Justin McDonald attends with Native women holding up red dresses to symbolize missing and murdered indigenous women during the Women’s March on Juneau in front of the Alaska State Capitol on Saturday, Jan. 19, 2019. (Michael Penn | Juneau Empire)

Justin McDonald attends with Native women holding up red dresses to symbolize missing and murdered indigenous women during the Women’s March on Juneau in front of the Alaska State Capitol on Saturday, Jan. 19, 2019. (Michael Penn | Juneau Empire)

Murder is the third leading cause of death among Alaska Native women. Here’s what Lisa Murkowski is doing about it

The ‘Not Invisible Act of 2019’ would improve coordination across federal agencies

U.S. Sen. Lisa Murkowski, R-Alaska, is a part of a group of senators who introduced a bill in Congress on Wednesday that addresses the crisis of missing, trafficked and murdered indigenous women.

The Not Invisible Act of 2019 is legislation that would engage law enforcement, tribal leaders, federal partners, and service providers and improve coordination across federal agencies, according to a press release.

“Human trafficking is a horrifying reality across the state of Alaska and is disproportionately affecting our Alaska Native communities. This legislation paves the way for greater collaboration between federal agencies, law enforcement, and elected tribal officials, ensuring Alaska Natives have a voice in developing methods to end these horrible crimes,” Murkowski said in the release.

The bipartisan bill establishes an advisory committee of local, tribal and federal stakeholders to make recommendations to the Department of Interior and Department of Justice on best practices to combat the epidemic of disappearances, homicide, violent crime and trafficking of Native Americans and Alaska Natives.

The National Institute of Justice estimates that 56 percent of American Indian and Alaska Native women experience sexual violence in their lifetimes. In addition, murder is the third leading cause of death among American Indian and Alaska Native women, according to data in the legislation.

[Sitka woman testifies in Washington, D.C. about missing, murdered Alaska Native women]

• To combat that crisis, specifically, the Not Invisible Act: Requires the Secretary of the Interior to designate an official within the Office of Justice Services in the Bureau of Indian Affairs to coordinate violent crime prevention efforts across federal agencies.

• Requires the Secretary of the Interior, in coordination with the Attorney General, to establish an advisory committee on violent crime composed of members including tribal, state, and local law enforcement, service providers, representatives of relevant federal agencies, tribal leaders, and survivors and family members.

The Committee will identify legislative, administrative, training and staffing changes to increase reporting and prosecutions of relevant crimes. It will also develop best practices for tribes and law enforcement to better collect and share information across systems and agencies and then make recommendations to the DOI and DOJ on what more can be done to combat violent crime.

The Not Invisible Act is supported by the National Indigenous Women’s Resource Center (NIWRC) and is cosponsored by two other U.S. Senators, Catherine Cortez Masto, D-Nevada and Jon Tester, D-Montana.

[Photos: Missing indigenous women at forefront of Juneau’s women’s march]

“Through partnerships, coordination and pooling resources we can turn the tide of women and girls falling victim to sex trafficking,” said Murkowski in a press release. “I am proud to work with Senator Cortez Masto to build upon our efforts to shine a spotlight and address the issue of missing and murdered indigenous women and drive legislation that will help end human trafficking of our American Indian and Alaska Native populations once and for all.”

In this March 13, 2018, file photo, Sen. Lisa Murkowski, R-Alaska, speaks during a hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin, File)

In this March 13, 2018, file photo, Sen. Lisa Murkowski, R-Alaska, speaks during a hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin, File)

Native women hold up red dresses to symbolize missing and murdered indigenous women during the Women’s March on Juneau in front of the Alaska State Capitol on Saturday, Jan. 19, 2019. (Michael Penn | Juneau Empire)

Native women hold up red dresses to symbolize missing and murdered indigenous women during the Women’s March on Juneau in front of the Alaska State Capitol on Saturday, Jan. 19, 2019. (Michael Penn | Juneau Empire)

Murder is the third leading cause of death among Alaska Native women. Here’s what Lisa Murkowski is doing about it

Native women hold up red dresses to symbolize missing and murdered indigenous women during the Women’s March on Juneau in front of the Alaska State Capitol on Saturday, Jan. 19, 2019. (Michael Penn | Juneau Empire)

More in News

teeaassee
Firefighters respond to a Friday night fire

At about 10:30 p.m., CCFR responded to a residential fire on the 8000 block of Thunder Street.

Rep. Don Young, R-Alaska. (courtesy photo)
Election 2020: A conversation with U.S. House Rep. Don Young

The congressman discusses economics, oil and the stimulus

Capital Transit is tightening passenger limits in response to raised community risk levels, Oct. 22, 2020. (Michael Penn / Juneau Empire File)
Risk level means new limits for city buses

Fewer passengers will be allowed in busses and vans.

This is a police car.  It has always been a police car.
Police calls for Friday, Oct. 23, 2020

This report contains public information from law enforcement and public safety agencies.

This is a police car. It has always been a police car.
Police calls for Thursday, Oct. 22, 2020

This report contains public information from law enforcement and public safety agencies.

The Fairweather pulls up to the Auke Bay Terminal in June 2014. (Michael Penn / Juneau Empire File)
State accepts bids for 2 fast ferries that faced struggles

The state Department of Transportation issued a public notice of the bidding process Thursday.

Most Read