphony’s new music director

 

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Planet Alaska: Visiting the ancestors through glimpses of glyphs

We live in Tlingit Aaní on Kaachxaan.akw’w where our petroglyphs are a symbol of home.

 

This photo shows the cover of the 2021 edition of “Tidal Echoes.” The annual collection of Southeast Alaskan art and writing is again accepting submissions. (Courtesy photo / Tidal Echoes)

‘Tidal Echoes’ puts out the call for submissions

“Tidal Echoes” is accepting submissions now through Dec. 1.

This photo shows the cover of the 2021 edition of “Tidal Echoes.” The annual collection of Southeast Alaskan art and writing is again accepting submissions. (Courtesy photo / Tidal Echoes)
Arthur Birling (Dan Wayne) answers a phone call delivering unwelcome news during a dress rehearsal for Theatre in the Rough’s upcoming “An Inspector Calls.” (Ben Hohenstatt / Juneau Empire)
Arthur Birling (Dan Wayne) answers a phone call delivering unwelcome news during a dress rehearsal for Theatre in the Rough’s upcoming “An Inspector Calls.” (Ben Hohenstatt / Juneau Empire)
Sarah (Erin Tripp) slides a record to Carl (Jared Olin) while the two low-level NASA workers work to make the 1970s Voyager project happen in a dress rehearsal for Perseverance Theatre’s “Voyager One.” On Wednesday, organizers announced that the show has inspired a time capsule, which will be created in cooperation with arts organizations across the state. (Ben Hohenstatt / Juneau Empire)

Life imitates art

Decade-hopping play inspires time capsule effort

Sarah (Erin Tripp) slides a record to Carl (Jared Olin) while the two low-level NASA workers work to make the 1970s Voyager project happen in a dress rehearsal for Perseverance Theatre’s “Voyager One.” On Wednesday, organizers announced that the show has inspired a time capsule, which will be created in cooperation with arts organizations across the state. (Ben Hohenstatt / Juneau Empire)
Yeilk’ Vivian Mork sits watching a sunset with nephews Timothy and Jackson Person, Wrangell. (Vivian Faith Prescott / For the Capital City Weekly)

Planet Alaska: 10 Southeast Alaskan gratitudes

Berries, arts, salmon and so much more.

Yeilk’ Vivian Mork sits watching a sunset with nephews Timothy and Jackson Person, Wrangell. (Vivian Faith Prescott / For the Capital City Weekly)
Sarah (Erin Tripp) and Carl (Jared Olin) laugh while working on the Voyager project during a dress rehearsal for Perseverance Theatre's "Voyager One." The play, which is running now, is simultaneously two period pieces. One is set in the '70s, the other is in the distant future. (Ben Hohenstatt / Juneau Empire)
Sarah (Erin Tripp) and Carl (Jared Olin) laugh while working on the Voyager project during a dress rehearsal for Perseverance Theatre's "Voyager One." The play, which is running now, is simultaneously two period pieces. One is set in the '70s, the other is in the distant future. (Ben Hohenstatt / Juneau Empire)
Oscar and Kéet inspect the fresh cohos caught by Mickey Prescott. (Vivian Faith Prescott / For the Capital City Weekly)

Planet Alaska: Coho know-how

Silver skin and golden stories.

Oscar and Kéet inspect the fresh cohos caught by Mickey Prescott. (Vivian Faith Prescott / For the Capital City Weekly)
Michael Penn / Juneau Empire File 
Michelle Ward and Anthony Davidson walk their children, Kyesin, 6, left, CJ, 5, center, and Callen, 2, down Seward Street as they visit downtown merchants for Halloween 2018. This year, downtown businesses are taking a pass on trick-or-treating. However, options for spooky fun and treat gathering abound.
Michael Penn / Juneau Empire File 
Michelle Ward and Anthony Davidson walk their children, Kyesin, 6, left, CJ, 5, center, and Callen, 2, down Seward Street as they visit downtown merchants for Halloween 2018. This year, downtown businesses are taking a pass on trick-or-treating. However, options for spooky fun and treat gathering abound.
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Alan Young leads the Juneau Symphony through a Tuesday night rehearsal inside St. Paul's Catholic Church. (Ben Hohenstatt / Juneau Empire)

Together again: Juneau Symphony returns to live, in-person performances

First live performance in almost two years ushers in 59th season

Alan Young leads the Juneau Symphony through a Tuesday night rehearsal inside St. Paul's Catholic Church. (Ben Hohenstatt / Juneau Empire)
This photo shows gray currents, also called stink currants, Vivian Mork photographer. (Vivian Mork Yeilk’ / For the Capital City Weekly)

Planet Alaska: Picking currants and riding currents

We give respect and thanks to the berries and the birds as we harvest the last of the berries.

