Science

Glacial retreat will create thousands of miles of new salmon habitat by 2100 — which means, scientists say, that managers need to be thinking proactively about how to manage that land. Pictured is a king salmon on a Southeast Alaska shore. (Mary Catharine Martin / SalmonState)
Glacial retreat will create thousands of miles of new salmon habitat by 2100 — which means, scientists say, that managers need to be thinking proactively about how to manage that land. Pictured is a king salmon on a Southeast Alaska shore. (Mary Catharine Martin / SalmonState)
John Gaedeke’s lodge overlooks Iniakuk Lake in the Brooks Range, where his permafrost-stabilized beers and sodas do not freeze. (Courtesy Photo / John Gaedeke)

Alaska Science Forum: Ninety below zero and the unfrozen beer

“How the heck is that possible?”

John Gaedeke’s lodge overlooks Iniakuk Lake in the Brooks Range, where his permafrost-stabilized beers and sodas do not freeze. (Courtesy Photo / John Gaedeke)
Charmaine Robinson is an assistant professor of science at the University of Alaska Southeast and lives in Ketchikan. (Courtesy Photo)

Sustainable Alaska: Cultivating a sustainable mind

We need to cultivate a sense of calm by reducing stress and fear in our lives.

Charmaine Robinson is an assistant professor of science at the University of Alaska Southeast and lives in Ketchikan. (Courtesy Photo)
An American coot spent time in Auke Bay this winter, farther north than usual. (Courtesy Photo / Kerry Howard)

On the Trails: Three winter surprises

Regular bird-watchers spotted an unusual bird in Auke Bay this winter…

An American coot spent time in Auke Bay this winter, farther north than usual. (Courtesy Photo / Kerry Howard)
A bull caribou from the Fortymile herd as seen from a camera around the neck of a female caribou. Still image from a nine-second video the collar captured during a study of the herd using cameras that dropped to the ground in autumn. I(Courtesy Image /Libby Ehlers)
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Alaska Science Forum: Secret lives of caribou caught on camera

Cams gave biologists who teamed up from several agencies a new look at the Fortymile herd.

A bull caribou from the Fortymile herd as seen from a camera around the neck of a female caribou. Still image from a nine-second video the collar captured during a study of the herd using cameras that dropped to the ground in autumn. I(Courtesy Image /Libby Ehlers)
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This photo available under a Creative Commons license shows a hooded pitohui (Pitohui dichrous) YUS Conservation area on the Huon Peninsula, Morobe Province, Papua New Guinea. (Courtesy Photo / Wikimedia)

On the Trails: Toxic birds and bugs

These chemical compounds are often derived from plants

This photo available under a Creative Commons license shows a hooded pitohui (Pitohui dichrous) YUS Conservation area on the Huon Peninsula, Morobe Province, Papua New Guinea. (Courtesy Photo / Wikimedia)
Vladimir Alexeev in Norway while teaching summer school in 2017. Alexeev is a climate scientist who recently worked with local composer Michael Bucy to create a song about climate change. (Courtesy photo/Vishnu Nandan)
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Sounding a warning

Local composer writes song about climate change

Vladimir Alexeev in Norway while teaching summer school in 2017. Alexeev is a climate scientist who recently worked with local composer Michael Bucy to create a song about climate change. (Courtesy photo/Vishnu Nandan)
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Killdeer chicks have just one black breast band at first, but soon get the characteristic two bands.(Courtesy Photo / Bob Armstrong)
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On the Tails: Shorebirds in winter

Sightings are no “shore” thing.

Killdeer chicks have just one black breast band at first, but soon get the characteristic two bands.(Courtesy Photo / Bob Armstrong)
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Alaska Science Forum: Fun with ice physics in the cryosphere

Here’s why some found recent winter weather fascinating.

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A gull looks for dislodged food in the surf. (Courtesy Photo / Bob Armstrong)
A gull looks for dislodged food in the surf. (Courtesy Photo / Bob Armstrong)
This photo shows a glacier bear walking along rocky terrain. There are four known populations of black bears in Southeast Alaska that include the lighter-colored bears, said Tania Lewis, a wildlife biologist for the National Park Service at Glacier Bay National Park and Preserve. (Courtesy Photo / Tom Hausler)
This photo shows a glacier bear walking along rocky terrain. There are four known populations of black bears in Southeast Alaska that include the lighter-colored bears, said Tania Lewis, a wildlife biologist for the National Park Service at Glacier Bay National Park and Preserve. (Courtesy Photo / Tom Hausler)
Ned Rozell holds a shard of ice crust, one-inch thick, that lurks in the middle of the Fairbanks snowpack. (Courtesy Photo / Kristen Rozell)

Midwinter rain-on-snow a game changer

A few hours of a December day may affect living things for years to come in the middle of Alaska.

Ned Rozell holds a shard of ice crust, one-inch thick, that lurks in the middle of the Fairbanks snowpack. (Courtesy Photo / Kristen Rozell)
The Valley of 10,000 Smokes buried in ash a century after the Novarupta eruption. (Courtesy Photo / Chris Miller)
The Valley of 10,000 Smokes buried in ash a century after the Novarupta eruption. (Courtesy Photo / Chris Miller)
This photo shows a ptarmigan in snow. (Courtesy Photo / Denise Carroll)

On the Trails: Strolling on the snow

Snow, and more snow!

This photo shows a ptarmigan in snow. (Courtesy Photo / Denise Carroll)
This photo shows a porcupine near Valdez. (Courtesy Photo / Ned Rozell)

Alaska Science Forum: The porcupine’s winter in slow-motion

How do porcupines survive winter? A lengthy study provides insights.

This photo shows a porcupine near Valdez. (Courtesy Photo / Ned Rozell)
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Sustainable Alaska: Humans vs. Volcanoes

We are warming the world tens of times faster than did the ancient volcanoes.

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A kingfisher’s diving sequence: a headfirst plunge with wings folded, splash, airborne again. (Courtesy Photo / Bob Armstrong)
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On the Trails: Diving into birds underwater

There’s a lot going on under the surface.

A kingfisher’s diving sequence: a headfirst plunge with wings folded, splash, airborne again. (Courtesy Photo / Bob Armstrong)
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Ellesmere Island National Park in Canada. (Courtesy Photo / Joel Barker)

Alaska Science Forum: Mummified forest tells tale of changing north

Ancient fair-weather trees suggest a very warm period in the far north

Ellesmere Island National Park in Canada. (Courtesy Photo / Joel Barker)
This July 13 photo shows a short-tailed weasel. Short-tailed weasels or ermines wear brown summer coats but white coats in winter. The animals are among the dozens of species that make up the family Mustelidae. The long, slender body form of weasels is well-suited for these predators to pursue voles and mice into narrow tunnels and tight spaces. (Courtesy Photo / Kerry Howard)

On the Trails: The weasel family

Flexing our mustelids.

This July 13 photo shows a short-tailed weasel. Short-tailed weasels or ermines wear brown summer coats but white coats in winter. The animals are among the dozens of species that make up the family Mustelidae. The long, slender body form of weasels is well-suited for these predators to pursue voles and mice into narrow tunnels and tight spaces. (Courtesy Photo / Kerry Howard)
Voles left several trackways at the edge of the wetlands; a tail-drag mark shows behind the foot marks. (Courtesy Photo / David Bergeson)

On the Trails: Observations from four wintry walks

Plenty of creatures stirring.

Voles left several trackways at the edge of the wetlands; a tail-drag mark shows behind the foot marks. (Courtesy Photo / David Bergeson)