Courtesy Photos | Amy Gulick                                An Alaska Native Elder hangs salmon at her family’s Strait Slough fish camp on the Kuskokwim River.

Courtesy Photos | Amy Gulick An Alaska Native Elder hangs salmon at her family’s Strait Slough fish camp on the Kuskokwim River.

Your guide to First Friday: Salmon photos, hands-on weaving, a suffrage celebration and more

February First Friday fun.

JAHC: Wearable Art Retrospective, Juneau Arts & Culture Center, 350 Whittier St, 4:30-7 p.m. The Juneau Arts and Humanities Council is proud to present a retrospective of the last 20 years of Wearable Art in Juneau. Stop by to see works from previous shows, artists sketches, poster, photography and more.

Exhibit up through the month.

The Davis Gallery: The Portrait Society, Centennial Hall, 101 Egan Drive, 4:30-7 p.m. Juneau Arts and Humanities Council will host a show of works by Alaskan members of the Portrait Society of America at the Davis Gallery. Participating artists: Nancy Angelini Crawford of Wasilla, Donna Catotti of Haines, Barbara Craver of Juneau, Yuko Hays of Haines, MK MacNaughton of Juneau, Beverly Schupp of Haines and Susan Swiderski of Seward.

Exhibit up through the month.

Kindred Post: February First Friday at Kindred Post: Chilkat-Tunic-Fringe Zipper-Pull DIY with Lily Hope, 145 S. Franklin St, 4:30-7:30 p.m. Come wrap real Chilkat warp with merino yarns to make your own zipper pull (or purse/backpack bling). All materials and live instruction included. Lily Hope’s latest woven geometric earring collection will be present to browse, too.

First Friday only.

Completed Chilkat tunic fringe zipper pulls lay on a table at the Tlingit and Haida Community Center, Sunday, Jan. 20. (Ben Hohenstatt | Capital City Weekly File)

Completed Chilkat tunic fringe zipper pulls lay on a table at the Tlingit and Haida Community Center, Sunday, Jan. 20. (Ben Hohenstatt | Capital City Weekly File)

Alaska State Library, Archives, and Museum: Opening of Sara Tabbert’s solo exhibit, “Lowlands,” and “Women of Vision: Honoring the 19th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution,” 395 Whittier St., 4:30-7 p.m. Sara Tabbert of Fairbanks, one of eight artists selected for the Museum’s Solo Artist Exhibition Series 2017-2020, creates woodblock prints and panels that reveal oft-overlooked subjects and environments. Her exhibit “Lowlands” highlights new sculptural skills and techniques that explore the strange and beautiful landscapes of interior Alaska. “Women of Vision: Honoring the 19th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution” features highlights from Museum’s collection by women artists over the past century.

First Friday only.

Sealaska Heritage: Featured artists in the lobby, free admission to SHI’s exhibits, Walter Soboloff Building, 105 S. Seward St. 4:30-8 p.m. Sealaska Heritage will feature two artists in the lobby of the Walter Soboleff Building and will offer free admission to its two exhibits, “War & Peace” and “Our Grandparents Names on the Land.”

Fist Friday only.

Juneau-Douglas City Museum: Photography by Ben Huff, Opening Reception, 114 W. 4th St. 4:30-7 p.m. Ben Huff’s photography exhibit, “The Light that Got Lost,” is a collection of pictures from Huff’s time spent on the Juneau icefield and surrounding glaciers, both on his own expeditions, and as a faculty member with the Juneau Icefield Research Program. On Saturday, Feb. 8 Huff will discuss his show during Coffee & Collections from 10:30 a.m.-noon. Both events take place at the city museum and are free.

First Friday Opening only.

Annie Kaill’s: Kate Diebels, Artist, 124 Seward St., 4:30-7 p.m. Annie Kaill’s February 2020 featured artist will be Kate Diebels.

A Juneau artist, Diebel’s show will feature her original paintings in watercolor and acrylic. She enjoys taking in all the Juneau beauty and trying to capture that with paint.

Exhibit up through the month.

Rainforest Yoga: First Friday Yoga with Bev Ingram, 171 Shattuck Way, Suite 202B, 5:15-6:15 p.m. This free first Friday class will offer nourishment and deep contentment to body, mind and spirit. They will practice gentle movements and restorative poses for resting and allowing yourself to be fully supported. Bev Ingram will teach this class. She has been a serious yoga seeker and teacher for many years.

First Friday only.

The Alaskan Bar, 167 N. Franklin St., 6:30-8:30 p.m. Live Hawaiian songs and hula dancers from a local group of Native Hawaiians and Haole’s performing at the Alaskan Bar’s February First Friday event. Ukuleles, guitars and traditional songs from Hawaii.

First Friday only.

Devil’s Club Brewing Co: The Salmon Way by Amy Gulick Photographer and Author, 100 N. Franklin St., 3-8 p.m. Photographer and author Amy Gulick traveled throughout Alaska to explore the web of human relationships that revolve around these remarkable fish. Commercial fishermen took her on as crew; Alaska Native families taught her the art of preserving fish and culture; and sport fishing guides showed her where to cast her line as well as her mind. The exhibit features photographs from her new book, “The Salmon Way: An Alaska State of Mind.” Amy will be on hand to sign books, share stories and raise a glass to the salmon way of life in Alaska.

A newly hatched salmon is called an alevin. At this stage, the young fish retains the egg’s yolk sac as a nutrient-rich “lunch bag” that is eventually absorbed.

A newly hatched salmon is called an alevin. At this stage, the young fish retains the egg’s yolk sac as a nutrient-rich “lunch bag” that is eventually absorbed.

Exhibit up through the month.

Harbor Tea & Spice: Winter Spices and Tea, 175 S. Franklin St., 4:30-7:30 p.m. There will be curry blends and garam masala chocolate as well as chocolate reserve balsamic vinegar — and of course — there will be a hot tea or two.

First Friday only.

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