Climate Change

The entrance to the Alaska Gasline Development Corp.’s Anchorage office is seen on Aug. 11, 2023. The state-owned AGDC is pushing for a massive project that would ship natural gas south from the North Slope, liquefy it and send it on tankers from Cook Inlet to Asian markets. The AGDC proposal is among many that have been raised since the 1970s to try commercialize the North Slope’s stranded natural gas. (Yereth Rosen/Alaska Beacon)

Eight young Alaskans sue to block proposed trans-Alaska natural gas pipeline

Plaintiffs cite climate change that harms their access to fish, wildlife and natural resources.

 

The “Newtok Mothers” assembled as a panel at the Arctic Encounter Symposium on April 11 discuss the progress and challenges as village residents move from the eroding and thawing old site to a new village site called Mertarvik. Photographs showing deteriorating conditions in Newtok are displayed on a screen as the women speak at the event, held at Anchorage’s Dena’ina Civic and Convention Center. (Yereth Rosen/Alaska Beacon)

Relocation of eroding Alaska Native village seen as a test case for other threatened communities

Newtok-to-Mertarvik transformation has been decades in the making.

 

A wolf carries a piece of prey while walking through a national park in Alaska. (National Park Service photo)

In an era of climate change, Alaska’s predators fall prey to politics

“This story was originally published by Grist. Sign up for Grist’s weekly newsletter here.” As spring arrived in southwestern Alaska, a handful of people from… Continue reading

 

The result of the Wrangell landslide is seen on Nov. 20. (Alaska Department of Transportation and Public Facilities photo)

An Alaska climate expert reviews 2023’s weather and climate highlights

While Alaska didn’t have an ex-typhoon Merbok style widespread high impact event in 2023, there was still lots to contend with. Here’s a selection, in… Continue reading

The result of the Wrangell landslide is seen on Nov. 20. (Alaska Department of Transportation and Public Facilities photo)
Massacre Bay at Attu. the westernmost of Alaska’s Aleutian Island, is seen on Aug. 23. 2017. Waters around the Aleutian Islands recorded their highest winter temperatures since 1900, according to an annual ecosystem status report issued by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s Fisheries Service. (Photo by Lisa Hupp/U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service)

Ecosystem reports show continuing effects of warming in Alaska’s marine waters

Bering Sea, Aleutian Islands and Gulf of Alaska reveal mixed signs for fish stocks.

Massacre Bay at Attu. the westernmost of Alaska’s Aleutian Island, is seen on Aug. 23. 2017. Waters around the Aleutian Islands recorded their highest winter temperatures since 1900, according to an annual ecosystem status report issued by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s Fisheries Service. (Photo by Lisa Hupp/U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service)
Spawning chum salmon swim in a spring feeding the Tanana River, a tributary of the Yukon River. Crashes in Western Alaska chum and Chinook salmon runs are tied to rapid warming that is having myriad effects across the Arctic, as described in the 2023 Arctic Report Card released by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. (Photo by Seth Adams/University of Alaska Fairbanks)

Alaska salmon woes, extreme precipitation, tundra shrub growth part of Arctic transformation

NOAA’s 2023 Arctic Report Card highlights challenges posed by rapid climate change in Alaska

Spawning chum salmon swim in a spring feeding the Tanana River, a tributary of the Yukon River. Crashes in Western Alaska chum and Chinook salmon runs are tied to rapid warming that is having myriad effects across the Arctic, as described in the 2023 Arctic Report Card released by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. (Photo by Seth Adams/University of Alaska Fairbanks)
Strips of chum salmon hang on a drying rack on Aug. 22, 2007. A new study by federal and state biologists identies marine heat waves in the Bering Sea and Gulf of Alaska as the likely culprit in the recent crashes of Western Alaska chum salmon runs. (Photo by S.Zuray / U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service)

Study points to concurrent marine heat waves as culprit in Western Alaska chum declines

Successive marine heat waves appear to have doomed much of the chum salmon swimming in the ocean waters off Alaska in the past year and… Continue reading

Strips of chum salmon hang on a drying rack on Aug. 22, 2007. A new study by federal and state biologists identies marine heat waves in the Bering Sea and Gulf of Alaska as the likely culprit in the recent crashes of Western Alaska chum salmon runs. (Photo by S.Zuray / U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service)
University of Alaska environmental science professor Eran Hood (foreground right) and National Weather Service Juneau hydrologist Aaron Jacobs discuss their hope of renaming Suicide Basin to Kʼóox Ḵaadí Basin, a Tlingit name referring to a small weasel-like mammal in the area — during a presentation Friday at the University of Alaska Southeast. They also discussed the basin’s history, a record flood from it that occurred this summer and the possibility of future such floods. (Mark Sabbatini / Juneau Empire)
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Experts seek to rename Suicide Basin to Kʼóox Ḵaadí Basin; warn its deadly flood threat rising

History, future and monitoring of ice dam that caused record flooding this year focus of UAS event.

