Juneau’s Innovation Summit begins registration

The Juneau Economic Development Council opened registration for the fifth annual Innovation Summit, which will take place Feb. 8-9, 2016.

The summit will feature national and international experts, Alaskan political and business leaders and in-depth panel discussions meant to spark new thinking around Alaska’s economic future.

The 2016 keynote speakers include: Dr. Christian Ketels, an expert in regional development and professor at Harvard Business School’s Institute for Strategy and Competitiveness; and Michael Shuman, an economist focused on investing in local economy and small business. Alaskan innovators in government and business will also be featured at the summit, including Path to Prosperity finalists and winners.

The conference recently received a 2015 Innovation Award from the National Association of Development Organizations Research Foundation, in addition to receiving a 2013 award from the International Economic Development Council.

The conference is designed by the JEDC with key support from Haa Aani, Sealaska, Juneau Hydropower, Alaska Airlines, Alaska Communications, Avista, Wells Fargo and many partnering individuals and organizations.

JEDC invites leaders in all industries and government sectors interested in developing innovative ideas for economic success in Alaska to attend. The fee to attend the two-day event is $295, which includes meals, networking and break-out sessions. To view the full agenda or to register visit JEDC.org/innovation.

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