Rotarians Candy Behrends and Diane Kyser smile while talking about a planned assemblage art show and building contest near pieces of art made from household items, Tuesday, March 12, 2019. (Ben Hohenstatt | Juneau Empire)

Rotarians Candy Behrends and Diane Kyser smile while talking about a planned assemblage art show and building contest near pieces of art made from household items, Tuesday, March 12, 2019. (Ben Hohenstatt | Juneau Empire)

Turning trash to treasure: New event includes art show and building contest using collected scrap

Event benefits Juneau-Gastineau Rotary Club’s youth programs

It’s part art show, part contest and all new.

Juneau-Gastineau Rotary’s Assemblage Recycle Competition will feature both a juried art showing as well as a competition that will task teams of four with making a piece out of recycled materials.

“We started on this whole contest idea, and the more we got it polished, the more we realized there wasn’t anything like it we’d seen — anything like it we could find on the internet — it’s kind of a brand new idea,” Rotarian Candy Behrends said. “Instead of having junk that goes into the landfill, you’re making art.”

A small assemblage art spider made by Candy Behrends stands in front of other small, assemblage art pieces, Tuesday, March 12, 2019. (Ben Hohenstatt| Juneau Empire)

A small assemblage art spider made by Candy Behrends stands in front of other small, assemblage art pieces, Tuesday, March 12, 2019. (Ben Hohenstatt| Juneau Empire)

Behrends and Rotarian Diane Kyser said the event is placing an emphasis on creativity through a Science, Technology, Engineering and Math lens, and it is meant to appeal to people of all ages.

“We don’t have enough family events in this town,” Kyser said.

The event, which is hoped to become annual, is scheduled for 1:30-5 p.m. Saturday, March 23 at Juneau Arts & Culture Center, 350 Whittier St.

Assemblage Recycle Competition is a fundraiser for Juneau-Gastineau Rotary Club, and all proceeds will go toward the club’s youth activities and programs.

General admission is $5, and $25 to register to compete in the building portion of the event.

“We’ve been working like crazy to get our ideas sorted out, our rules made and how the competition would work,” Behrends said. “It’s kind of like ‘Iron Chef’ or ‘Cake Wars’ or one of those cooking shows.”

Materials will be provided as will some tools, and Rotarian Diane Kyser and Behrends said competitors can expect some twists and additional challenges along the way, as is common in reality TV shows. For those who feel inspired to make creations at home, Kyser and Behrends said bags of assorted materials will be available for sale at the event.

Up to 12 teams of four may compete and teams must include at least one member over the age of 18. They will have 90 minutes to build an art piece out of components collected by Rotarians.

Behrends and Kyser suggested three members of each team focus on building while one member serves as a parts runner, but that isn’t a requirement.

A full list of competition rules and information about what tools and adhesives will be available or can be brought and used is available online at https://portal.clubrunner.ca/386/Stories/assemblages-recycle-competition-(arc). Registration forms are also available at that site.

“There’s still some slots open,” Behrends said.

Leading up to the event, Kyser and Behrends have tried their hands at building assemblage art pieces although neither will compete in the event.

“We’ve had a hoot doing this,” Kyser said.

Rotarian Diane Kyser smile said she was able to create her smiley, curly-haired statue in a single morning although a load-bearing bottle of Tabasco sauce was required to keep it standing, Tuesday, March 12, 2019. (Ben Hohenstatt | Juneau Empire)

Rotarian Diane Kyser smile said she was able to create her smiley, curly-haired statue in a single morning although a load-bearing bottle of Tabasco sauce was required to keep it standing, Tuesday, March 12, 2019. (Ben Hohenstatt | Juneau Empire)

Once teams have made their assemblage piece, a winner will be selected via audience vote.

The art show portion of the event will be open to up to 15 pieces, Behrends and Kyser said.

Registration for that costs $35 if the piece is just being shown.

“If they want to sell it, there is no fee, but Rotary gets 30 percent (of the sale price),” Behrends said.

While event organizers said their preference is teams register ahead of the event, if there are still openings, it could be possible for people to register the day of Assemblage Recycle Competition.

“This is Juneau,” Behrends said. “People don’t RSVP. They’re kind of last minute.”

Know & Go

What: Juneau-Gastineau Rotary’s Assemblage Recycle Competition

When: 1:30-5 p.m. Saturday, March 23

Where: Juneau Arts & Culture Center, 350 Whittier St.

Admission: General admission is $5, and $25 to register to compete in the building portion of the event. Registration for the art show costs $35 if the piece is just being shown. There is no fee for a piece that will be for sale, but the Rotary Club keeps 30 percent of the sale.


• Contact arts and culture reporter Ben Hohenstatt at (907)523-2243 or bhohenstatt@juneauempire.com. Follow him on Twitter at @BenHohenstatt.


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