Science

Ned Rozell holds a shard of ice crust, one-inch thick, that lurks in the middle of the Fairbanks snowpack. (Courtesy Photo / Kristen Rozell)

Midwinter rain-on-snow a game changer

A few hours of a December day may affect living things for years to come in the middle of Alaska.

 

The Valley of 10,000 Smokes buried in ash a century after the Novarupta eruption. (Courtesy Photo / Chris Miller)
The Valley of 10,000 Smokes buried in ash a century after the Novarupta eruption. (Courtesy Photo / Chris Miller)
This photo shows a ptarmigan in snow. (Courtesy Photo / Denise Carroll)
This photo shows a ptarmigan in snow. (Courtesy Photo / Denise Carroll)
This photo shows a porcupine near Valdez. (Courtesy Photo / Ned Rozell)

Alaska Science Forum: The porcupine’s winter in slow-motion

How do porcupines survive winter? A lengthy study provides insights.

This photo shows a porcupine near Valdez. (Courtesy Photo / Ned Rozell)
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Sustainable Alaska: Humans vs. Volcanoes

We are warming the world tens of times faster than did the ancient volcanoes.

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A kingfisher’s diving sequence: a headfirst plunge with wings folded, splash, airborne again. (Courtesy Photo / Bob Armstrong)
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On the Trails: Diving into birds underwater

There’s a lot going on under the surface.

A kingfisher’s diving sequence: a headfirst plunge with wings folded, splash, airborne again. (Courtesy Photo / Bob Armstrong)
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Ellesmere Island National Park in Canada. (Courtesy Photo / Joel Barker)

Alaska Science Forum: Mummified forest tells tale of changing north

Ancient fair-weather trees suggest a very warm period in the far north

Ellesmere Island National Park in Canada. (Courtesy Photo / Joel Barker)
This July 13 photo shows a short-tailed weasel. Short-tailed weasels or ermines wear brown summer coats but white coats in winter. The animals are among the dozens of species that make up the family Mustelidae. The long, slender body form of weasels is well-suited for these predators to pursue voles and mice into narrow tunnels and tight spaces. (Courtesy Photo / Kerry Howard)
This July 13 photo shows a short-tailed weasel. Short-tailed weasels or ermines wear brown summer coats but white coats in winter. The animals are among the dozens of species that make up the family Mustelidae. The long, slender body form of weasels is well-suited for these predators to pursue voles and mice into narrow tunnels and tight spaces. (Courtesy Photo / Kerry Howard)
Voles left several trackways at the edge of the wetlands; a tail-drag mark shows behind the foot marks. (Courtesy Photo / David Bergeson)
Voles left several trackways at the edge of the wetlands; a tail-drag mark shows behind the foot marks. (Courtesy Photo / David Bergeson)
A graphic shows warming of the Arctic compared to the rest of the world. The image was released as part of NOAA’s Arctic Report Card for 2021 at the American Geophysical Union Fall Meeting in New Orleans, Dec. 14, 2021.  (Courtesy Image / NOAA climate.gov)
A graphic shows warming of the Arctic compared to the rest of the world. The image was released as part of NOAA’s Arctic Report Card for 2021 at the American Geophysical Union Fall Meeting in New Orleans, Dec. 14, 2021.  (Courtesy Image / NOAA climate.gov)
This photo available under the Creative Commons license shows a New Mexico whiptail. The lizards are obligately parthenogenetic(capable of reproduction without fertilization) and unisexual (female). (Courtesy Photo / Greg Schechter)

On the Trails: Parthenogenesis in vertebrates

There’s another way to be a single parent.

This photo available under the Creative Commons license shows a New Mexico whiptail. The lizards are obligately parthenogenetic(capable of reproduction without fertilization) and unisexual (female). (Courtesy Photo / Greg Schechter)
A forest growing on Malaspina Glacier in southern Alaska. (Courtesy Photo / Martin Truffer)
A forest growing on Malaspina Glacier in southern Alaska. (Courtesy Photo / Martin Truffer)
This photo shows a raven in the snow. (Courtesy Photo / Kerry Howard)

On the Trails: Transition to winter — maybe

A mat of old leaves lined the roadway, each leaf fringed with crystals, making a pretty mosaic…

This photo shows a raven in the snow. (Courtesy Photo / Kerry Howard)
The egg mass under the tipped up shell is indicated by A, and the head of the male sculpin by B. (Courtesy Photo / John Palmes)

On the Trails: Caring for offspring

Vertebrates have a broad spectrum of ways to care for their offspring

The egg mass under the tipped up shell is indicated by A, and the head of the male sculpin by B. (Courtesy Photo / John Palmes)
Killer whales in the Gulf of Alaska. (Courtesy Photo / North Gulf Oceanic Society, NMFS research permit 20341)

Alaska Science Forum: Listening to the voices of killer whales

By Ned Rozell In the deep blue ocean just off the coast of Alaska, killer whales are now communicating with one another with clicks and… Continue reading

Killer whales in the Gulf of Alaska. (Courtesy Photo / North Gulf Oceanic Society, NMFS research permit 20341)
Fairbanks City Transit System No. 142 of “Into the Wild” fame inside the engineering building on the UAF campus, where UA Museum of the North conservators will work on its preservation. (Courtesy Photo / Ned Rozell)
Fairbanks City Transit System No. 142 of “Into the Wild” fame inside the engineering building on the UAF campus, where UA Museum of the North conservators will work on its preservation. (Courtesy Photo / Ned Rozell)
This photo shows a wall of permafrost ice in a bank of the Itkillik River in northern Alaska.(Courtesy Photo / Eva Stephani)

Alaska Science Forum: Far-north permafrost cliff is one of a kind

An amphitheater of frozen ground thaws where a northern river cuts into it, exposing walls of ice.

This photo shows a wall of permafrost ice in a bank of the Itkillik River in northern Alaska.(Courtesy Photo / Eva Stephani)
Tone and Charles Deehr in Fairbanks, October 2021. Both photos courtesy Charles Deehr. 3. (Courtesy Photo / Charles Deehr)

Alaska Science Forum: Red aurora rare enough to be special

In decades of sky-watching in the north, he has seen a few red auroras, but not many.

Tone and Charles Deehr in Fairbanks, October 2021. Both photos courtesy Charles Deehr. 3. (Courtesy Photo / Charles Deehr)