University of Alaska environmental science professor Eran Hood (foreground right) and National Weather Service Juneau hydrologist Aaron Jacobs discuss their hope of renaming Suicide Basin to Kʼóox Ḵaadí Basin, a Tlingit name referring to a small weasel-like mammal in the area — during a presentation Friday at the University of Alaska Southeast. They also discussed the basin’s history, a record flood from it that occurred this summer and the possibility of future such floods. (Mark Sabbatini / Juneau Empire)
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Rafters navigate the Mendenhall River in July of 2021. (Photo by John Harley)

Sustainable Alaska: Adventures in a changing climate

It’s difficult to quantify and rank the threats of climate change — how do you weigh the complete collapse of a Yukon salmon run against… Continue reading

Rafters navigate the Mendenhall River in July of 2021. (Photo by John Harley)
A person walks across the dock at St. Paul Harbor, Thursday, June 22, 2023, in Kodiak. Alaska fishermen will be able to harvest red king crab, the largest and most lucrative of all the Bering Sea crab species, for the first time in two years, offering a slight reprieve to the beleaguered fishery beset by low numbers likely exacerbated by climate change. (AP Photo/Joshua A. Bickel, File)

Alaska fishermen will be allowed to harvest lucrative red king crab in the Bering Sea

Catch allowed after two canceled seasons; snow crab fishery to remain closed for second year.

A person walks across the dock at St. Paul Harbor, Thursday, June 22, 2023, in Kodiak. Alaska fishermen will be able to harvest red king crab, the largest and most lucrative of all the Bering Sea crab species, for the first time in two years, offering a slight reprieve to the beleaguered fishery beset by low numbers likely exacerbated by climate change. (AP Photo/Joshua A. Bickel, File)
Simple weatherization techniques, like improving insulation and plugging up gaps in your home, can help homeowners lower their energy costs. Alaska Heat Smart, offer free home heating assessments, which analyze homes and their energy use to create a report about potential heat pump installation options, and weatherization suggestions. (Bethany Goodrich/ Sustainable Southeast Partnership)

Exploring needs and opportunities on anniversary of Inflation Reduction Act

Tips on using federal and regional incentives for a clean energy future for Southeast Alaskans.

Simple weatherization techniques, like improving insulation and plugging up gaps in your home, can help homeowners lower their energy costs. Alaska Heat Smart, offer free home heating assessments, which analyze homes and their energy use to create a report about potential heat pump installation options, and weatherization suggestions. (Bethany Goodrich/ Sustainable Southeast Partnership)
Youth plaintiffs in the climate change lawsuit, Held vs. Montana, arrive at the Lewis and Clark County Courthouse, on June 20, 2023, in Helena, Mont., for the final day of the trial. A Montana judge on Monday sided with young environmental activists who said state agencies were violating their constitutional right to a clean and healthful environment by permitting fossil fuel development without considering its effect on the climate. (Thom Bridge/Independent Record via AP, File)

Victors in landmark climate change lawsuit reset sights on Alaska

Montana ruling establishes youths’ rights to clean environment, after similar case failed in Alaska.

Youth plaintiffs in the climate change lawsuit, Held vs. Montana, arrive at the Lewis and Clark County Courthouse, on June 20, 2023, in Helena, Mont., for the final day of the trial. A Montana judge on Monday sided with young environmental activists who said state agencies were violating their constitutional right to a clean and healthful environment by permitting fossil fuel development without considering its effect on the climate. (Thom Bridge/Independent Record via AP, File)
A sign marks a house along the Mendenhall River that is condemned following a glacial dam outburst Saturday that resulted in weekend flooding along the river. (AP Photo/Becky Bohrer)

Bursting ice dam in Juneau highlights risks of glacial flooding around the globe

The gray, two-story home with white trim toppled and slid, crashing into the river below as rushing waters carried off a bobbing chunk of its… Continue reading

A sign marks a house along the Mendenhall River that is condemned following a glacial dam outburst Saturday that resulted in weekend flooding along the river. (AP Photo/Becky Bohrer)
Sunsets started to tease the Arctic horizon as scientists on board the U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Healy headed south in the Chukchi Sea during the final days collecting ocean data for the 2011 ICESCAPE mission. (Photo by NASA/Kathryn Hansen)

