Alaska Outdoors

Three trumpeter Swans in peterson Creek pond by Amalga Harbor on Oct. 10. (Courtesy Photo / Kenneth Gill, gillfoto)

Wild Shots: Photos of Mother Nature in Alaska

Reader-submitted photos of Southeast Alaska in autumn 2020.

 

A raven flies in Alaska. (Courtesy Photo / Ned Rozell)

Ravens and crows are hard to fool

By Ned Rozell Biologist Stacia Backensto has fooled a raven. When trying to recapture birds on Alaska’s North Slope during her graduate student days at… Continue reading

 

Elin Lunoe, and Pilot, a Steller sea lion, check each other out at a tank at the Alaska SeaLife Center in Seward in this February 2015 photo.  The Alaska SeaLife Center is among the recipients of U.S. Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission funds. (AP Photo/Dan Joling)

SeaLife Center receives almost $300K in grant money

It was among 15 conservation organizations and state agencies awarded funds.

 

A male northern flicker at Tee Harbor this year shows the red face mark of the western form and the red nape mark of the eastern form, so it may be an intergrade. (Courtesy Photo / Bob Armstrong)

Finding bright spots in the forests and meadows

These little points of brightness matter.

A male northern flicker at Tee Harbor this year shows the red face mark of the western form and the red nape mark of the eastern form, so it may be an intergrade. (Courtesy Photo / Bob Armstrong)
A 9-year-old Carl Tape — now a seismologist at UAF’s Geophysical Institute — poses beside a thermometer registering 50 below zero Fahrenheit during a Fairbanks cold snap in January 1989. (Courtesy Photo / Walt Tape)

Cold tolerance not the same for everyone

What makes someone hot-blooded when others are cold as ice?

A 9-year-old Carl Tape — now a seismologist at UAF’s Geophysical Institute — poses beside a thermometer registering 50 below zero Fahrenheit during a Fairbanks cold snap in January 1989. (Courtesy Photo / Walt Tape)
A harlequin duck flies in front of Jeff Lund, who decided sometimes a camera is better than a shotgun for shooting when dinner has been secured. (Jeff Lund / For the Juneau Empire)

Duck, duck, jalapeno popper

To really love music, you have to at least appreciate different styles. Same goes with hunting.

A harlequin duck flies in front of Jeff Lund, who decided sometimes a camera is better than a shotgun for shooting when dinner has been secured. (Jeff Lund / For the Juneau Empire)
Arctic bristletails, like the ones shown in this photo, are wingless insects that live along the shoreline. (Courtesy Photo / Aaron Baldwin)

We’re still learning about these unusual insects

The’ve been around for 400 million years.

Arctic bristletails, like the ones shown in this photo, are wingless insects that live along the shoreline. (Courtesy Photo / Aaron Baldwin)
An Alaska yellowjacket sits among the leaves in late fall. (Courtesy Photo / Ned Rozell)

Fall equinox and the signs of the big turn

It is time for Alaskans to start paying the bill for all that summer daylight.

An Alaska yellowjacket sits among the leaves in late fall. (Courtesy Photo / Ned Rozell)
Lora Vess is an Associate Professor of Sociology and Department Chair of Social Sciences at the University of Alaska Southeast. “

Raging fires are the new normal of climate change.

Sustainable Alaska: The role of humans in ‘natural’ disasters

Lora Vess is an Associate Professor of Sociology and Department Chair of Social Sciences at the University of Alaska Southeast. “
Tia Shoemaker, hunting guide and bush pilot on the Alaska Peninsula, stands next to her family’s plane.(Courtesy Photo / Tia Shoemaker)

Pride of Bristol Bay: A conversation with a hunter and conservationist

She is fighting to ensure future generations will experience the wilderness of Bristol Bay.

Tia Shoemaker, hunting guide and bush pilot on the Alaska Peninsula, stands next to her family’s plane.(Courtesy Photo / Tia Shoemaker)

There might be goats… just over the hill

There’s always a fish or deer or quorum of widgeon that peck at you during the off season.

A bear stands in a field of hemlock parsley at Eagle Beach two years ago before the bears demolished most of the plants. (Courtesy Photo / Doug Jones)
A bear stands in a field of hemlock parsley at Eagle Beach two years ago before the bears demolished most of the plants. (Courtesy Photo / Doug Jones)
A group of people watch bears cross the road near Mendenhall Glacier Visitor Center on Sept. 16, 2020. (Courtesy Photo / Kenneth Gill, gillfoto)

Wild Shots: Photos of Mother Nature in Alaska

Reader-submitted photos for late summer 2020.

A group of people watch bears cross the road near Mendenhall Glacier Visitor Center on Sept. 16, 2020. (Courtesy Photo / Kenneth Gill, gillfoto)
The site of the Hotel Valdez, destroyed in the Great Alaska Earthquake of March 1964. (Courtesy Photo / Ned Rozell)

Earthquakes and insects on Alaska road trips

“It felt like the earth was a giant halibut, and I was the fishing pole.”

The site of the Hotel Valdez, destroyed in the Great Alaska Earthquake of March 1964. (Courtesy Photo / Ned Rozell)
University of Alaska Fairbanks researcher Ben Jones smiles during a recent interview on the Fairbanks campus. (Courtesy Photo / Ned Rozell)

Scientist finds healing in return to site of fatal crash

Ben Jones recently returned to the tundra site of a May plane crash that took the life of the pilot.

University of Alaska Fairbanks researcher Ben Jones smiles during a recent interview on the Fairbanks campus. (Courtesy Photo / Ned Rozell)
Thanks to writer John Gierach, Jeff Lund has discovered a love for brown trout, bamboo fly rods and Colorado’s Frying Pan river. (Jeff Lund / For the Juneau Empire)

Appreciating a legend while he’s still around

Things like fly fishing are endless springs of inspiration if you do them right.

Thanks to writer John Gierach, Jeff Lund has discovered a love for brown trout, bamboo fly rods and Colorado’s Frying Pan river. (Jeff Lund / For the Juneau Empire)
This photo shows a fly infected by Cordyceps entomopathogenic fungus. There are many hijackers in the animal kingdom and some parasites alter the behavior of their hosts. (Courtesy Photo / Alejandro Santillana)
This photo shows a fly infected by Cordyceps entomopathogenic fungus. There are many hijackers in the animal kingdom and some parasites alter the behavior of their hosts. (Courtesy Photo / Alejandro Santillana)