This photo shows the cover of the 2021 edition of “Tidal Echoes.” The annual collection of Southeast Alaskan art and writing is again accepting submissions. (Courtesy photo / Tidal Echoes)

This photo shows the cover of the 2021 edition of “Tidal Echoes.” The annual collection of Southeast Alaskan art and writing is again accepting submissions. (Courtesy photo / Tidal Echoes)

‘Tidal Echoes’ puts out the call for submissions

“Tidal Echoes” is accepting submissions now through Dec. 1.

By Shaelene Moler

For the Capital City Weekly

“Tidal Echoes,” the annual Southeast Alaskan literature and arts journal administered by the University of Alaska Southeast, is accepting submissions now through Dec. 1.

First published in 2004, “Tidal Echoes” welcomes submissions of all writing and art forms, including, but not limited to: fiction and non-fiction prose, poetry, paintings, drawings, photography, woodwork, ceramics, etc.. There are submission quantity limits on each category: five for art, five for poetry, and three for prose. The prose can be no longer than 10 double-spaced pages (or 5,000 words), and the artwork needs to be at least 1800 pixels wide.

Submissions are accepted online through the “Tidal Echoes” website using Submittable at: https://uas.alaska.edu/arts_sciences/humanities/english/tidal-echoes/submission-guidelines.html. On the Submittable website, the category submitters wish to submit must be selected, and from there submitters will be asked to fill out a form, provide their first and last names, physical address, phone number, email address, a short third-person biography and to sign the terms of agreement. If a UAS student submits, it is requested that they provide their student ID number to verify their enrollment. After this, submitters are asked to attach their submissions in Microsoft word format (.doc or .docx) for writing, or the digital format (.tif or .jpg) for artwork.

The “Tidal Echoes” staff is composed of UAS student interns, faculty, staff and sometimes community members under mentorship of UAS professor of English Emily Wall. Typically, there are three student interns who take part in this process — the senior editor, junior editor and fall editor. This year’s senior editor will be Emily Bowman, who is a junior at UAS from Juneau with ambitions to pursue a career in editing and publication, and she will direct the production of the 2022 edition. The fall and junior editor, Shaelene Moler, who is the first Indigenous person to serve in the position, will be mentored by Bowman during the spring semester.

The 2022 edition of Tidal Echoes is set to feature writer Kersten Christianson, who has been published in Tidal Echoes several times before, and artist Kaasteen Jill Meserve. Christianson is a high school English teacher and poet who serves as poetry editor of “Alaska Women Speak.” Meserve is a Tlingit beader whose work has recently been featured in the Hulu show “Reservation Dogs.”

For more information, or to ask questions regarding Tidal Echoes, you can visit the Tidal Echoes website at: https://uas.alaska.edu/arts_sciences/humanities/english/tidal-echoes/index.html or email them at uas.tidalechoes@alaska.edu. People can also keep up with Tidal Echoes on their Facebook (@TidalEchoes) or Instagram (@uas.tidalechoes). For questions about the artwork section, people can contact associate professor of art Jeremy Kane at jmkane@alaska.edu.

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