Alaska Natives

People work together to raise the Xa’Kooch story pole, which commemorates the Battle of the Inian Islands. (Shaelene Grace Moler / For the Capital City Weekly)

Resilient Peoples & Place: The Xa’Kooch story pole — one step toward a journey of healing

“This pole is for the Chookaneidi, but here among us, many clans are represented…”

 

Attendees of a government-to-government consultation look on as kuspuks were displayed during the Violence Against Women Tribal Consultation held this week in Anchorage. (Courtesy Photo / Lisa Houghton)

Top Justice Dept. official reflects on Alaska’s unique concerns

Help for Juneau tribal court, emergency rural services may result from aid touted at Anchorge summit

 

Seadrone photo showing stone fish trap found in Shakan Bay on the west side of Prince of Wales could potentially be oldest ever found in the world. The structure was first discovered in 2010 and officially confirmed as a stone weir earlier this year. (Courtesy Photo / Sealaska Heritage)
Video

Ancient weir sheds new light on Alaska Native history

Stone fish trap dates to at least 11,100 years ago, according to scientists.

Seadrone photo showing stone fish trap found in Shakan Bay on the west side of Prince of Wales could potentially be oldest ever found in the world. The structure was first discovered in 2010 and officially confirmed as a stone weir earlier this year. (Courtesy Photo / Sealaska Heritage)
Video
Salmon Northwest Coast art on the Wrangell Cooperative Association community smokehouse. (Vivian Faith Prescott / For the Capital City Weekly)

Planet Alaska: Smokehouse values

There are many ways to smoke salmon, but it takes discipline to take the time to learn and listen.

Salmon Northwest Coast art on the Wrangell Cooperative Association community smokehouse. (Vivian Faith Prescott / For the Capital City Weekly)
Education Secretary Miguel Cardona listens as President Joe Biden speaks about student loan debt forgiveness in the Roosevelt Room of the White House, Wednesday, Aug. 24, 2022, in Washington. The Department of Education recently announced $35 million in grants to support Alaska Native education projects in the state. “I am excited to announce 28 new Alaska Native Education program projects, which will help better meet the needs of Alaska Native students at this critical moment and continue to strengthen the relationship between the Department and Alaska Native Organizations,” said Cardona in a statement. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

Feds award $35M to support Alaska Native education projects

The 28 grantees across the state received more than $35 million in federal funds combined

Education Secretary Miguel Cardona listens as President Joe Biden speaks about student loan debt forgiveness in the Roosevelt Room of the White House, Wednesday, Aug. 24, 2022, in Washington. The Department of Education recently announced $35 million in grants to support Alaska Native education projects in the state. “I am excited to announce 28 new Alaska Native Education program projects, which will help better meet the needs of Alaska Native students at this critical moment and continue to strengthen the relationship between the Department and Alaska Native Organizations,” said Cardona in a statement. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)
Clarise Larson / Juneau Empire
Laird Jones, a Juneau resident who attended a sharing event Friday, shares the story of his great-aunt’s death while attending the Carlisle Indian Industrial School in Pennsylvania. She is still buried in one of its graveyard’s 14 unmarked graves, Jones said. His family is on a mission to bring her home to Alaska and to share her story.
Clarise Larson / Juneau Empire
Laird Jones, a Juneau resident who attended a sharing event Friday, shares the story of his great-aunt’s death while attending the Carlisle Indian Industrial School in Pennsylvania. She is still buried in one of its graveyard’s 14 unmarked graves, Jones said. His family is on a mission to bring her home to Alaska and to share her story.
Courtesy Photo / Alaska Federation of Natives
Alaska Gov. Mike Dunleavy holds up a bill providing state recognition of the 229 federally recognized Alaska Native tribes after signing it Thursday during a ceremony at the Alaska Native Heritage Center in Anchorage. He also signed a bill authorizing tribes to establish compact schools under a pilot program.

Tribal recognition bill arrives with lessons

Pilot program allowing Alaska Native compact schools adds heft to ceremony.

