University of Alaska issues layoff notices to most HR employees

University of Alaska issues layoff notices to most HR employees

UA is reorganizing, downsizing its human resources department

FAIRBANKS — The University of Alaska has issued layoff notices to 48 employees as part of an overhaul of its human resources department.

UA President Jim Johnsen announced the changes, which will include downsizing, on Monday. He called the changes a redesign.

“This is not a merger — it is a complete redesign based on best practices in higher education, which will lead to increased efficiencies that ultimately serve you better,” Johnsen wrote in an email to employees. “We want to make our search for new talent more efficient and our onboarding of new employees more effective.”

[University of Alaska board votes no on education school accreditation]

Laid-off employees can apply for jobs in the reorganized department. Layoffs will take effect in September.

There are 51 HR positions in the university system, said UA spokeswoman Robbie Graham. Fourteen of the people given a layoff notice are at UA Fairbanks.

The university will see cost savings from downsizing the number of directors within human resources and accompanying efficiencies, Graham said. The impetus, however, is a desire to create efficiencies and provide better customer service, she said.

Funding is an ongoing concern for the university. State representatives and senators discussed the operating budget in a conference committee this week. Amid uncertainty, the UA Board of Regents planned a special budget meeting Thursday in Anchorage.

The university’s new human resources structure will change from a traditional office to five specific areas of focus: operations, talent acquisition, transition and benefits, labor and employee engagement, and organization development.

Some position descriptions, and the locations for people to fill them, remain unsettled, Graham said.

“Some will be place-based, but many positions will not be, meaning they can do their job from any location,” Graham said by email.


• This is an Associated Press report.


More in News

Jasmine Chavez, a crew member aboard the Quantum of the Seas cruise ship, waves to her family during a cell phone conversation after disembarking from the ship at Marine Park on May 10. (Mark Sabbatini / Juneau Empire file photo)
Ships in port for the week of May 18

Here’s what to expect this week.

(Michael Penn / Juneau Empire file photo)
Police calls for Friday, May 17, 2024

This report contains public information from law enforcement and public safety agencies.

(Michael Penn / Juneau Empire file photo)
Police calls for Thursday, May 16, 2024

This report contains public information from law enforcement and public safety agencies.

Students and staff play a kickball game on the field between the Marie Drake Building and Juneau-Douglas High School: Yadaa.at Kalé on Friday afternoon. (Mark Sabbatini / Juneau Empire)
School district leaders debate biggest needs for extra $5.2M approved by Legislature, in hope governor won’t veto it

Staff for special education and gifted students, homeschooling, paying off city loan high on list.

Rep. Andi Story, D-Juneau, speaks Wednesday, May 8, on the floor of the Alaska House of Representatives. (James Brooks/Alaska Beacon)
After several deadly drownings, Alaska Legislature votes to require harbor safety ladders

Bill by Rep. Andi Story, D-Juneau, passes on final day of session.

Members of the Thunder Mountain High School culinary arts team prepare their three-course meal during the National ProStart Invitational in Baltimore on April 26-28. (Photo by Rebecca Giedosh-Ruge)
TMHS culinary arts team serves a meal of kings at national competition

Five students who won state competition bring Alaskan crab and salmon to “Top Chef”-style event.

(Michael Penn / Juneau Empire file photo)
Police calls for Wednesday, May 15, 2024

This report contains public information from law enforcement and public safety agencies.

Sen. Lyman Hoffman, D-Bethel, listens to discussion on the Senate floor on Wednesday. (James Brooks/Alaska Beacon)
A look at some of the bills that failed to pass the Alaska Legislature this year

Parts of a long-term plan to bring state revenue and expenses into line again failed to advance.

Most Read