Anastasia Hobson-George, right, works with weaver Lily Hope as the Artist-in-Residence at the Walter Soboleff Center in May 2019. Hobson-George is one of the youngest-ever winners of a Rasmuson Foundation Individual Artist Award. Applications for the awards are now open. (Michael Penn | Juneau Empire File)

Anastasia Hobson-George, right, works with weaver Lily Hope as the Artist-in-Residence at the Walter Soboleff Center in May 2019. Hobson-George is one of the youngest-ever winners of a Rasmuson Foundation Individual Artist Award. Applications for the awards are now open. (Michael Penn | Juneau Empire File)

Rasmuson Foundation accepts artist award applications, the city museum receives an art donation and more

News briefs for the week of Dec. 19, 2019.

It’s time to apply for Rasmuson Foundation Individual Artist Awards

The Rasmuson Foundation is accepting applications for 2020 Individual Artist Awards. Applications will be accepted through March 2. In addition to individual artists, groups and collaboratives — two or more artists working together — for the first time will be eligible for Project Awards and Fellowships. A musical band, a dance company and a multimedia collective are some examples.

Artists can apply for either a project award or a fellowship. Applications can be submitted online through rasmuson.org.

Project awards come with a $7,500 prize for a specific, short-term project that clearly benefits the artist’s growth. Artists at all career stages — emerging, mid-career and mature — are eligible to apply for an award in 11 recognized disciplines.

Fellowship awards come with a $18,000 prize for mid-career and mature artists to focus their energy and attention on a yearlong period of creative exploration. In 2020, Fellowship categories are: media arts, multidiscipline, music composition, new genre, presentation/interpretation and visual arts.

To help artists with the application process, the foundation is offering workshops in Anchorage and other communities as well as online. The first one is set for Tuesday, Jan. 7, 5:30- 8 p.m. at the Anchorage Museum. Other dates and locations will be announced online on Facebook and at rasmuson.org.

Additional resources, including a recorded webinar and tips on how to write an artist statement, are available by scrolling down at this link.

Artists with questions can email staff at arts@rasmuson.org or call 297.2700.

Juneau-Douglas City Museum Receives Rie Munoz Original Artwork

The Munoz Family last Thursday donated a collection of Rie Munoz original artwork to the Juneau-Douglas City Museum. The donation included five original watercolor paintings, 55 original pen-and-ink political cartoons that were published by the Alaska Sunday Press — now the Juneau Empire — in the 1950s and 1960s. Also included from the same era are hundreds of newspaper clippings of cartoons.

This cartoon is part of a collection of Rie Munoz artwork recently donated to the Juneau-Douglas City Museum. (Courtesy Photo | Juneau-Douglas City Museum)

This cartoon is part of a collection of Rie Munoz artwork recently donated to the Juneau-Douglas City Museum. (Courtesy Photo | Juneau-Douglas City Museum)

Munoz came to Alaska in 1950 for a short visit on board the steamship Princess Louise.

The 55 political cartoons donated to the City Museum poke gentle fun at past local and state politicians and are a glimpse into Juneau’s history.

“The cartoons debated topics such as commercial fishing and capital moves, similar issues faced today,” said Juan Munoz in a release.

Innovation Summit registration is open

Registration is now open for Juneau Economic Development Council’s 2020 Innovation Summit.

Early registration rates will be available through Jan. 15. Registration for the day-and-a-half summit will cost $275 during that time. Registration can be done through jedc.org.

This year’s summit will explore “Participatory Creativity,” “Business in a Changing Climate” and “Alaskans Investing in Alaskans,” according to JEDC.

The summit will take place Feb. 26 and 27 at Centennial Hall.

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