Courtesy Photo / Alaska Federation of Natives
Alaska Gov. Mike Dunleavy holds up a bill providing state recognition of the 229 federally recognized Alaska Native tribes after signing it Thursday during a ceremony at the Alaska Native Heritage Center in Anchorage. He also signed a bill authorizing tribes to establish compact schools under a pilot program.
Alaskans for Better Government members La quen náay Liz Medicine Crow, Richard Chalyee Éesh Peterson and ‘Wáahlaal Gidáak Barbara Blake embrace on the floor of the Alaska State Senate on Friday, May 13, 2022, following the passage of House Bill 123, a bill to formally recognize the state's 229 already federally-recognized tribes. Gov. Mike Dunleavy is scheduled to sign the bill during a ceremony Thursday during a ceremony in Anchorage. (Peter Segall / Juneau Empire)

Alaska Natives welcome tribal recognition by state at least

Dunleavy to sign bill Thursday; advocates say it advances cooperative relations.

Alaskans for Better Government members La quen náay Liz Medicine Crow, Richard Chalyee Éesh Peterson and ‘Wáahlaal Gidáak Barbara Blake embrace on the floor of the Alaska State Senate on Friday, May 13, 2022, following the passage of House Bill 123, a bill to formally recognize the state's 229 already federally-recognized tribes. Gov. Mike Dunleavy is scheduled to sign the bill during a ceremony Thursday during a ceremony in Anchorage. (Peter Segall / Juneau Empire)
Sealaska Corp. announced it will no longer require a blood quantum for people of Alaskan Native descent to become a shareholder. (Michael S. Lockett/ Juneau Empire)

Sealaska Corp drops blood quantum requirement

The decision opens the door to approximately 15,000 people to enroll

Sealaska Corp. announced it will no longer require a blood quantum for people of Alaskan Native descent to become a shareholder. (Michael S. Lockett/ Juneau Empire)
Juneau-Douglas High School: Yadaa.at Kalé graduates toss their caps during graduation last month. The Juneau School District Board of Education approved on Friday a policy formally allowing students to wear regalia during graduation. (Mark Sabbatini / Juneau Empire)

Cultural regalia OK’d for big school events

School board OKs wearing of Native items, and those from other cultures, at public events

Juneau-Douglas High School: Yadaa.at Kalé graduates toss their caps during graduation last month. The Juneau School District Board of Education approved on Friday a policy formally allowing students to wear regalia during graduation. (Mark Sabbatini / Juneau Empire)
Fran Houston, cultural Leader of the A'akw Kwáan, dances during Celebration in downtown Juneau. Wednesday, the biennial celebration of Alaska Native peoples and cultures brought song, dance and the opening of a new arts campus to the capital city. (Mark Sabbatini / Juneau Empire)

Celebration opens with Sealaska campus debut

Dances, ceremonies, Alaska’s first 360-degree totem and a new discovery about old times mark event

Fran Houston, cultural Leader of the A'akw Kwáan, dances during Celebration in downtown Juneau. Wednesday, the biennial celebration of Alaska Native peoples and cultures brought song, dance and the opening of a new arts campus to the capital city. (Mark Sabbatini / Juneau Empire)
Kristall Bullock, 16, right, a Ketchikan resident whose Native-themed vest is part of the Sealaska Heritage Juried Youth Art Exhibit, examines works by her peers during the debt of the exhibit Friday at the Juneau Arts and Humanities Council. She said she saw works at the exhibit during Celebration in 2018, when she was with one of the dance groups, and “I was thinking I want to have a piece.” Viewing other works at the exhibit with Bullock are her sister, Anna Lindgren, and 8-month-old niece, Evelyn. (Mark Sabbatini / Juneau Empire)

Healthy outlook for return of Celebration

Landmark Alaska Native event returns to Juneau starting Wednesday, with strict COVID-19 rules.

Kristall Bullock, 16, right, a Ketchikan resident whose Native-themed vest is part of the Sealaska Heritage Juried Youth Art Exhibit, examines works by her peers during the debt of the exhibit Friday at the Juneau Arts and Humanities Council. She said she saw works at the exhibit during Celebration in 2018, when she was with one of the dance groups, and “I was thinking I want to have a piece.” Viewing other works at the exhibit with Bullock are her sister, Anna Lindgren, and 8-month-old niece, Evelyn. (Mark Sabbatini / Juneau Empire)
The Sealaska Heritage Institute's new arts campus was still under construction on Wednesday, May 25, 2022, but will officially open at noon this Wednesday for the start of Celebration, Sealaska's biennial festival. (Peter Segall / Juneau Empire)
The Sealaska Heritage Institute's new arts campus was still under construction on Wednesday, May 25, 2022, but will officially open at noon this Wednesday for the start of Celebration, Sealaska's biennial festival. (Peter Segall / Juneau Empire)
Michael S. Lockett / Juneau Empire 
Volunteers clear deadwood and undergrowth as part of the cleanup of the cemetery near Lawson Creek on May 14, 2022.

