State lawmakers including Juneau Democrats Sen. Jesse Kiehl and Rep. Andi Story, pose with a copy of a joint resolution urging federal action to allow cruising to return to Alaska this summer. Gov. Mike Dunleavy stands to the left and Juneau Mayor Beth Weldon is in the left background in the hangar of Wings Airways in Juneau on Friday, April 9, 2021. (Peter Segall / Juneau Empire)
State lawmakers including Juneau Democrats Sen. Jesse Kiehl and Rep. Andi Story, pose with a copy of a joint resolution urging federal action to allow cruising to return to Alaska this summer. Gov. Mike Dunleavy stands to the left and Juneau Mayor Beth Weldon is in the left background in the hangar of Wings Airways in Juneau on Friday, April 9, 2021. (Peter Segall / Juneau Empire)
In this October 2018 photo, Bjorn Dihle inspects the acid mine drainage flowing into the Tulsequah River from a containment pond filled by effluent from the Tulsequah Chief Mine in British Columbia, Canada. (Courtesy Photo | Chris Miller)

Elected officials: Safe mining needed for salmon

Virtual briefing focuses on transboundary waters.

In this October 2018 photo, Bjorn Dihle inspects the acid mine drainage flowing into the Tulsequah River from a containment pond filled by effluent from the Tulsequah Chief Mine in British Columbia, Canada. (Courtesy Photo | Chris Miller)
Gov. Mike Dunleavy sent a letter to the White House asking for federal action to get cruise ship passengers, like the ones seen here in this 2017 file photo, back in Alaska. (Michael Penn / Juneau Empire File)
Gov. Mike Dunleavy sent a letter to the White House asking for federal action to get cruise ship passengers, like the ones seen here in this 2017 file photo, back in Alaska. (Michael Penn / Juneau Empire File)
Gavel (Courtesy photo)

Court sides with Dunleavy in appointments dispute

The court, in a brief order, reversed a ruling by a superior court judge.

Gavel (Courtesy photo)
In this file photo from April 13, 2017, firefighters spray foam during a drill at the Hagevig Regional Fire Training Center. The state filed a lawsuit against several foam manufacturers for not disclosing contaminants in their products. (Michael Penn | Juneau Empire File)
In this file photo from April 13, 2017, firefighters spray foam during a drill at the Hagevig Regional Fire Training Center. The state filed a lawsuit against several foam manufacturers for not disclosing contaminants in their products. (Michael Penn | Juneau Empire File)
The new Glory Hall, currently under construction near the airport, is due to open on July 1, 2021, as the contract for the shelter at the Juneau Arts and Culture Center ends after a year and a half of pandemic. (Michael S. Lockett / Juneau Empire)
The new Glory Hall, currently under construction near the airport, is due to open on July 1, 2021, as the contract for the shelter at the Juneau Arts and Culture Center ends after a year and a half of pandemic. (Michael S. Lockett / Juneau Empire)
A health care worker prepares a dose of COVID-19 vaccine. There's concern that COVID-19 vaccination could be made mandatory by businesses for activities such as travel-- or employment. (Ben Hohenstatt / Juneau Empire File)
A health care worker prepares a dose of COVID-19 vaccine. There's concern that COVID-19 vaccination could be made mandatory by businesses for activities such as travel-- or employment. (Ben Hohenstatt / Juneau Empire File)
Teaser

Alaska court hears arguments in dispute over appointments

State Supreme Court considers whether governor appointments to boards, commissions and his cabinet.

Teaser
Longtime Alaska law enforcement official Jim Cockrell, seen here in an undated photo in his role as a colonel with the Alaska State Troopers, was appointed by Gov. Mike Dunleavy as Commissioner of the Department of Public Safety on Tuesday, April 6, 2021. (Courtesy photo / Office of Gov. Mike Dunleavy)

Dunleavy appoints new Public Safety Commissioner

Law enforcement veteran to lead state’s public safety department.

