Columns

The author was able to look at his new watch and see exactly what time the sun set so he could get to a location to photograph it. (Jeff Lund / For the Juneau Empire)

I Went to the Woods: Watch and learn

Wrist-y business.

The author was able to look at his new watch and see exactly what time the sun set so he could get to a location to photograph it. (Jeff Lund / For the Juneau Empire)
Kéet and Oscar wait patiently to play on the beach in winter in Wrangell. (Vivian Faith Prescott / For the Capital City Weekly)

Planet Alaska: Winter words

Phrases and words to use to create a Lingít language immersion outing in the winter.

Kéet and Oscar wait patiently to play on the beach in winter in Wrangell. (Vivian Faith Prescott / For the Capital City Weekly)
Molly Yazwinski holds a 3,000-year-old moose skull with antlers still attached, found in a river on Alaska’s North Slope. Her aunt, Pam Groves, steadies an inflatable canoe. (Courtesy Photo /Dan Mann)

 

2. A 14,000-year-old fragment of a moose antler, top left, rests on a sand bar of a northern river next to the bones of ice-age horses, caribou and muskoxen, as well as the horns of a steppe bison. Photo by Pam Groves.

 

3. Moose such as this one, photographed this year near Whitehorse in the Yukon, may have been present in Alaska as long as people have. Photo by Ned Rozell.

Alaska Science Forum: Ancient moose antlers hint of early arrival

When a great deal of Earth’s water was locked up within mountains of ice, our ancestors scampered across a dry corridor from what is today… Continue reading

Molly Yazwinski holds a 3,000-year-old moose skull with antlers still attached, found in a river on Alaska’s North Slope. Her aunt, Pam Groves, steadies an inflatable canoe. (Courtesy Photo /Dan Mann)

 

2. A 14,000-year-old fragment of a moose antler, top left, rests on a sand bar of a northern river next to the bones of ice-age horses, caribou and muskoxen, as well as the horns of a steppe bison. Photo by Pam Groves.

 

3. Moose such as this one, photographed this year near Whitehorse in the Yukon, may have been present in Alaska as long as people have. Photo by Ned Rozell.
A heron stands near Mendenhall Lake. (Courtesy Photo)
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November brings bright sights

A good snowfall in early November drew us out to enjoy the brightened landscape…

A heron stands near Mendenhall Lake. (Courtesy Photo)
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The author isn't a big fan of atmospheric rivers, but the forest variety are very much appreciated. (Jeff Lund / For the Juneau Empire)

I Went to the Woods: Tireless thankfulness

One should never tire of writing columns about gratitude. I hope I never do.

The author isn't a big fan of atmospheric rivers, but the forest variety are very much appreciated. (Jeff Lund / For the Juneau Empire)
Smoked salmon and salmon spread, Mickey’s Fishcamp, Wrangell Alaska. (Courtesy Photo / Vivian Faith Prescott)

Planet Alaska: Salmon gratitudes

What are we grateful for today? Is it our heritage, our homes, our art, elders, our food?

Smoked salmon and salmon spread, Mickey’s Fishcamp, Wrangell Alaska. (Courtesy Photo / Vivian Faith Prescott)
Emcees, Selah Judge and Almaria Alcantra, open the community feast. (Courtesy Photo /Jennifer Nu)

Resilient Peoples & Place: Food sovereignty, wellness and healing at UAS’ 2nd Annual Community Feast

“I hope you feel a sense of being together and united on this place.”

Emcees, Selah Judge and Almaria Alcantra, open the community feast. (Courtesy Photo /Jennifer Nu)
George Argus collects samples of willow shrubs on a slope near the town of McCarthy, Alaska in 1955. (Courtesy Photo / Neil Davis)

Alaska Science Forum: A man of the mountain, and its willows

When you are a young boy growing up in Brooklyn in the 1930s, sniffing warm pastries your father has placed in the window of his… Continue reading

George Argus collects samples of willow shrubs on a slope near the town of McCarthy, Alaska in 1955. (Courtesy Photo / Neil Davis)
This photo available under a Creative Commons license shows a lawn wolf spider in its funnel web in Laos. (Courtesy Photo / Basile Morin)

On the Trails: A wide world of webs

There are wonderfully diverse ways of using silk to detect and capture prey.

This photo available under a Creative Commons license shows a lawn wolf spider in its funnel web in Laos. (Courtesy Photo / Basile Morin)
Finding where bucks were isn't a problem this time of year. Finding where they are is the challenge. (Jeff Lund / For the Juneau Empire)

I Went to the Woods: Really skilled or really lucky

My success may come in spite of my method, not because of it.