Opinion: Action to protect the Arctic could slow climate change

As a scorching wake-up call reverberated around the globe, climate scientists urged accelerated action in the Arctic to help slow the rate of warming and… Continue reading

Sunsets started to tease the Arctic horizon as scientists on board the U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Healy headed south in the Chukchi Sea during the final days collecting ocean data for the 2011 ICESCAPE mission. (Photo by NASA/Kathryn Hansen)
Marian Call and Conor Lendrum perform a song during the annual Climate Fair for a Cooler Planet on Saturday afternoon at Overstreet Park. (Meredith Jordan / Juneau Empire)

Seriousness about climate change amid a festive backdrop

Canadian wildfires, proposed North Slope projects draw heat at Climate Fair for a Cooler Planet

Marian Call and Conor Lendrum perform a song during the annual Climate Fair for a Cooler Planet on Saturday afternoon at Overstreet Park. (Meredith Jordan / Juneau Empire)
Dancers rehearsed in front of “Tahku,” the whale sculpture ahead of the Climate Fair for a Cool Planet in 2021. (Courtesy of Mike Tobin)

My Turn: Fair time to advocate for a cool planet

The Climate Fair for a Cool Planet is coming up on Saturday, Aug. 5, from 3-5 p.m. at the Whale in Overstreet Park. You might… Continue reading

Dancers rehearsed in front of “Tahku,” the whale sculpture ahead of the Climate Fair for a Cool Planet in 2021. (Courtesy of Mike Tobin)
An employee at Barnacle Foods in Juneau chops up bull kelp as it makes it was down a conveyor belt. The company is among many in Alaska seeking to use kelp for a variety of commercial and scientific purposes.(Clarise Larson / Juneau Empire file photo)

Seeking the rich rewards of sustainability

Economic as well as environmental prospects emphasized at second annual energy conference

An employee at Barnacle Foods in Juneau chops up bull kelp as it makes it was down a conveyor belt. The company is among many in Alaska seeking to use kelp for a variety of commercial and scientific purposes.(Clarise Larson / Juneau Empire file photo)
Vera Metcalf stands on Wednesday by a chunk of sea ice transported from Utqiagvik and displayed at the Arctic Encounter Symposium. The melting ice, which started at 310 pounds, symbolizes the rapid climate change that is weaking the Arctic ice pack, with profound implications for ecosystems, communties and cultures. (Photo by Yereth Rosen / Alaska Beacon)

Sea ice, critical to ecosystems and communities, looms large at Alaska conference

Suspended in netting in a downtown Anchorage building is a potent symbol of Arctic climate change: a chunk of sea ice that started at 310… Continue reading

Vera Metcalf stands on Wednesday by a chunk of sea ice transported from Utqiagvik and displayed at the Arctic Encounter Symposium. The melting ice, which started at 310 pounds, symbolizes the rapid climate change that is weaking the Arctic ice pack, with profound implications for ecosystems, communties and cultures. (Photo by Yereth Rosen / Alaska Beacon)
Bob Schroeder takes an electric chainsaw to a mock credit card during a protest outside the Wells Fargo in downtown Juneau at midday Tuesday. Schroeder cut up three mock credit cards representing three banks in Juneau protesters say are leading funders of fossil fuel development projects. (Mark Sabbatini / Juneau Empire)

Chainsaw reaction: Protesters object to banks financing fossil fuel projects

Demonstration uses electric tool to cut up giant credit cards.

Bob Schroeder takes an electric chainsaw to a mock credit card during a protest outside the Wells Fargo in downtown Juneau at midday Tuesday. Schroeder cut up three mock credit cards representing three banks in Juneau protesters say are leading funders of fossil fuel development projects. (Mark Sabbatini / Juneau Empire)
Chunks of ice break off the Perito Moreno Glacier, in Lake Argentina, at Los Glaciares National Park, near El Calafate, in Argentina's Patagonia region, March 10, 2016. As glaciers melt and pour massive amounts of water into nearby lakes, 15 million people across the globe live under the threat of a sudden and deadly outburst flood, a new study finds. (AP Photo / Francisco Munoz)

Study: 15 million people live under threat of glacial floods

More than half of those are in just four countries: India, Pakistan, Peru and China.

Chunks of ice break off the Perito Moreno Glacier, in Lake Argentina, at Los Glaciares National Park, near El Calafate, in Argentina's Patagonia region, March 10, 2016. As glaciers melt and pour massive amounts of water into nearby lakes, 15 million people across the globe live under the threat of a sudden and deadly outburst flood, a new study finds. (AP Photo / Francisco Munoz)