This is a photo collage of the candidates running for local office in the 2023 City and Borough of Juneau municipal election. (Clarise Larson / Juneau Empire)

This is a photo collage of the candidates running for local office in the 2023 City and Borough of Juneau municipal election. (Clarise Larson / Juneau Empire)

2023 Juneau Election Guide

Here’s what you need to know ahead of the City and Borough of Juneau’s Oct. 3 local election.

This article has been moved in front of the Juneau Empire’s paywall.

The 2023 municipal Election Day is fast approaching in the City and Borough of Juneau.

The Juneau Empire has been active in covering the candidates and the proposition set to appear on local ballots ahead of the big day. Check out the links below for our coverage of all things local election.

Key times, dates and places for Juneau’s 2023 local election

Election Day: Tuesday, Oct. 3. Vote centers open 7 a.m.-8 p.m.

Final day to register: Sunday, Sept. 3.

By-mail voting: Ballots will be mailed Sept. 14 to voters on file. Ballots can be returned to one of the two Juneau Vote Centers, to one of two secure drop boxes or via USPS. (Must be mailed no later than Election Day.)

Vote Centers: City Hall Assembly Chambers, Mendenhall Valley Public Library. Varying hours.

Secure Ballot Drop Boxes: Auke Bay-Statter Harbor boat launch parking lot, Douglas Library/Fire Hall Community Building.

Temporary address voting applications: Must be received by the city clerk’s office no later than Sept. 26.

Candidate Forums: Multiple candidate forums have already occurred this election cycle and more are on the way. Read past coverage of forums here. The League of Women Voters of Juneau, KTOO, KINY and the Juneau Empire are joining forces to host two upcoming candidate forums on Tuesday, Sept. 12, at 6 p.m. for Assembly candidates, and Wednesday, Sept. 13, at 6 p.m. for school board candidates and the ballot proposition. Residents are welcome to come in-person to watch the forums at KTOO, listen on KTOO 104.3 FM or watch the livestream.

(Courtesy / KTOO)

(Courtesy / KTOO)

About the ballot proposition

Ballot Proposition 1 — the only one on the ballot this fall — asks voters whether to approve $27 million in bond debt to fund the construction of a new City Hall, estimated to cost a total of $43.3 million. Read more about it here.

This is a preliminary design concept of the proposed new City Hall estimated to cost $43.3 million. (Courtesy / City and Borough of Juneau)

This is a preliminary design concept of the proposed new City Hall estimated to cost $43.3 million. (Courtesy / City and Borough of Juneau)

About the candidates

The Empire sat down with each of the 17 candidates running for the open Assembly and Board of Education seats to learn more about them and their reasons behind running for local office. Click the name of each candidate to learn more about them along with a Q&A.

This is a photo collage of the candidates running for local office in the 2023 City and Borough of Juneau municipal election. (Clarise Larson / Juneau Empire)

This is a photo collage of the candidates running for local office in the 2023 City and Borough of Juneau municipal election. (Clarise Larson / Juneau Empire)

— Areawide Assembly

Ella Adkison

JoAnn Wallace

Paul Kelly

Emily Mesch

Laura Martinson McDonnell

Michele Stuart-Morgan

Ivan Nance

Dorene Lorenz

Nano Brooks

Jeff Jones

— District 1 Assembly

Joe Geldhof

Alicia Hughes-Skandijs (incumbent)

— District 2 Assembly

David Morris

Christine Woll (incumbent)

— Board of Education

Britteny Cioni-Haywood

Paige Sipniewski

David Noon

What is the Assembly and what does it do?

The Assembly is the governing body of the City and Borough of Juneau. Its members hold the legislative and policy-making powers of the city, and are largely responsible for setting policies, and directing them to the city manager and staff to enact. Those policies include topics like housing, child care, tourism and taxes.

Though the Assembly approves its policy decisions during its regular meetings, it often tackles much of its work in committees that focus on specific facets of municipal issues such as finances, housing and economic development, public works and facilities, and human resources.

The Assembly is made up of nine Juneau residents — including the mayor — all of whom are elected by voters during the annual municipal elections. Juneau is unique in that it is one of only four unified home-rule municipalities in Alaska, meaning it consolidates city and county functions. Once elected, an Assembly member serves in their role for a staggered three-year term and members are allowed to serve a maximum of three consecutive, three-year terms.

On the ballot this year there are 14 people seeking four open Assembly seats. The four seats are to fill positions currently held by members Maria Gladziszewski (areawide), Alicia Hughes-Skandijs (District 1), Christine Woll (District 2) and recently resigned Carole Triem (areawide) whose seat is temporarily filled by previous Assembly member Loren Jones until the election.

Hughes-Skandijs and Woll are running for reelection as both are eligible for two additional three-year terms after their terms expire this October. However, Gladziszewski will term out of her position come October.

According to CBJ Code, Assembly members are compensated $750 per month — which will increase to $1,000 beginning in 2025 — and the mayor is compensated $3,500 per month.

What is the Board of Education and what does it do?

The Board of Education is largely responsible for setting the general policy for how the Juneau School District operates its public schools. Those responsibilities include numerous facets such as educational policy decisions like approval of curriculum study guides, materials and textbooks. It also is responsible for proposing the district’s annual budget, and making decisions and recommendations on school management like maintenance and other capital improvement projects.

The board is made up of seven Juneau residents, all of whom are elected by voters during the annual municipal elections. Once elected, board members serve in their role for a three-year term. Unlike the Assembly, there is no term limit for school board positions.

On the ballot this year there are three people seeking two open board seats. The two seats open are currently occupied by Martin Stepetin Sr. and Brian Holst. Stepetin did not file as a candidate and Holst rescinded his candidacy just days after filing in July.

Board members are compensated $270 per month and the board president is compensated $337.50 per month.

What readers are saying about this election

The election and ballot proposition have generated many My Turns and letters to the editor over the past few weeks. You can find My Turns here and letters to the editor here.

• Contact reporter Clarise Larson at clarise.larson@juneauempire.com or (651) 528-1807.

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