Recipients of the 2019 Hope Endowment grants from the Juneau Community Foundation pose for a photo at Marine Park in Juneau. (Courtesy Photo | Juneau Community Foundation)

Recipients of the 2019 Hope Endowment grants from the Juneau Community Foundation pose for a photo at Marine Park in Juneau. (Courtesy Photo | Juneau Community Foundation)

Organizations helping Juneau’s vulnerable population are getting a boost

Juneau Community Foundation, city giving out $1.8 million

The Juneau Community Foundation and the city awarded more than two dozen grants totaling over $1.8 million to local nonprofits in an effort to aid Juneau’s most vulnerable residents, the foundation announced last week.

The grants are primarily going to organizations that focus on homelessness, food security, substance use disorders, domestic violence, suicide prevention, senior care and other social services. The grantees were chosen based on input from local nonprofits, community members and the JCF’s Professional Advisory Committee.

Kate Burkhart, a member of the committee, listed some of the committee’s top priorities.

“For five years, the Foundation has worked closely with community leaders and social services providers to identify gaps and prioritize the greatest needs,” Burkhart said in a release, “including supporting additional residential substance use disorder treatment, expanding navigation services for people who experience or are at-risk of homelessness, ensuring a universal breakfast program in all elementary schools, and increasing access to civil legal assistance.”

[New housing summit looks at housing problems, solutions in Southeast]

The Juneau Hope Endowment Fund was established in 2014 and is managed by the JCF to provide social service grants every year. This is the fourth year that the foundation has provided a combined grant process that includes City and Borough of Juneau Social Service Grants.

Twenty-six grants are going to 25 organizations, drawing money from the JCF’s Hope Endowment Fund ($1.05 million) and the CBJ’s Social Service Funds ($776,400). The Juneau Coalition on Housing and Homelessness is getting $285,000, and will be distributing it to various homeless services in town including Housing First and St. Vincent de Paul’s Navigator Program.

Gastineau Human Services is getting the most money, in two parts. GHS is getting $278,740 for substance use disorder programs, and through the Juneau Coalition on Housing and Homelessness it’s getting $100,000 for its Flexible Funding Housing Program.

[Dunleavy’s request could lead to money for health, homeless organizations]

The CBJ Utility Waiver Program is giving nearly $50,000 in utility waivers to nonprofits that house people as part of their mission, and the Avista Corporation gave $10,000 to the Hope Endowment Fund.

The CBJ Utility Waiver support will go to nine nonprofits, including $10,000 each for St. Vincent de Paul and Wildflower Court.

“Through a lot of hard work and dedication, Juneau’s social service organizations provide a web of support for so many of our friends, family and neighbors,” Mayor Beth Weldon said in the release. “The foundation’s grant process helps to make the web even stronger.”

The full list of recipients is included in the release embedded below.




• Contact reporter Alex McCarthy at amccarthy@juneauempire.com. Follow him on Twitter at @akmccarthy.


More in News

A Princess Cruise Line ship is docked in Juneau on Aug. 25, 2021. (Michael Lockett / Juneau Empire File)
Ships in Port for the week of Aug. 14

Here’s what to expect this week.

Supporters of U.S. Sen. Lisa Murkowski wait for an opportunity to talk to her at her newly Juneau campaign headquarters Thursday evening at Kootznoowoo Plaza. (Mark Sabbatini / Juneau Empire)
Murkowski opens up at Juneau HQ debut

Senator chats with supporters about U.S. vs. Belgium voting, moose chili and Project Veritas

(Juneau Empire File / Michael Penn)
Police calls for Saturday, Aug. 13, 2022

This report contains public information from law enforcement and public safety agencies.

U.S. Senate candidate Shoshana Gungurstein stars in a campaign sign within view of the Alaska governor’s mansion. Gungurstein, an independent, got exposure this week for being a Hollywood actress under a different last name after questions about her past went unanswered throughout the campaign. She is one of 19 candidates seeking to be among the four selected in next Tuesday’s primary to compete in the November general election. (Mark Sabbatini / Juneau Empire)
Senate candidate sheds more light on background

Shoshana Gungurstein responds at length to recent report on past film career.

(Michael Penn / Juneau Empire File)
Drug arrest made in Skagway

Police say a suspicious package was intercepted.

This late-April photo shows a damaged sticker on a door at Thunder Mountain High School reminding people to social distance and wear masks inside the building. Masks will not be required in school buildings this year. (Ben Hohenstatt / Juneau Empire File)
No mandatory masks or COVID-19 tests for new school year

No mandatory masks or COVID-19 tests for new school year

(Juneau Empire File / Michael Penn)
Police calls for Friday Aug. 12, 2022

This report contains public information from law enforcement and public safety agencies.

From left, Kelsey Dean, watershed scientist with the Southeast Alaska Watershed Coalition, and Kaagwaan Eesh Manuel Rose-Bell of Keex’ Kwáan watch as crew members set up tools to drag a log into place. Healthy salmon habitat requires woody debris, typically provided by falling branches and trees, which helps create deep salmon pools and varied stream structure. (Courtesy Photos / Mary Catharine Martin)
 
The SalmonState: Bringing the sockeye home

Klawock Indigenous Stewards and partners are working to a once prolific sockeye salmon run.

(Juneau Empire File / Michael Penn)
Police calls for Thursday, Aug. 11, 2022

This report contains public information from law enforcement and public safety agencies.

Most Read