Gov. Bill Walker signs an Executive Order in his Capitol conference room on Tuesday, Oct. 31, 2017, outlining his administration’s policy on climate change and creating the Climate Action for Alaska Leadership Team. Standing behind Gov. Walker are Department of Commerce, Community & Economic Development Deputy Commissioner Fred Parady, left, Attorney General Jahna Lindemuth, Lt. Gov. Byron Mallott, Department of Environmental Conservation Commissioner Larry Hartig and Senior Advisor on Climate Change Dr. Nikoosh Carlo. (Michael Penn | Juneau Empire File)

Gov. Bill Walker signs an Executive Order in his Capitol conference room on Tuesday, Oct. 31, 2017, outlining his administration’s policy on climate change and creating the Climate Action for Alaska Leadership Team. Standing behind Gov. Walker are Department of Commerce, Community & Economic Development Deputy Commissioner Fred Parady, left, Attorney General Jahna Lindemuth, Lt. Gov. Byron Mallott, Department of Environmental Conservation Commissioner Larry Hartig and Senior Advisor on Climate Change Dr. Nikoosh Carlo. (Michael Penn | Juneau Empire File)

Walker names members of climate change advisory panel

Gov. Bill Walker on Tuesday morning announced the members of his climate change advisory board.

The board, established by an executive order on Halloween, has been charged with recommending ways to deal with the effects of climate change on Alaska. Its recommendations are due September 2018, but the governor is not required to act on those recommendations. The board will be chaired by Lt. Gov. Byron Mallott and includes members from across the state.

In an official statement, the governor’s office said more than 100 applications for the team were received during the two-week window to apply. The first meeting of the advisory board will take place Dec. 18 in Anchorage.

In addition to 15 public members, the board will include five members of the executive branch. The public members:

• Ralph Andersen of Dillingham. Andersen is president and CEO of Bristol Bay Native Association.

• Linda Behnken of Sitka. Behnken is director of the Alaska Longline Fishermen’s Association.

• Lisa Busch of Sitka. Busch directs the Sitka Sound Science Center.

• Luke Hopkins of Fairbanks. Hopkins is a former Fairbanks North Star Borough Mayor.

• John Hopson Jr. of Wainwright. Hopson is Mayor of Wainwright and President of the North Slope Borough Assembly, as well as chairman of the Eskimo Whaling Commission.

• Nicole Kanayurak of Utqiaġvik. Kanayurak is youth representative to the Inuit Circumpolar Council.

• Mara Kimmel of Anchorage. Kimmel is on the faculty of the Institute of Social and Economic Research at the University of Alaska Anchorage.

• Meera Kohler of Anchorage. Kohler is president and CEO of the Alaska Village Electric Cooperative and was a member of Gov. Sarah Palin’s climate change sub-cabinet.

• Michael LeVine of Juneau. LeVine is Senior Arctic Fellow for the Ocean Conservancy.

• Mark Masteller of Palmer. Masteller is an assistant professor at the University of Alaska who teaches classes on energy efficiency and renewable energy.

• Molly McCammon of Anchorage. McCammon directs the Alaska Ocean Observing System, a network of climate and weather sensors across Alaska.

• Denise Michels of Nome. Michels is a former Nome mayor.

• Chris Rose of Anchorage. Rose is director of the Rewnewable Energy Alaska Project and was a member of Gov. Sarah Palin’s climate change sub-cabinet.

• Isaac Vanderburg of Anchoarge. Vanderburg directs Launch Alaska, a “energy accelerator” company that supports other companies working on climate issues.

• Janet Weiss of Anchorage. Weiss is the president of BP’s Alaska region.

The board roster also includes five non-voting members. Among those non-voting members is Fran Ulmer.


• Contact reporter James Brooks at james.k.brooks@juneauempire.com or call 523-2258.


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