Coronavirus

This 2020 electron microscope image provided by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases - Rocky Mountain Laboratories shows SARS-CoV-2 virus particles which cause COVID-19, isolated from a patient in the U.S., emerging from the surface of cells cultured in a lab. Viruses are constantly mutating, with coronavirus variants circulating around the globe. (NIAID-RML)

COVID at a glance for Friday, March 5

The most recent state and local numbers.

 

This 2020 electron microscope image provided by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases - Rocky Mountain Laboratories shows SARS-CoV-2 virus particles which cause COVID-19, isolated from a patient in the U.S., emerging from the surface of cells cultured in a lab. Viruses are constantly mutating, with coronavirus variants circulating around the globe. (NIAID-RML)

COVID at a glance for Thursday, March 4

The most recent state and local numbers.

 

This 2020 electron microscope image provided by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases - Rocky Mountain Laboratories shows SARS-CoV-2 virus particles which cause COVID-19, isolated from a patient in the U.S., emerging from the surface of cells cultured in a lab. Viruses are constantly mutating, with coronavirus variants circulating around the globe. (NIAID-RML)
This 2020 electron microscope image provided by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases - Rocky Mountain Laboratories shows SARS-CoV-2 virus particles which cause COVID-19, isolated from a patient in the U.S., emerging from the surface of cells cultured in a lab. Viruses are constantly mutating, with coronavirus variants circulating around the globe. (NIAID-RML)
Pharmacist Madeline Acquilano draws a syringe of Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 at Hartford Hospital in Hartford, Conn., Wednesday, March 3, 2021. The first shipments of the vaccine arrived at the hospital this morning. Cities and states are rapidly expanding access to vaccines as the nation races to head off a resurgence in coronavirus infections and reopen schools and businesses battered by the pandemic. (AP Photo/Jessica Hill)
Pharmacist Madeline Acquilano draws a syringe of Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 at Hartford Hospital in Hartford, Conn., Wednesday, March 3, 2021. The first shipments of the vaccine arrived at the hospital this morning. Cities and states are rapidly expanding access to vaccines as the nation races to head off a resurgence in coronavirus infections and reopen schools and businesses battered by the pandemic. (AP Photo/Jessica Hill)
The Holland America Line cruise ships Eurodam, left, and Nieuw Amsterdam pull into Juneau’s downtown harbor on May 1, 2017. Large cruise ships are unlikely to visit Alaska this summer due to ongoing COVID-19 concerns, restrictions at the Canadian border, and a lack of sailing guidance from the Centers for Disease Control. However, in a close 5-4 vote Monday evening, the City Assembly decided to relax COVID-19-related travel mandates sooner rather than later and made other changes to make travel easier for the upcoming tourist season. (Michael Penn/Juneau Empire File)
The Holland America Line cruise ships Eurodam, left, and Nieuw Amsterdam pull into Juneau’s downtown harbor on May 1, 2017. Large cruise ships are unlikely to visit Alaska this summer due to ongoing COVID-19 concerns, restrictions at the Canadian border, and a lack of sailing guidance from the Centers for Disease Control. However, in a close 5-4 vote Monday evening, the City Assembly decided to relax COVID-19-related travel mandates sooner rather than later and made other changes to make travel easier for the upcoming tourist season. (Michael Penn/Juneau Empire File)
This 2020 electron microscope image provided by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases - Rocky Mountain Laboratories shows SARS-CoV-2 virus particles which cause COVID-19, isolated from a patient in the U.S., emerging from the surface of cells cultured in a lab. Viruses are constantly mutating, with coronavirus variants circulating around the globe. (NIAID-RML)
This 2020 electron microscope image provided by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases - Rocky Mountain Laboratories shows SARS-CoV-2 virus particles which cause COVID-19, isolated from a patient in the U.S., emerging from the surface of cells cultured in a lab. Viruses are constantly mutating, with coronavirus variants circulating around the globe. (NIAID-RML)
This 2020 electron microscope image provided by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases - Rocky Mountain Laboratories shows SARS-CoV-2 virus particles which cause COVID-19, isolated from a patient in the U.S., emerging from the surface of cells cultured in a lab. Viruses are constantly mutating, with coronavirus variants circulating around the globe. (NIAID-RML)

COVID at a glance for Monday, March 1

The most recent state and local numbers.

