Columns

Ryker Goddard shows how to cool off in the Southeast Alaskan forest. (Courtesy Photo / Mary Goddard)

Planet Alaska: Welcome to Ryker Camp

Southeast Alaska, through the eyes of a Tlingit child, a gift to us older humans.

Ryker Goddard shows how to cool off in the Southeast Alaskan forest. (Courtesy Photo / Mary Goddard)
A graphic shows warming of the Arctic compared to the rest of the world. The image was released as part of NOAA’s Arctic Report Card for 2021 at the American Geophysical Union Fall Meeting in New Orleans, Dec. 14, 2021.  (Courtesy Image / NOAA climate.gov)
A graphic shows warming of the Arctic compared to the rest of the world. The image was released as part of NOAA’s Arctic Report Card for 2021 at the American Geophysical Union Fall Meeting in New Orleans, Dec. 14, 2021.  (Courtesy Image / NOAA climate.gov)
The Pebble deposit lies at the headwaters of Bristol Bay, the greatest salmon fishery in the world. (Courtesy Photo / Colin Arisman)

Pride of Bristol Bay: Permanent protections in view for Bristol Bay

By Bjorn Dihle For more than two decades, those who care about Bristol Bay — the largest sockeye salmon run on the planet — have… Continue reading

The Pebble deposit lies at the headwaters of Bristol Bay, the greatest salmon fishery in the world. (Courtesy Photo / Colin Arisman)
Angela Ketah holds a bright bouquet of fresh flowers for her business, Sitka Flower & the Chocolate Moose. Angela’s dedication to her team’s wellbeing and growth has helped her lead the way through the difficulties of the pandemic, setting an example for entrepreneurs around the region. (Courtesy Photo / Lione Clare)

Resilient Peoples & Place: Sitka Flowers The Chocolate Moose is a small business growing with its team

Small businesses like Sitka Flowers The Chocolate Moose bring character to our downtown streets.

Angela Ketah holds a bright bouquet of fresh flowers for her business, Sitka Flower & the Chocolate Moose. Angela’s dedication to her team’s wellbeing and growth has helped her lead the way through the difficulties of the pandemic, setting an example for entrepreneurs around the region. (Courtesy Photo / Lione Clare)
The author with a Kenai River rainbow caught during his honeymoon in June. (Jeff Lund / for the Juneau Empire)

I Went to the Woods: It’s OK to be happy

Of course, it’s not as easy as going fishing.

The author with a Kenai River rainbow caught during his honeymoon in June. (Jeff Lund / for the Juneau Empire)
This photo shows sandhill cranes in a Southern Wisconsin field. "It’s always a big treat to see them," writes Mary F. Willson. (Courtesy Photo / J.S. Willson)

On the Trails: Visiting old home ground

By Mary F. Willson For the Juneau Empire In mid-October, I made a quick trip back to my old stomping grounds in southern Wisconsin. In… Continue reading

This photo shows sandhill cranes in a Southern Wisconsin field. "It’s always a big treat to see them," writes Mary F. Willson. (Courtesy Photo / J.S. Willson)
A bar-tailed godwit born in Alaska that undertakes one of the greatest non-stop migrations in the animal kingdom, often flying from Alaska straight to New Zealand in the fall. (Courtesy Photo / Zachary Pohlen)
A bar-tailed godwit born in Alaska that undertakes one of the greatest non-stop migrations in the animal kingdom, often flying from Alaska straight to New Zealand in the fall. (Courtesy Photo / Zachary Pohlen)
Yeilk’ Vivian Mork sits watching a sunset with nephews Timothy and Jackson Person, Wrangell. (Vivian Faith Prescott / For the Capital City Weekly)

Planet Alaska: 10 Southeast Alaskan gratitudes

Berries, arts, salmon and so much more.

Yeilk’ Vivian Mork sits watching a sunset with nephews Timothy and Jackson Person, Wrangell. (Vivian Faith Prescott / For the Capital City Weekly)
An American robin perches on a branch, with toes loosely curled. (Courtesy Photo / Bob Armstrong)

On the Trails: Why don’t birds fall off their perches?

A growing body of evidence suggests that birds have a second organ of equilibrium.

