In this July 2007, photo, workers with the Pebble Mine project test drill in the Bristol Bay region of Alaska, near the village of Iliamma. The Pebble Limited Partnership, which wants to build a copper and gold mine near the headwaters of a major U.S. salmon fishery in southwest Alaska, says it plans to offer residents in the region a dividend. (AP Photo | Al Grillo, File)

In this July 2007, photo, workers with the Pebble Mine project test drill in the Bristol Bay region of Alaska, near the village of Iliamma. The Pebble Limited Partnership, which wants to build a copper and gold mine near the headwaters of a major U.S. salmon fishery in southwest Alaska, says it plans to offer residents in the region a dividend. (AP Photo | Al Grillo, File)

Release of Pebble Mine review expected this week

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers plans to release its final environmental review.

  • By BECKY BOHRER Associated Press
  • Monday, July 20, 2020 3:49pm
  • NewsPebble Mine

By BECKY BOHRER

Associated Press

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers plans to release its final environmental review of a proposed copper and gold mine near the headwaters of a major salmon fishery in southwest Alaska, a review a corps official says will inform a permit decision expected later this year.

For years, the proposed Pebble Mine has been shrouded in controversy that release of the review expected Friday is unlikely to clear up. Some tribes, tribal groups, fishermen and others say the review has been rushed and is superficial.

Tom Collier, CEO of the Pebble Limited Partnership, the project developer, said the work done so far provides confidence the review will show “why we believe the project can be done without harm to the Bristol Bay fishery.”

The corps previously disclosed a preliminary determination that a northern transportation route would be part of a “least environmentally damaging practicable alternative.” David Hobbie, chief of the corps’ regional regulatory division, told reporters Monday that public comment, work with other agencies and review of information and impacts went into that determination.

Pedro Bay Corp., an Alaska Native village corporation, and the Igiugig Village Council, through officials, have raised concerns with that option, citing their ownership of land in the area that they have not given Pebble permission to use. Hobbie said the corps still deemed the option practicable because Pebble did.

Mike Heatwole, a Pebble spokesperson, by email said the Pebble partnership plans to engage with all landowners along the northern route and believes it “will be successful in obtaining access to the transportation corridor necessary for the project.”

Hobbie said the review would disclose the types of impacts that could be expected with a project.

The corps has said there are three options with its later record of decision: issuance of a permit; issuance of a permit with conditions; or denial. Hobbie said a record of decision cannot be finalized for at least 30 days from the publishing of the final environmental review.

Bristol Bay produces about half the world’s sockeye salmon, according to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, which under the Obama administration proposed restrictions on development in the region. Those restrictions were never finalized, and the agency last year withdrew the proposal, saying it was outdated and issued preemptively.

Pebble argued the proposed restrictions were based on hypothetical projects and pushed to have the project go through the permitting process. Canada-based Northern Dynasty Minerals Ltd., which owns the Pebble partnership, has been seeking a project partner for years, and Pebble is hopeful that success with permitting will aid in that effort. Pebble, as part of its push, still would need state approvals.

Critics say the Bristol Bay region is no place for a mine like this and have vowed to continue fighting Pebble.

• This is an Associated Press report.

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