Overall Alaska crime down, but violent crime is at 5 year high

Overall Alaska crime down, but violent crime is at 5 year high

Juneau had more than 1,800 arrests reported

Crime overall is down in Alaska, but violent crimes increased last year, according to new statewide data released on Monday.

The Alaska Department of Public Safety released its report on crime in Alaska for 2018, compiled with data submitted by Alaska police departments.

In broad terms, the report shows that total offenses in Alaska are down by 5 percent since 2017. However, violent crimes — including aggravated assault, rape, and murder — are up by 3 percent. The most common violent crime is aggravated assault, with 4,377 cases reported. Rape is the next most prevalent, with 1,188 cases reported. There were also 47 counts of murder. Violent crimes make up 21 percent of all crimes reported last year.

Violent crimes are at their highest point in five years, the report shows.

Murder, robbery, and assault are all trending up since 2000, while burglary and larceny are trending down, according to the report. Vehicle theft has stayed largely stable. Alaska has exceeded the national average and stayed there in every single one of these crimes in the last five years.

The data also paints a picture of crime and number of arrests in Alaska’s capital city.

In Juneau, there were no arrests for murder in 2018. There were arrests for two rapes, 82 aggravated assault and 265 other assaults, 46 arrests for drug possession, 190 DUIs and 40 disorderly conduct arrests. A total of $1,827,819 of property was reported stolen from people and property in the capital city.

Of those arrests in Juneau, 1,325 arrests were made on men and 543 were made on women. The largest demographic group made arrests on were white males, aged 25-29, with 258 arrested out of 1868 total arrests.


• Contact reporter Michael S. Lockett at 523-2271 or mlockett@juneauempire.com.


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