“Raven Makes the Aleutians” is one of the three newest books in the Sealaska Heritage Institute-sponsored Baby Raven Reads program. It is an adaptations of an oral story and was illustrated by Tlingit artist Janine Gibbons. (Courtesy photo | Sealaska Heritage Institute)

“Raven Makes the Aleutians” is one of the three newest books in the Sealaska Heritage Institute-sponsored Baby Raven Reads program. It is an adaptations of an oral story and was illustrated by Tlingit artist Janine Gibbons. (Courtesy photo | Sealaska Heritage Institute)

SHI announces new books; library shares bookmark winners

CCW news briefs for the week of Nov. 28, 2018.

SHI unveils new Baby Raven Reads books at Public Market

Sealaska Heritage Institute released three new culturally-based children’s books through its award-winning Baby Raven Reads program.

The books, “Raven and the Tide Lady,” “Raven Loses His Nose” and “Raven Makes the Aleutians” are based on ancient Northwest Coast Raven stories but are adapted for children.

“The original Raven stories are complex, humorous and sometimes filled with raucous adventures,” said SHI President Rosita Worl in a press release. “Raven stories are not about what is viewed as proper behavior, but what is not acceptable behavior. Raven the Trickster is found in oral traditions throughout North America and elsewhere in the world and teaches people how to exist in society.”

The books were adapted from the works of the late Nora and Dick Dauenhauer, who transcribed the stories from elders’ oral accounts.

Baby Raven Reads, is an award-winning program sponsored by SHI that promotes early-literacy, language development and school readiness for Alaska Native families with children up to age 5. The pilot program in Juneau ended in 2017, and SHI received funding to offer the program for another three years and to expand it to nine other communities in Southeast Alaska.

Public libraries share bookmark contest winners

The Juneau Public Library announced winners of its annual bookmark contest.

Friends of Juneau Public Library and Hearthside Books ensured all winners and honorable mentions received gift certificates.

Award winners were pre-schoolers Alora Bennett, Zephaniah Mason and Evelyn Whistler; kindergarteners Xenali Disney, Nia Paw and Boone Ritter; first-graders Joya McClain, Mason Bran and Ezekiel Kilmer; second-graders Kiana Twitchell, Zara Ginn and Jackson Mattingly; third-graders Adalyn Hartman; Aurelia Field and Amy Liddle; fourth-graders Logan Carriker, Miley Andrews, Dan Degener and Hunter Schall; fifth-graders Leina Tillotson, Kate Stickel, and Laura Bohulano; sixth-graders Eloise Taboada, Harmony Siverly, and Violet Ricker; seventh-graders Elizabeth Djajalie, Katelyn Kohuth, Claire Durling and Kylie Kato; eighth-grader Micah Brown; high school students Virginia Potts and Nancy Liddle.

Juneau Public Library bookmark contest winners pose as a group. (Courtesy photo | Juneau Public Library)

Juneau Public Library bookmark contest winners pose as a group. (Courtesy photo | Juneau Public Library)

A bookmark designed by Katelyn Kohuth was one of the winners in the annual Juneau Public Library bookmark contest. (Courtesy photo | Juneau Public Library)

A bookmark designed by Katelyn Kohuth was one of the winners in the annual Juneau Public Library bookmark contest. (Courtesy photo | Juneau Public Library)

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