Alaska Outdoors

A seal contorts into a yoga-like pose. (Courtesy Photo / Virginia Kelly)

Wild Shots: Photos of Mother Nature in Alaska

Reader-submitted photos of Southeast Alaska.

 

This photo shows a wolf in Yukon-Charley Rivers National Park and Preserve(Courtesy Photo / Mathew Sorum)

Alaska Science Forum: Wolf-virus study shows the virtue of space

Scientists find wolves with adequate social distancing from humans tend to avoid nasty viruses.

 

The vivid colors of male bluebirds result from structural features in the feather barbs, and males with more vivid colors father more chicks, with their own mates or with other females. (Courtesy Photo / Kerry Howard)

On the Trails: Tree sparrows and bluebirds

By Mary F. Willson For the Juneau Empire In the early part of April, there were sometimes two dozen mallards on my mostly icy home… Continue reading

 

In Ferry, Alaska, a balsam poplar leaf emerges from a bud in May. (Courtesy Photo / Ned Rozell)

Alaska Science Forum: Greenup unfolds, pollen soon to follow

The great, silent collective explosion of freed tree buds is coming.

In Ferry, Alaska, a balsam poplar leaf emerges from a bud in May. (Courtesy Photo / Ned Rozell)
Mary Beth Schoen admires a large-tree old-growth stand in Saook Bay on northeastern Baranof Island. Some individual trees were over six feet in diameter and many centuries old. This riparian area was adjacent to a salmon stream and was full of bear trails. Large-tree old growth stands are rare on the Tongass. (Courtesy Photo / John Schoen)

‘Tongass Odyssey’ explores decades of research, politics and change

“I wrote it because I feel it’s important to get this message out.”

Mary Beth Schoen admires a large-tree old-growth stand in Saook Bay on northeastern Baranof Island. Some individual trees were over six feet in diameter and many centuries old. This riparian area was adjacent to a salmon stream and was full of bear trails. Large-tree old growth stands are rare on the Tongass. (Courtesy Photo / John Schoen)
Good action spotted on a Grizzly Safaris trip. (Courtesy Photo / Grizzly Safaris)
Good action spotted on a Grizzly Safaris trip. (Courtesy Photo / Grizzly Safaris)
Gray-crowned rosy-finches visited our wetlands in April, on their way to alpine nesting areas. (Courtesy Photo / Kerry Howard)

On The Trails: Finding rosy-finches and some excitement

After a long lonely stroll, I finally spotted my birds

Gray-crowned rosy-finches visited our wetlands in April, on their way to alpine nesting areas. (Courtesy Photo / Kerry Howard)
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Wolf tracks on a winter trail not far from Fairbanks. (Courtesy Photo / Ned Rozell)

Alaska Science Forum: Spring arrives on final cabin trip

As we skied along a packed ribbon of snow, the wolf tracks were a surprise.

Wolf tracks on a winter trail not far from Fairbanks. (Courtesy Photo / Ned Rozell)
This photo shows the author's first steelhead of the spring. It was the perfect shot and the perfect start for the long-awaited spring.  (Jeff Lund / For the Juneau Empire)

I Went To The Woods: Spring —and steelhead fishing —are finally here

Winter-spring transition was like the never-ending YouTube ads that keep good stuff from starting.

This photo shows the author's first steelhead of the spring. It was the perfect shot and the perfect start for the long-awaited spring.  (Jeff Lund / For the Juneau Empire)
Voles have short ears and small eyes, and shorter tails than mice do. This vole was caught by an incoming high tide and had to swim for safety. (Courtesy Photo / Bob Armstrong)

On The Trails: Setting the record straight on voles

Vole-riety is not the mice of life.

Voles have short ears and small eyes, and shorter tails than mice do. This vole was caught by an incoming high tide and had to swim for safety. (Courtesy Photo / Bob Armstrong)
The Alsek River is the straight, tan waterway with a major branch that turns left into Alsek Lake. As the Grand Plateau Glacier — near top left of the photo — recedes, scientists think the Alsek River will flow that way to the sea. Currently, the Alsek River hangs a sharp right to reach Dry Bay and the Gulf of Alaska. (Courtesy Photo /Chris Larsen)

Alaska Science Forum: Big change on a big landscape

Could a roving river re-route rafters ?

The Alsek River is the straight, tan waterway with a major branch that turns left into Alsek Lake. As the Grand Plateau Glacier — near top left of the photo — recedes, scientists think the Alsek River will flow that way to the sea. Currently, the Alsek River hangs a sharp right to reach Dry Bay and the Gulf of Alaska. (Courtesy Photo /Chris Larsen)
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April is usually the author’s favorite month for steelhead fishing. If the weather and fish, cooperate. (Jeff Lund / For the Juneau Empire)
April is usually the author’s favorite month for steelhead fishing. If the weather and fish, cooperate. (Jeff Lund / For the Juneau Empire)
A marbled godwit has winkled a lugworm out of its burrow in the sediments. (Courtesy Photo / Bob Armstrong)

On The Trails: Mudflats at low tide

A walk on a gray, March day turned out to be more interesting than expected.

A marbled godwit has winkled a lugworm out of its burrow in the sediments. (Courtesy Photo / Bob Armstrong)
The beak of a female white-winged crossbill. This one died when it flew into a window. (Courtesy Photo / Ned Rozell)
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Alaska Science Forum: White-winged crossbills and yellow snow

Why might songbirds have a thing for yellow snow?

The beak of a female white-winged crossbill. This one died when it flew into a window. (Courtesy Photo / Ned Rozell)
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Trumpeter swans also appeared in a small patch of open water on Mendenhall Lake, a few days after equinox. (Courtesy Photo / Kerry Howard)

On The Trails: Eagle Beach at equinox time

Wildlife spotted on the water and in the sand.

Trumpeter swans also appeared in a small patch of open water on Mendenhall Lake, a few days after equinox. (Courtesy Photo / Kerry Howard)
Even with their nest covered in snow the eagles are making improvements. (Courtesy Photo / Jos Bakker)

Wild Shots: Photos of Mother Nature in Alaska

Reader-submitted photos of Southeast Alaska.

Even with their nest covered in snow the eagles are making improvements. (Courtesy Photo / Jos Bakker)
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Juneau’s Climate Change Solutionists: Growing renewable energy supplies with Duff Mitchell

If we are to keep global warming below 1.5 degrees Celsius, we must electrify everything.

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The author and Fairbanks resident Harrison Gottschling return to the truck after taking a caribou in the interior over spring break last week. (Jeff Lund / For the Juneau Empire)

I Went to the Woods: Cold weather caribou

I had been cold before, but not this type of cold.

The author and Fairbanks resident Harrison Gottschling return to the truck after taking a caribou in the interior over spring break last week. (Jeff Lund / For the Juneau Empire)