Alaska Outdoors

Courtesy Photo | Kyle Joly                                 Caribou cross the Kobuk River in northwestern Alaska.

Meet Alaska’s long-distance champions

They log thousands of miles each year.

Courtesy Photo | Kyle Joly                                 Caribou cross the Kobuk River in northwestern Alaska.
This July 2019 photo provided by Peter Westley shows the carcass of a chum salmon along the shore of the Koyukuk River near Huslia, Alaska, July 2019 was the hottest month ever recorded in the state. Global warming looks like it will be a far bigger problem for the world’s fish species than scientists first thought, since a study led by Dr. Flemming Dahlke released on Thursday, July 2, 2020 shows that when fish are spawning or are embryos they are far more vulnerable to hotter water. (Peter Westley | University of Alaska Fairbanks)

Fish more vulnerable to warming water than first thought

Study shows that when fish are spawning or are embryos they are more vulnerable to hotter water.

This July 2019 photo provided by Peter Westley shows the carcass of a chum salmon along the shore of the Koyukuk River near Huslia, Alaska, July 2019 was the hottest month ever recorded in the state. Global warming looks like it will be a far bigger problem for the world’s fish species than scientists first thought, since a study led by Dr. Flemming Dahlke released on Thursday, July 2, 2020 shows that when fish are spawning or are embryos they are far more vulnerable to hotter water. (Peter Westley | University of Alaska Fairbanks)
Rare documentation of when Jeff Lund remembered his headlamp. (Jeff Lund | For the Juneau Empire)

10,000 hours doesn’t always make for an expert

Malcolm Gladwell must’ve been talking about someone else.

Rare documentation of when Jeff Lund remembered his headlamp. (Jeff Lund | For the Juneau Empire)
This March 25, 2020, file photo shows a small load of pollack being sorted as it comes off a boat at the Portland Fish Exchange in Portland, Maine. The amount of commercial fishing taking place worldwide has dipped since the start of the coronavirus pandemic, but scientists and conservation experts say it’s unclear if the slowdown will help jeopardized species of sea life to recover. (AP Photo/Robert F. Bukaty)

Worldwide slowdown in fishing unlikely to save rare species

Commercial fishing taking place worldwide has dipped since the start of the coronavirus pandemic.

This March 25, 2020, file photo shows a small load of pollack being sorted as it comes off a boat at the Portland Fish Exchange in Portland, Maine. The amount of commercial fishing taking place worldwide has dipped since the start of the coronavirus pandemic, but scientists and conservation experts say it’s unclear if the slowdown will help jeopardized species of sea life to recover. (AP Photo/Robert F. Bukaty)
This harbor seal pup from Juneau is one of six to be admitted to the Alaska SeaLife Center in Seward. (Courtesy Photo | SeaLife Center)

Juneau pup 1 of 6 admitted to SeaLife Center

Seal team six.

This harbor seal pup from Juneau is one of six to be admitted to the Alaska SeaLife Center in Seward. (Courtesy Photo | SeaLife Center)
Water droplets sit on a blade of grass following a rainy period in Interior Alaska. (Courtesy Photo | Ned Rozell)

Rain falls, as it always has

Rain is, after all, the free distribution of a substance more valuable than gold.

Water droplets sit on a blade of grass following a rainy period in Interior Alaska. (Courtesy Photo | Ned Rozell)
Triston Chaney and his brother sit aboard their grandpa’s gill-netter in Bristol Bay. (Courtesy Photo | Triston Chaney)

An interview with a lifelong fisherman

“When the salmon are running, we can catch all we want pretty quickly.”

Triston Chaney and his brother sit aboard their grandpa’s gill-netter in Bristol Bay. (Courtesy Photo | Triston Chaney)
A moose with no name: Contest to be held for new fire-prevention mascot

A moose with no name: Contest to be held for new fire-prevention mascot

Move over, Smokey. Division of Forestry seeks name for mascot.

A moose with no name: Contest to be held for new fire-prevention mascot
Mallards stand near the pond at Rotary Park, June 21, 2020. (Ben Hohenstatt | Juneau Empire)

Fun at home — Looking out the windows

Busy birds and bears.

Mallards stand near the pond at Rotary Park, June 21, 2020. (Ben Hohenstatt | Juneau Empire)
Sunrise over South Fairbanks came at 3:10 a.m. on a recent June morning. (Courtesy Photo | Ned Rozell)

Here’s what happens when a world traveler visits South Fairbanks

The sun rose with the color of an orange Creamsicle.

Sunrise over South Fairbanks came at 3:10 a.m. on a recent June morning. (Courtesy Photo | Ned Rozell)
Long-distance, seasonal migrations are part of the animal world

Long-distance, seasonal migrations are part of the animal world

Oh, the places they go.

Long-distance, seasonal migrations are part of the animal world
Permafrost specialist Tom Douglas pauses on the ice of a Fairbanks creek that shows recent bank erosion, probably due to the thawing of soil that had been frozen for many years. (Courtesy Photo | Ned Rozell)
Permafrost specialist Tom Douglas pauses on the ice of a Fairbanks creek that shows recent bank erosion, probably due to the thawing of soil that had been frozen for many years. (Courtesy Photo | Ned Rozell)
With age comes an appreciation for brakes

With age comes an appreciation for brakes

While I agree with the “send it” ethos, I don’t want to send myself into unconsciousness.

With age comes an appreciation for brakes
More than meets the (human) eye

More than meets the (human) eye

We can’t see all the ways flowers communicate with pollinators.

More than meets the (human) eye
Biologist Sophie Gilbert and glaciologist Tim Bartholomaus smile together in 2018. (Courtesy Photo | Tim Bartholomaus and Sophie Gilbert)

A tale of glacier mice and young love

The mice aren’t real, the relationship is.

Biologist Sophie Gilbert and glaciologist Tim Bartholomaus smile together in 2018. (Courtesy Photo | Tim Bartholomaus and Sophie Gilbert)
Wild flowers with Echo Ranch horses on the edge of Berners Bay. (Courtesy Photo | Kenneth Gill, gillfoto)

Wild Shots: Photos of Mother Nature in Alaska

Reader-submitted photos.

Wild flowers with Echo Ranch horses on the edge of Berners Bay. (Courtesy Photo | Kenneth Gill, gillfoto)
Planet walk puts things in perspective

Planet walk puts things in perspective

The greenhouse effect is crucial for life, but it’s possible to have too much of a good thing.

Planet walk puts things in perspective
Building an immune system capable of fighting disease is probably more important than being mentally, or physically capable of a mountain hunt in a few months. Ryan John scours the mountains near Ketchikan on an afternoon in September. (Courtesy Photo | Jeff Lund)

Thinking inside the box

Staying fit and not just for hiking in August.

Building an immune system capable of fighting disease is probably more important than being mentally, or physically capable of a mountain hunt in a few months. Ryan John scours the mountains near Ketchikan on an afternoon in September. (Courtesy Photo | Jeff Lund)
Bog plants and bird feeder begin to bustle

Bog plants and bird feeder begin to bustle

Right now, it’s busy outside.

Bog plants and bird feeder begin to bustle
A brown bear chomps on a sockeye salmon on the Alaska Peninsula. (Courtesy Photo | Drew Hamilton)

Pride of Bristol Bay: The bears of McNeil and the Pebble Mine project

They’re on a collision course.

A brown bear chomps on a sockeye salmon on the Alaska Peninsula. (Courtesy Photo | Drew Hamilton)