Finding where bucks were isn't a problem this time of year. Finding where they are is the challenge. (Jeff Lund / For the Juneau Empire)
Spruce tip fireweed jelly. (Vivian Faith Prescott / For Capital City Weekly)

Planet Alaska: The magic of jam and jelly

There’s a lot of magic happening around us in nature and even in our kitchens.

Spruce tip fireweed jelly. (Vivian Faith Prescott / For Capital City Weekly)
"I have a close relationship with my computer. I’ll call her Betty, as long as when she calls me, she doesn’t call me Al," writes Peggy McKee Barnhill.(Peggy Mckee Barnhill / For the Juneau Empire)

Gimme a Smile: My computer—my BFF

Let me tell you about my best friend…

"I have a close relationship with my computer. I’ll call her Betty, as long as when she calls me, she doesn’t call me Al," writes Peggy McKee Barnhill.(Peggy Mckee Barnhill / For the Juneau Empire)
(Szabó János / Unsplash)

Slack Tide: Halloween isn’t just the name of an overplayed movie franchise

Help bring the ratings up: celebrate Halloween 2022!

(Szabó János / Unsplash)
This photo shows a cauldron of halibut chowder around the firepit on a Fall evening. (Vivian Faith Prescott / For the Capital City Weekly)

Planet Alaska: Chowder season

Fall reminds me of cupping my hands around a bowl of warm halibut chowder…

This photo shows a cauldron of halibut chowder around the firepit on a Fall evening. (Vivian Faith Prescott / For the Capital City Weekly)
The conference began Wednesday night, September 7, with Warming of the Hands, a greeting by local clan leaders. (Peter Metcalfe / Sharing Our Knowledge Conference)

Resilient Peoples & Place: When a time for peace is facilitated through partnership

There was a light mist in the air as I walked across the wooden bridge…

The conference began Wednesday night, September 7, with Warming of the Hands, a greeting by local clan leaders. (Peter Metcalfe / Sharing Our Knowledge Conference)
A platypus in the Sydney Aquarium chases fish and crayfish in this photo available under a Creative Commons license. (Alan Wolf / Flickr)

On the Trails: The eclectic marvels of electric ecology

What do a platypus, salamander and dolphin have in common?

A platypus in the Sydney Aquarium chases fish and crayfish in this photo available under a Creative Commons license. (Alan Wolf / Flickr)
UAA associate professor of public health Philippe Amstislavski collects samples of some of the fungi found in the forests around UAA which are similar to those his team has used to develop a lightweight packaging alternative to Styrofoam. (Courtesy Photo / James R. Evans, University of Alaska Anchorage)

Alaska Science Forum: Home insulation from wood and fungus

Alaska researchers are working to create insulation that removes carbon from the atmosphere.

UAA associate professor of public health Philippe Amstislavski collects samples of some of the fungi found in the forests around UAA which are similar to those his team has used to develop a lightweight packaging alternative to Styrofoam. (Courtesy Photo / James R. Evans, University of Alaska Anchorage)
Bears greet each other on Chichagof Island. (Courtesy Photo / Elleana Elliott)

Planet Alaska: Elleana Elliott — traveling an island of bears

“My first bear encounter was when I was young. I walked out the front door of my house and found myself walking backward, back toward… Continue reading

Bears greet each other on Chichagof Island. (Courtesy Photo / Elleana Elliott)
The author's wife navigates a steep section of the secret deer hunting spot that has been objectively underwhelming, but subjectively epic-in-the-making. Hopefully. (Jeff Lund / For the Juneau Empire)

I Went to the Woods: Subjective facts and truth

I find what I want to find and proclaim certainty. This is not helpful.

The author's wife navigates a steep section of the secret deer hunting spot that has been objectively underwhelming, but subjectively epic-in-the-making. Hopefully. (Jeff Lund / For the Juneau Empire)
Kelsey Aho holds a jar of clay she collected while fishing for hooligan on Turnagain Arm near Anchorage in 2021. (Courtesy Photo / Kelsey Aho)

Alaska Science Forum: Grains of Alaska made into art

“I can hand a piece of the Yukon River or Mendenhall Glacier to someone thousands of miles away…”

Kelsey Aho holds a jar of clay she collected while fishing for hooligan on Turnagain Arm near Anchorage in 2021. (Courtesy Photo / Kelsey Aho)