A sign on the doors of the Alaskan Hotel and Bar in downtown Juneau letting customers know of a temporary closure. (Peter Segall / Juneau Empire)

A sign on the doors of the Alaskan Hotel and Bar in downtown Juneau letting customers know of a temporary closure. (Peter Segall / Juneau Empire)

City announces bars to close to indoor service, restaurants require reservations

Announcement made Friday evening.

Bars will close for inside service and restaurants will operate at reduced capacity due to rising COVID-19 transmission, City and Borough of Juneau announced.

As of noon Saturday, Sept. 12, bars are required to close for indoor service and restaurants must reduce indoor capacity to 50% of normal levels and require reservations, the city said in a news release. Juneau’s emergency operations center raised the city’s overall community risk level to Level 3 High, which triggers the new mitigation measures.

Earlier this week, the city announced an outbreak related to a late-August social gathering connected to multiple confirmed cases among bar employees and advised people who had socialized at bars to get tested for the coronavirus.

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