Clearing and healing: Lawson Creek Cemetery restoration continues

Volunteers are bringing what was neglected back to light.

Michael S. Lockett / Juneau Empire 
Volunteers clear deadwood and undergrowth as part of the cleanup of the cemetery near Lawson Creek on May 14, 2022.
Alaskans for Better Government members La quen náay Liz Medicine Crow, Richard Chalyee Éesh Peterson and ‘Wáahlaal Gidáak Barbara Blake embrace on the floor of the Alaska State Senate following the passage of House Bill 123, a bill to formally recognize the state’s 229 already federally-recognized tribes. (Peter Segall / Juneau Empire)
Alaskans for Better Government members La quen náay Liz Medicine Crow, Richard Chalyee Éesh Peterson and ‘Wáahlaal Gidáak Barbara Blake embrace on the floor of the Alaska State Senate following the passage of House Bill 123, a bill to formally recognize the state’s 229 already federally-recognized tribes. (Peter Segall / Juneau Empire)
In this July 8, 2021, photo, adjunct history professor and research associate Larry Larrichio holds a copy of a late 19th century photograph of pupils at an Indigenous boarding school in Santa Fe during an interview in Albuquerque, New Mexico. The U.S. Interior Department is expected to release a report Wednesday, May 11, 2022, that it says will begin to uncover the truth about the federal government's past oversight of Native American boarding schools. (AP Photo/Susan Montoya Bryan, File)

U.S. identifies Indigenous boarding schools, burial sites

The report expands the number of schools that were known to have operated for 150 years.

In this July 8, 2021, photo, adjunct history professor and research associate Larry Larrichio holds a copy of a late 19th century photograph of pupils at an Indigenous boarding school in Santa Fe during an interview in Albuquerque, New Mexico. The U.S. Interior Department is expected to release a report Wednesday, May 11, 2022, that it says will begin to uncover the truth about the federal government's past oversight of Native American boarding schools. (AP Photo/Susan Montoya Bryan, File)
Red painted handprints cover the empty spot at a park in Albuquerque, New Mexico, on Thursday, July 1, 2021, where a historical marker for the Indigenous children who died while attending a boarding school nearby was removed. The U.S. Interior Department is expected to release a report Wednesday, May 11, 2022, that it says will begin to uncover the truth about the federal government's past oversight of Native American boarding schools.  (AP Photo / Susan Montoya Bryan,File)

U.S. agency to release report on Indigenous boarding schools

The report was prompted by the discovery of hundreds of unmarked graves at sites in Canada.

Red painted handprints cover the empty spot at a park in Albuquerque, New Mexico, on Thursday, July 1, 2021, where a historical marker for the Indigenous children who died while attending a boarding school nearby was removed. The U.S. Interior Department is expected to release a report Wednesday, May 11, 2022, that it says will begin to uncover the truth about the federal government's past oversight of Native American boarding schools.  (AP Photo / Susan Montoya Bryan,File)
Donovan Jackson, 12, of Juneau competes in the one-foot high kick during the 2022 Traditional Games on April 2, 2022. The games were held at Thunder Mountain High School. (Ben Hohenstatt / Juneau Empire file)

Juneau hosts record-setting Traditional Games competition

It was the largest iteration of the games held in Juneau yet.

Donovan Jackson, 12, of Juneau competes in the one-foot high kick during the 2022 Traditional Games on April 2, 2022. The games were held at Thunder Mountain High School. (Ben Hohenstatt / Juneau Empire file)
From left to right: Chairman of Goldbelt Inc.'s Board of Directors Todd Antioquia, Sealaska Corporation Board of Director's Chair Joe Nelson; Sealaska CEO Anthony Mallot; Goldbelt President and CEO McHugh Pierre and University of Alaska Southeast Chancellor Karen Carey at the Centennial Hall on Thursday, March 17, 2022 for the Juneau Economic Development Corporation's annual innovation summit. (Peter Segall / Juneau Empire)
From left to right: Chairman of Goldbelt Inc.'s Board of Directors Todd Antioquia, Sealaska Corporation Board of Director's Chair Joe Nelson; Sealaska CEO Anthony Mallot; Goldbelt President and CEO McHugh Pierre and University of Alaska Southeast Chancellor Karen Carey at the Centennial Hall on Thursday, March 17, 2022 for the Juneau Economic Development Corporation's annual innovation summit. (Peter Segall / Juneau Empire)