An American robin perches on a branch, with toes loosely curled. (Courtesy Photo / Bob Armstrong)
Heidi Pearson is an associate professor of marine biology at the University of Alaska Southeast and lives in Juneau.  (Courtesy Photo)

Sustainable Alaska: Climate change, reality and hope

We all have the ability to reduce our own carbon footprint

Heidi Pearson is an associate professor of marine biology at the University of Alaska Southeast and lives in Juneau.  (Courtesy Photo)
Oscar and Kéet inspect the fresh cohos caught by Mickey Prescott. (Vivian Faith Prescott / For the Capital City Weekly)

Planet Alaska: Coho know-how

Silver skin and golden stories.

Oscar and Kéet inspect the fresh cohos caught by Mickey Prescott. (Vivian Faith Prescott / For the Capital City Weekly)
A flying squirrel digs for a truffle in this undated photo. (Courtesy Photo / Bob Armstrong)
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A flying squirrel digs for a truffle in this undated photo. (Courtesy Photo / Bob Armstrong)
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Fairbanks City Transit System No. 142 of “Into the Wild” fame inside the engineering building on the UAF campus, where UA Museum of the North conservators will work on its preservation. (Courtesy Photo / Ned Rozell)
Fairbanks City Transit System No. 142 of “Into the Wild” fame inside the engineering building on the UAF campus, where UA Museum of the North conservators will work on its preservation. (Courtesy Photo / Ned Rozell)
Snow and rain are often annoying, but without the right amounts, rivers become too low for good floats and salmon spawning. (Jeff Lund / For the Juneau Empire)

I Went to the Woods: The two types of climate change

It’s about reusable water bottles, but also energy efficient homes.

Snow and rain are often annoying, but without the right amounts, rivers become too low for good floats and salmon spawning. (Jeff Lund / For the Juneau Empire)
In May, Yéilk’ Vivian Mork of Planet Alaska organized “Stewards of the Land” a traditional plants symposium in Juneau to share knowledge, passion, and respectful harvesting practices of traditional plants as food and medicine. (Courtesy Photo / Jennifer Nu)

Resilient Peoples & Place: From Metlakatla to Yakutat, first food catalyst fellowship celebrates a summer of six

Program matches six community leaders with capital from the Native American Agriculture Fund.

In May, Yéilk’ Vivian Mork of Planet Alaska organized “Stewards of the Land” a traditional plants symposium in Juneau to share knowledge, passion, and respectful harvesting practices of traditional plants as food and medicine. (Courtesy Photo / Jennifer Nu)
Mount Juneau, looms above downtown Juneau in this April 2021 photo. (Peter Segall / Juneau Empire File)

Slack Tide: Alaskæpœdia — Juneau

Everything You’ve Always Wanted to Know About the Last Frontier… And Less: Juneau

Mount Juneau, looms above downtown Juneau in this April 2021 photo. (Peter Segall / Juneau Empire File)
A praying mantis eats the remnants of its mate. In most cases, females that are cannibalistic gain reproductive advantages by laying larger, bigger eggs that survive better than those of non-cannibalistic females. Therefore their deceased mates also gain reproductive advantages.(Oliver Koemmerling / Wikimedia)

On the Trails: Having family for dinner

Cannibalism in nature can be a family affair.

A praying mantis eats the remnants of its mate. In most cases, females that are cannibalistic gain reproductive advantages by laying larger, bigger eggs that survive better than those of non-cannibalistic females. Therefore their deceased mates also gain reproductive advantages.(Oliver Koemmerling / Wikimedia)
Sunset at Beaver Lake. (Courtesy Photo / Michael Humling)

The Salmon State: Bear man of Admiralty Island Allen Hasselborg — and climate change

By Mary Catharine Martin The Salmon State Every day for decades, bear hunter, guide, and early 20th century Southeast Alaska homesteader Allen Hasselborg logged the… Continue reading

Sunset at Beaver Lake. (Courtesy Photo / Michael Humling)
The author photographs one of the numerous bull moose he and his wife saw on an elk hunt in Wyoming. (Jeff Lund / For the Juneau Empire)

I Went to the Woods: Desired vs. realized success

No elk taken, but it’s nothing to grouse about.

The author photographs one of the numerous bull moose he and his wife saw on an elk hunt in Wyoming. (Jeff Lund / For the Juneau Empire)
This photo shows gray currents, also called stink currants, Vivian Mork photographer. (Vivian Mork Yeilk’ / For the Capital City Weekly)

Planet Alaska: Picking currants and riding currents

We give respect and thanks to the berries and the birds as we harvest the last of the berries.

This photo shows gray currents, also called stink currants, Vivian Mork photographer. (Vivian Mork Yeilk’ / For the Capital City Weekly)