“Raven Makes the Aleutians” is one of the three newest books in the Sealaska Heritage Institute-sponsored Baby Raven Reads program. It is an adaptations of an oral story and was illustrated by Tlingit artist Janine Gibbons. (Courtesy photo | Sealaska Heritage Institute)

“Raven Makes the Aleutians” is one of the three newest books in the Sealaska Heritage Institute-sponsored Baby Raven Reads program. It is an adaptations of an oral story and was illustrated by Tlingit artist Janine Gibbons. (Courtesy photo | Sealaska Heritage Institute)

SHI announces new books; library shares bookmark winners

CCW news briefs for the week of Nov. 28, 2018.

SHI unveils new Baby Raven Reads books at Public Market

Sealaska Heritage Institute released three new culturally-based children’s books through its award-winning Baby Raven Reads program.

The books, “Raven and the Tide Lady,” “Raven Loses His Nose” and “Raven Makes the Aleutians” are based on ancient Northwest Coast Raven stories but are adapted for children.

“The original Raven stories are complex, humorous and sometimes filled with raucous adventures,” said SHI President Rosita Worl in a press release. “Raven stories are not about what is viewed as proper behavior, but what is not acceptable behavior. Raven the Trickster is found in oral traditions throughout North America and elsewhere in the world and teaches people how to exist in society.”

The books were adapted from the works of the late Nora and Dick Dauenhauer, who transcribed the stories from elders’ oral accounts.

Baby Raven Reads, is an award-winning program sponsored by SHI that promotes early-literacy, language development and school readiness for Alaska Native families with children up to age 5. The pilot program in Juneau ended in 2017, and SHI received funding to offer the program for another three years and to expand it to nine other communities in Southeast Alaska.

Public libraries share bookmark contest winners

The Juneau Public Library announced winners of its annual bookmark contest.

Friends of Juneau Public Library and Hearthside Books ensured all winners and honorable mentions received gift certificates.

Award winners were pre-schoolers Alora Bennett, Zephaniah Mason and Evelyn Whistler; kindergarteners Xenali Disney, Nia Paw and Boone Ritter; first-graders Joya McClain, Mason Bran and Ezekiel Kilmer; second-graders Kiana Twitchell, Zara Ginn and Jackson Mattingly; third-graders Adalyn Hartman; Aurelia Field and Amy Liddle; fourth-graders Logan Carriker, Miley Andrews, Dan Degener and Hunter Schall; fifth-graders Leina Tillotson, Kate Stickel, and Laura Bohulano; sixth-graders Eloise Taboada, Harmony Siverly, and Violet Ricker; seventh-graders Elizabeth Djajalie, Katelyn Kohuth, Claire Durling and Kylie Kato; eighth-grader Micah Brown; high school students Virginia Potts and Nancy Liddle.

Juneau Public Library bookmark contest winners pose as a group. (Courtesy photo | Juneau Public Library)

Juneau Public Library bookmark contest winners pose as a group. (Courtesy photo | Juneau Public Library)

A bookmark designed by Katelyn Kohuth was one of the winners in the annual Juneau Public Library bookmark contest. (Courtesy photo | Juneau Public Library)

A bookmark designed by Katelyn Kohuth was one of the winners in the annual Juneau Public Library bookmark contest. (Courtesy photo | Juneau Public Library)

More in News

This photo shows the National Archives in the Sand Point neighborhood of Seattle that has about a million boxes of generally unique, original source documents and public records. In an announcement made Thursday, April 8, 2021, the Biden administration has halted the sale of the federal archives building in Seattle, following months of opposition from people across the Pacific Northwest and a lawsuit by the Washington Attorney General's Office. Among the records at the center are tribal, military, land, court, tax and census documents. (Alan Berner / The Seattle Times)
Biden halts sale of National Archives center in Seattle

Tribes and members of Congress pushed for the halt.

This photo shows Unangax̂ Gravesite at Funter Bay, the site where Aleut villagers forcibly relocated to the area during World War II are buried. A bill recently passed by the Alaska House of Representatives would make the area part of a neighboring state park. (Courtesy photo / Niko Sanguinetti, Juneau-Douglas City Museum) 
DO NOT REUSE THIS PHOTO WITHOUT PERMISSION FROM JUNEAU DOUGLAS CITY MUSEUM. -BEN HOHENSTATT
Bill to preserve Unangax̂ Gravesite passes House

Bill now heads to the state Senate.

After over 30 years at 3100 Channel Drive, the Juneau Empire offices are on the move. (Ben Hohenstatt /Juneau Empire File)
The Juneau Empire is on the move

Advertising and editorial staff are moving to Jordan Creek Center.

The state announced this week that studded tires will be allowed for longer than usual. In Southeast Alaska, studded tires will be allowed until May 1 instead of April 15. (Dana Zigmund / Juneau Empire)
State extends studded tire deadline

Prolonged wintry weather triggers the change.

COVID at a glance for Friay, April 9

The most recent state and local numbers.

Gavel (Courtesy photo)
Court sides with Dunleavy in appointments dispute

The court, in a brief order, reversed a ruling by a superior court judge.

The Juneau Police Department are seeking Brenda Jay Gallant, 40, after she was indicted recently for her alleged role in a 2021 vehicle arson. (Courtesy photo / JPD)
Police seeking woman indicted for arson

The indictment for the August fire came this March.

Police calls for Friday, April 9, 2021

This report contains public information from law enforcement and public safety agencies.

Most Read