This photo shows gray currents, also called stink currants, Vivian Mork photographer. (Vivian Mork Yeilk’ / For the Capital City Weekly)
Alaska Native artists Lily Hope, left, and Stephen Qacung Blanchett, right, were selected as two of the fifteen Indigenous artists to receive $100,000 grants for upcoming projects by the Native Arts and Cultures Foundation. (Photo credit: @SydneyAkagiPhoto for Hope and Joy Denmert for Blanchett)
Alaska Native artists Lily Hope, left, and Stephen Qacung Blanchett, right, were selected as two of the fifteen Indigenous artists to receive $100,000 grants for upcoming projects by the Native Arts and Cultures Foundation. (Photo credit: @SydneyAkagiPhoto for Hope and Joy Denmert for Blanchett)
Judy Carmichael, of the Judy Carmichael Trio, greeted well-wishers and autographed merchandise at the Heritage Coffee shop’s downtown location on Oct. 1. She visited Juneau to perform as part of the Juneau Jazz & Classics Fall Festival. (Instagram)
Judy Carmichael, of the Judy Carmichael Trio, greeted well-wishers and autographed merchandise at the Heritage Coffee shop’s downtown location on Oct. 1. She visited Juneau to perform as part of the Juneau Jazz & Classics Fall Festival. (Instagram)
Veterans march in Hoonah for the raising of a totem pole honoring Southeast Akaska's Indigenous veterans. The region, and Hoonah in particular, have a high number of veterans per capita. (Courtesy Photo / Elle Weberling)

Resilient Peoples & Place: Healing in Hoonah by honoring Southeast’s Indigenous veterans

A previous version of this article incorrectly identified Louise Kane as Stanley “Steamie” Thompson’s mother. Kane was Thompson’s grandmother. The article has been updated to… Continue reading

Veterans march in Hoonah for the raising of a totem pole honoring Southeast Akaska's Indigenous veterans. The region, and Hoonah in particular, have a high number of veterans per capita. (Courtesy Photo / Elle Weberling)
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This photo shows a common loon carved by artist Matt Robus for the exhibit “Birds of Wood." It opens Friday at the Juneau Arts and Culture Center for First Friday. (Courtesy Photo)

Like a duck to water: In-person gallery shows return to the JACC

Juneau Artists Gallery kicks off sale on First Friday, too.

This photo shows a common loon carved by artist Matt Robus for the exhibit “Birds of Wood." It opens Friday at the Juneau Arts and Culture Center for First Friday. (Courtesy Photo)
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Planet Alaska: A grumble of fishermen and a squabble of seagulls

Whatever we’re called as a collective, we’re a noisy bunch.

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From left to right: Jackie Manning, curator of exhibits for the Alaska State Library, Archives and Museum; Aaron Elmore, exhibit designer, and Ellen Carrlee, conservator for the museum unpack an ancient raven's tail robe on loan from the Royal Ontario Museum in Canada. This robe is one of only about a dozen older robes in existence, according to SLAM collections curator Steven Kenrikson, and will only be on display at SLAM until next month. (Courtesy Photo/ Chelsea Kilgore, Alaska State Library Archives and Museum)
From left to right: Jackie Manning, curator of exhibits for the Alaska State Library, Archives and Museum; Aaron Elmore, exhibit designer, and Ellen Carrlee, conservator for the museum unpack an ancient raven's tail robe on loan from the Royal Ontario Museum in Canada. This robe is one of only about a dozen older robes in existence, according to SLAM collections curator Steven Kenrikson, and will only be on display at SLAM until next month. (Courtesy Photo/ Chelsea Kilgore, Alaska State Library Archives and Museum)