This 2020 electron microscope image provided by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases - Rocky Mountain Laboratories shows SARS-CoV-2 virus particles which cause COVID-19, isolated from a patient in the U.S., emerging from the surface of cells cultured in a lab. Viruses are constantly mutating, with coronavirus variants circulating around the globe. (NIAID-RML)
Alaska state Sen. Lora Reinbold, an Eagle River Republican, holds a copy of the Alaska Constitution during a committee hearing in Juneau, Alaska. Reinbold has been a vocal critic, along with other lawmakers, of Gov. Mike Dunleavy’s disaster declarations while the Legislature was not in session. She has used her committee to amplify voices of those who question the effectiveness of masks and the usefulness of the government’s emergency response. In a scathing letter that included references to her Facebook posts, Dunleavy accused Reinbold of misrepresenting the state’s COVID-19 response and deceiving the public. “The misinformation must end,” the governor wrote. (AP Photo / Becky Bohrer)

Some GOP state lawmakers help spread COVID-19 misinformation

Republican state lawmakers are using their platform to promote false information about the virus.

Alaska state Sen. Lora Reinbold, an Eagle River Republican, holds a copy of the Alaska Constitution during a committee hearing in Juneau, Alaska. Reinbold has been a vocal critic, along with other lawmakers, of Gov. Mike Dunleavy’s disaster declarations while the Legislature was not in session. She has used her committee to amplify voices of those who question the effectiveness of masks and the usefulness of the government’s emergency response. In a scathing letter that included references to her Facebook posts, Dunleavy accused Reinbold of misrepresenting the state’s COVID-19 response and deceiving the public. “The misinformation must end,” the governor wrote. (AP Photo / Becky Bohrer)
This July 2020 photo provided by Johnson & Johnson shows a vial of the COVID-19 vaccine in Belgium. The U.S. is getting a third vaccine to prevent COVID-19, as the Food and Drug Administration on Saturday, Feb. 27, 2021 cleared a Johnson & Johnson shot that works with just one dose instead of two.(Courtesy Photo / Johnson & Johnson)
This July 2020 photo provided by Johnson & Johnson shows a vial of the COVID-19 vaccine in Belgium. The U.S. is getting a third vaccine to prevent COVID-19, as the Food and Drug Administration on Saturday, Feb. 27, 2021 cleared a Johnson & Johnson shot that works with just one dose instead of two.(Courtesy Photo / Johnson & Johnson)
This 2020 electron microscope image provided by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases - Rocky Mountain Laboratories shows SARS-CoV-2 virus particles which cause COVID-19, isolated from a patient in the U.S., emerging from the surface of cells cultured in a lab. Viruses are constantly mutating, with coronavirus variants circulating around the globe. (NIAID-RML)

COVID at a glance for Friday, Feb. 26

The most recent state and local numbers.

This 2020 electron microscope image provided by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases - Rocky Mountain Laboratories shows SARS-CoV-2 virus particles which cause COVID-19, isolated from a patient in the U.S., emerging from the surface of cells cultured in a lab. Viruses are constantly mutating, with coronavirus variants circulating around the globe. (NIAID-RML)
Meetings at the Alaska State Capitol, seen here in this December 19, 2020 file photo, were canceled Thursday after a member of the House of Representatives tested positive for COVID-19. (Peter Segall / Juneau Empire file)
Meetings at the Alaska State Capitol, seen here in this December 19, 2020 file photo, were canceled Thursday after a member of the House of Representatives tested positive for COVID-19. (Peter Segall / Juneau Empire file)
The City and Borough of Juneau’s Augustus G. Brown Swimming Pool, pictured here last spring, and the Dimond Park Aquatic Center will both expand their capacity and offer additional flexibility for lap swims beginning March 1. They are among the CBJ facilities that will expand offerings now that the city’s COVID risk level has been reduced to Level 1, or minimal risk. (Peter Segall/Juneau Empire)

