Sealaska Heritage Institute’s Walter Soboleff Building was recently awarded a Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design Gold rating by the United States Green Building Council. (Courtesy Photo | Sealaska Heritage Institute)

Sealaska Heritage Institute’s Walter Soboleff Building was recently awarded a Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design Gold rating by the United States Green Building Council. (Courtesy Photo | Sealaska Heritage Institute)

Soboleff building gets gold for being green, music program receives a grant, CCS is on the move

News briefs for the week of Aug. 1, 2019.

Tuition-free music program receives a national grant

Juneau Alaska Music Matters, a tuition-free music program, is among the recipients of a PlayUSA grant, according to a press release from Carnegie.

Meghan Johnson, JAMM’s interim executive director, said when reached by phone JAMM will receive $10,000.

That money will primarily be used to help make music equitable for secondary school students, Johnson said.

“JAMM has been a K-5 program, but our first group of students is entering ninth grade, and we’re looking at how we can continue to support those students,” Johnson said. “The funding will be used to help programs that support all secondary students.”

JAMM was one of 17 total organizations and one of five new partners selected to receive PlayUSA grant support this year, according to Cargegie Hall’s press release.

Walter Soboleff Building’s gets recognition for sustainable design

Sealaska Heritage Institute’s Walter Soboleff Building was awarded a Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design Gold rating by the United States Green Building Council.

LEED is the most widely used system for rating projects’ environmental impact, and LEED Gold is the second highest level of performance that can be achieved under the program.

SHI is a nonprofit that protects and promotes Alaska Native arts and culture.

SHI set LEED Gold as a requirement for the design of its building, which opened in 2015, to comport with core cultural values that honor past, present and future generations, said SHI President Rosita Worl in a press release.

“Although we realized that meeting the gold standard would mean higher initial construction costs, we had no other alternative but to ensure that we complied with our core cultural values, such as Haa Shuká, which translates as honoring our ancestors and future generations,” Worl said in a release. “Buildings have an enormous impact on the well being of people and the planet, and we’re proud to say we’ve achieved one of the greenest LEED levels in the world.”

The design team was led by MRV Architects and included PDC Engineers for mechanical and civil design, Haight and Associates (with PDC) for electrical design, BBFM Engineers, Inc., for structural design and Alaska Energy Engineering, LLC, for energy modeling. The structure was built by Dawson Construction, with SHI’s Chief Operating Officer Lee Kadinger representing SHI throughout design and construction phases.

“This project was an exceptional opportunity to showcase Native cultural materials and form, as well as best design practices,” said MRV President Paul Voelckers in a release. “The team worked together to create a building that honors its setting and history.”

Catholic Community Service, Inc. changes locations

Catholic Community Service has moved.

Its headquarters, finance, administration and Hospice and Home Care of Juneau are now at 1803 Glacier Highway. That neighbors the Bridge Adult Day Center.

The Senior and Caregiver Resource Center is still located in the St. Ann’s building at 419 Fifth St.

For more information, visit ccsjuneau.org or call the main office at 463-6100.

In this November 2013 photo, kindergartners give looks of anticipation before their first Kindergarten Paper Violin Concert at Glacier Valley Elementery School Wednesday. The concert showcased the efforts of Juneau, Alaska Music Matters, which recently was awarded a $10,000 grant. (Michael Penn | Juneau Empire File)

In this November 2013 photo, kindergartners give looks of anticipation before their first Kindergarten Paper Violin Concert at Glacier Valley Elementery School Wednesday. The concert showcased the efforts of Juneau, Alaska Music Matters, which recently was awarded a $10,000 grant. (Michael Penn | Juneau Empire File)

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