Alaska State Troopers and the Department of Public Safety are investigating a series of five domestic-violence connected murders across rural Alaska in late Junea and early July. (Public Domain | RadioKAOS)

Alaska State Troopers and the Department of Public Safety are investigating a series of five domestic-violence connected murders across rural Alaska in late Junea and early July. (Public Domain | RadioKAOS)

Troopers respond to spate of domestic violence killings across state

Five deaths occurred in less than 10 days.

The Department of Public Safety is asking for help from the public after five apparent domestic violence-related deaths have occurred across rural Alaska in less than 10 days.

“These deaths are tragic and a stark indication that the blight of domestic violence occurring across Alaska hasn’t ebbed,” Said DPS Commissioner Amanda Price in a news release. “The DPS can’t stop the violence alone; we need the public’s help.”

Lawrence Paul was killed in Grayling on June 22. Rhoade Adams of Noatak and Carol Whalen of McGrather were killed a day apart. Ray Phillip and Bajon Augline appear to have killed each other in Alakanuk on July 1. All of the deaths appear to be the result of domestic violence, DPS said in the release.

““Stopping the violence will take community involvement. Communities must partner with law enforcement to take proactive efforts to support victims and survivors of domestic violence by holding offenders accountable even before relationships turn physically violent,” Price said in the release. “The DPS will continue to seek even more solutions to help end the violence and welcomes community dialogue so Alaskans can have meaningful participation in the process.”

The DPS hosts the Council on Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault, which funds 35 programs dedicated to victims services, child advocacy, and mental health service for children, as well as legal and advocacy service, prevention programs, and perpetrator rehab programs, according to the press release.

“Alaskans know that our rate of domestic violence is one of the highest in the nation. This is not acceptable nor is it a distinction we intend to continue,” said L. Diane Casto, Executive Director of CDVSA. “The Council, in conjunction with partner agencies, works diligently to provide a myriad of services to victims and to fund programs to prevent domestic and sexual violence.”

Available resources for help with domestic violence include:

• For immediate response call 911

• Alaska 2-1-1 for assistance, referrals, resources

• National Domestic Violence Hotline

• Call 800-799-7233

• Text LOVEIS to 22522

• Online chat at www.thehotline.org

• Alaska’s CARELINE at 877-266-4357

• National Sexual Assault Hotline at 800-656-HOPE (4673)

• To report child abuse at 800-478-4444 or online at ReportChildAbuse@alaska.gov

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