Longtime Alaska law enforcement official Jim Cockrell, seen here in an undated photo in his role as a colonel with the Alaska State Troopers, was appointed by Gov. Mike Dunleavy as Commissioner of the Department of Public Safety on Tuesday, April 6, 2021. (Courtesy photo / Office of Gov. Mike Dunleavy)
FILE - This May 10, 2017 file photo shows Denali, North America's tallest peak, from an airplane flying over the Alaska Range near Talkeetna, Alaska. Officials on Monday, April 5, 2021, said five people had to ski to a shelter after they landed on Ruth Glacier at the base of Denali on April 2, 2021, and a heavy snowstorm stranded them for at least three days. (AP Photo/Mark Thiessen, File)

Snowstorm strands 5 who landed 3 planes on Denali glacier

They were stranded for the weekend after landing Friday on Ruth Glacier.

FILE - This May 10, 2017 file photo shows Denali, North America's tallest peak, from an airplane flying over the Alaska Range near Talkeetna, Alaska. Officials on Monday, April 5, 2021, said five people had to ski to a shelter after they landed on Ruth Glacier at the base of Denali on April 2, 2021, and a heavy snowstorm stranded them for at least three days. (AP Photo/Mark Thiessen, File)

US approves $47.5M to build new Newtok airport, repair 2

Newtok was granted more than $21.1 million to construct a new airport scheduled to be completed by 2023.

Bethel OKs investigator to review sex crime processes

The move is in response to a case in which a woman said it took police seven hours to respond.

This 2020 electron microscope image provided by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases - Rocky Mountain Laboratories shows SARS-CoV-2 virus particles which cause COVID-19, isolated from a patient in the U.S., emerging from the surface of cells cultured in a lab. Viruses are constantly mutating, with coronavirus variants circulating around the globe. (NIAID-RML)

COVID at a glance for Friday, April 2

The most recent state and local numbers.

This 2020 electron microscope image provided by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases - Rocky Mountain Laboratories shows SARS-CoV-2 virus particles which cause COVID-19, isolated from a patient in the U.S., emerging from the surface of cells cultured in a lab. Viruses are constantly mutating, with coronavirus variants circulating around the globe. (NIAID-RML)
Prescriptions drugs, vitamins, hormones, and other drugs left in the drug drop box in the lobby of the Juneau Police Department displayed on Thursday, Sept. 26, 2019. The state is suing prescription drug companies, accusing them of helping to fuel a drug crisis in the state. (Michael Penn / Juneau Empire File)

State sues drug companies over opioids

Not Alaska’s first opioid lawsuit.

Prescriptions drugs, vitamins, hormones, and other drugs left in the drug drop box in the lobby of the Juneau Police Department displayed on Thursday, Sept. 26, 2019. The state is suing prescription drug companies, accusing them of helping to fuel a drug crisis in the state. (Michael Penn / Juneau Empire File)
This 2020 electron microscope image provided by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases - Rocky Mountain Laboratories shows SARS-CoV-2 virus particles which cause COVID-19, isolated from a patient in the U.S., emerging from the surface of cells cultured in a lab. Viruses are constantly mutating, with coronavirus variants circulating around the globe. (NIAID-RML)
This 2020 electron microscope image provided by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases - Rocky Mountain Laboratories shows SARS-CoV-2 virus particles which cause COVID-19, isolated from a patient in the U.S., emerging from the surface of cells cultured in a lab. Viruses are constantly mutating, with coronavirus variants circulating around the globe. (NIAID-RML)
The banner at the center of a U.S. Supreme Court case on display at the Newseum in Washington D.C. The banner's owner was unable to find it a home in Juneau, and it's been sent to the First Amendment Museum in Maine. (Wikicommons)
The banner at the center of a U.S. Supreme Court case on display at the Newseum in Washington D.C. The banner's owner was unable to find it a home in Juneau, and it's been sent to the First Amendment Museum in Maine. (Wikicommons)