City officials optimistic about local COVID-19 situation

The numbers look good, but city leaders call for continued vigilance

The City and Borough of Juneau’s Augustus G. Brown Swimming Pool, pictured here last spring, and the Dimond Park Aquatic Center will both expand their capacity and offer additional flexibility for lap swims beginning March 1. They are among the CBJ facilities that will expand offerings now that the city’s COVID risk level has been reduced to Level 1, or minimal risk. (Peter Segall/Juneau Empire)
This 2020 electron microscope image provided by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases - Rocky Mountain Laboratories shows SARS-CoV-2 virus particles which cause COVID-19, isolated from a patient in the U.S., emerging from the surface of cells cultured in a lab. Viruses are constantly mutating, with coronavirus variants circulating around the globe. (NIAID-RML)
This 2020 electron microscope image provided by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases - Rocky Mountain Laboratories shows SARS-CoV-2 virus particles which cause COVID-19, isolated from a patient in the U.S., emerging from the surface of cells cultured in a lab. Viruses are constantly mutating, with coronavirus variants circulating around the globe. (NIAID-RML)
Gov. Mike Dunleavy addresses the public during a virtual town hall on Sept. 15, 2020 in Alaska. Dunleavy tested positive for COVID-19 his office announced Wednesday. (Courtesy Photo / Office of the Governor)
Gov. Mike Dunleavy addresses the public during a virtual town hall on Sept. 15, 2020 in Alaska. Dunleavy tested positive for COVID-19 his office announced Wednesday. (Courtesy Photo / Office of the Governor)
This 2020 electron microscope image provided by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases - Rocky Mountain Laboratories shows SARS-CoV-2 virus particles which cause COVID-19, isolated from a patient in the U.S., emerging from the surface of cells cultured in a lab. Viruses are constantly mutating, with coronavirus variants circulating around the globe. (NIAID-RML)

COVID at a glance for Tuesday, Feb. 23

The most recent state and local numbers.

This 2020 electron microscope image provided by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases - Rocky Mountain Laboratories shows SARS-CoV-2 virus particles which cause COVID-19, isolated from a patient in the U.S., emerging from the surface of cells cultured in a lab. Viruses are constantly mutating, with coronavirus variants circulating around the globe. (NIAID-RML)
This 2020 electron microscope image provided by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases - Rocky Mountain Laboratories shows SARS-CoV-2 virus particles which cause COVID-19, isolated from a patient in the U.S., emerging from the surface of cells cultured in a lab. Viruses are constantly mutating, with coronavirus variants circulating around the globe. (NIAID-RML)

COVID at a glance for Monday, Feb. 21

The most recent state and local numbers.

This 2020 electron microscope image provided by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases - Rocky Mountain Laboratories shows SARS-CoV-2 virus particles which cause COVID-19, isolated from a patient in the U.S., emerging from the surface of cells cultured in a lab. Viruses are constantly mutating, with coronavirus variants circulating around the globe. (NIAID-RML)
This photo shows medical supplies on a table at a Feb. 11 vaccination clinic at Centennial Hall. Another clinic is planned for next month, and registration for it will open Wednesday for people 65 and older. (Michael S. Lockett / Juneau Empire File)

Vaccine clinic registration to open early for seniors

The clinic is in mid-March. Here’s how to register.

This photo shows medical supplies on a table at a Feb. 11 vaccination clinic at Centennial Hall. Another clinic is planned for next month, and registration for it will open Wednesday for people 65 and older. (Michael S. Lockett / Juneau Empire File)
Gov. Mike Dunleavy addresses the public during a virtual town hall on Sept. 15, 2020 in Alaska. Dunleavy went into self-quarantine Monday following news a close contact had tested positive for COVID-19. (Courtesy Photo / Office of the Governor)

Governor quarantines following close contact

Gov. Mike Dunleavy is in quarantine following close contact on Saturday with a person who recently tested positive for COVID-19. Dunleavy was informed of the… Continue reading

Gov. Mike Dunleavy addresses the public during a virtual town hall on Sept. 15, 2020 in Alaska. Dunleavy went into self-quarantine Monday following news a close contact had tested positive for COVID-19. (Courtesy Photo / Office of the Governor)
Juneau recently dropped its community risk level to Level 1. The change allows bars and gyms to become slightly more flexible in their operations. (Michael S. Lockett / Juneau Empire)

Lagers and joggers: Restrictions ease on local bars and gyms

The Level 1 distinction offers some subtle but important maneuvering room.

Juneau recently dropped its community risk level to Level 1. The change allows bars and gyms to become slightly more flexible in their operations. (Michael S. Lockett / Juneau Empire)