domestic violence

Snow falls on the Alaska State Capitol on Monday, Jan. 30, 2023. (Photo by James Brooks/Alaska Beacon)

Funding gap looms for Alaska’s domestic violence programs, but need for services is as high as ever

A major source of funding for Alaska’s domestic violence response has decreased significantly in the past five years, leaving a multimillion-dollar hole in the budget… Continue reading

 

Charlene Apok leads Data for Indigenous Justice and works with the state’s Maternal Child Death Review to understand maternal mortality in Alaska. Apok analyzed data in their office on Sept. 25. (Photo by Claire Stremple/Alaska Beacon)

Data links Alaska’s sky-high maternal mortality rate to domestic violence

Studies show violence and overdoses cause more deaths than medical problems.

 

An encampment of homeless people is off of 1st Avenue in Anchorage on Nov. 21. (Photo by Andrew Kitchenman/Alaska Beacon)

Domestic violence is feeding Alaska’s homelessness crisis

Part of the series “Domestic violence in Alaska: A crisis at home.”

 

Late evening on the Kuskokwim River in Nunapitchuk on Oct. 12. (Photo by Claire Stremple/Alaska Beacon)

Tribes, State Troopers increase access to justice for Alaska Native survivors of domestic violence

Alaska State Troopers received new training in October aimed at keeping Tribal citizens safer

Late evening on the Kuskokwim River in Nunapitchuk on Oct. 12. (Photo by Claire Stremple/Alaska Beacon)
Jennifer Kirk, left, and Susanna “Sue Sue” Norton both died, two years apart, in homes owned by a former mayor and often occupied by his adult sons. Credit:Left photo: Facebook; right photo: courtesy of Lesley Sundberg

One woman died on an Alaska mayor’s property. Then another. No one has ever been charged.

Ex-mayor’s sons faced few consequences despite history of similar allegations.

Jennifer Kirk, left, and Susanna “Sue Sue” Norton both died, two years apart, in homes owned by a former mayor and often occupied by his adult sons. Credit:Left photo: Facebook; right photo: courtesy of Lesley Sundberg
Freshly made beds are seen in an unoccupied room at the Fairbanks emergency shelter, Interior Alaska center for Non-Violent Living on Oct. 14. (Claire Stremple/Alaska Beacon)

Alaska pays millions to respond to domestic violence. Advocates want millions to prevent it.

When Kara Carlson experienced sexual assault as a teenager, she said it was traumatic but not shocking: “I was the last of my friends to… Continue reading

Freshly made beds are seen in an unoccupied room at the Fairbanks emergency shelter, Interior Alaska center for Non-Violent Living on Oct. 14. (Claire Stremple/Alaska Beacon)
Patty Raymond-Turner, a coordinator for the Brain Injury Council of Alaska, demonstrates what happens to the brain when it is injured, on Sept. 26 in Anchorage. (Photo by Claire Stremple/Alaska Beacon)

Advocates link Alaska’s high rate of traumatic brain injury with domestic violence

A new diagnostic tool could increase access to care for survivors.

Patty Raymond-Turner, a coordinator for the Brain Injury Council of Alaska, demonstrates what happens to the brain when it is injured, on Sept. 26 in Anchorage. (Photo by Claire Stremple/Alaska Beacon)
A view of Juneau is seen from Mt. Roberts on Nov. 1, 2022. (Claire Stremple/Alaska Beacon)

Domestic violence in Alaska: A crisis at home

Survivors and advocates shed light on how far the state has come and the work yet to be done.

A view of Juneau is seen from Mt. Roberts on Nov. 1, 2022. (Claire Stremple/Alaska Beacon)
Alaska State Troopers and the Department of Public Safety are investigating a series of five domestic-violence connected murders across rural Alaska in late Junea and early July. (Public Domain | RadioKAOS)
Alaska State Troopers and the Department of Public Safety are investigating a series of five domestic-violence connected murders across rural Alaska in late Junea and early July. (Public Domain | RadioKAOS)
People pay tribute to the Woosh.ji.een Dance Group as they perform during a Celebrate Survivors gathering sponsored by Central Council Tlingit and Haida Indian Tribes of Alaska and AWARE in the Elizabeth Peratrovich Hall in 2018. (Michael Penn | Juneau Empire File)
People pay tribute to the Woosh.ji.een Dance Group as they perform during a Celebrate Survivors gathering sponsored by Central Council Tlingit and Haida Indian Tribes of Alaska and AWARE in the Elizabeth Peratrovich Hall in 2018. (Michael Penn | Juneau Empire File)
79-year-old man beaten brutally

79-year-old man beaten brutally

The victim needed three days rest before he could make it to the hospital.

79-year-old man beaten brutally
Police responding to domestic violence incident shoot man twice

Police responding to domestic violence incident shoot man twice

Police responded to calls of a woman being strangled in a car outside of the Mendenhall Valley Safeway.

Police responding to domestic violence incident shoot man twice
March and rally ends the silence

March and rally ends the silence

Women and men speak out against violence

March and rally ends the silence