Jim Anderson talks with Thunder Mountain High School music chair Brian Van Kirk. Anderson donated a guitar and several other music accessories during the first ever musical instrument drive at the high school. The drive is a way to help provide instruments throughout the school district for students interested in music. (Ben Hohenstatt | Capital City Weekly)

Jim Anderson talks with Thunder Mountain High School music chair Brian Van Kirk. Anderson donated a guitar and several other music accessories during the first ever musical instrument drive at the high school. The drive is a way to help provide instruments throughout the school district for students interested in music. (Ben Hohenstatt | Capital City Weekly)

Music drive is instrumental for high school program

TMHS band chair Van Kirk conducts secondhand instrument roundup

They took the retired, the worn and the muddled saxes.

Brian Van Kirk, music chair at Thunder Mountain High School, and a handful of band students collected secondhand horns, woodwinds and more for a musical instrument drive Saturday at the high school.

“I’m not sure what to expect,” Van Kirk said. “This is the first time we’ve done this.”

Van Kirk said the drive is a way to supplement the instruments available for students in the district, and there is a need because of a lack of local instrument rental options.

Also, he said it’s a way to ensure interest in music being cultivated at the elementary school level can continue to grow.

“We need to make sure it’s sustainable at the middle school and high school levels,” Van Kirk said.

The drive started at 9 a.m., and 90 minutes later, about a dozen musical instruments had been donated. Donors were given tax deductible donation sheets for their instruments.

At 10:30 a.m. the haul included a drum set, a flute, a drum kit, a clarinet, multiple saxophones, a nearly brand new violin and an unopened guitar among other items.

Becca Marx was one of the donors.

Marx dropped off a violin she was given in sixth grade and played sparingly.

“I’ve only played it a couple of times,” Marx said. “I thought it’d go to better use here.”

Jim Anderson, who donated a Fender acoustic guitar still in its original box, had similar thoughts.

“My wife was into playing the guitar, and it just went away for her,” Anderson said. “It’s nice to have it out of the house and taking up space and have it someplace people will use it. Maybe the next Eric Clapton will play it.”

Anderson also donated a guitar tuner, a pitch pipe and a homemade music stand that could be converted to be used on a table or as a standalone.

“I think it was like a tie rack, and I started looking at it, and I said, ‘I can do this,” Anderson said of the custom-built equipment.

Van Kirk said all of the items could be used, and the instruments collected will be used throughout the district.

“I need bigger instruments, but violins and guitars are really needed,” Van Kirk said.

Even the instruments in states of slight disrepair can be fixed and used.

“We’re looking at having some different organizations help with some repairs, which we hope to do locally,” Van Kirk said.

While the drive ended at noon Saturday, Van Kirk said collection efforts can continue if there are people in the community with instruments they’d like to donate.

“They can come by and drop it off at Thunder Mountain,” Van Kirk said.


• Contact Capital City Weekly reporter Ben Hohenstatt at 523-2243.


Carol Stauffer fills out paperwork while Brian Van Kirk, Thunder Mountain High School music chair, inspects a trumpet donated by Stauffer, who also donated a clarinet. Stauffer’s daughters played the instruments in high school, when they were Van Kirk’s students. (Ben Hohenstatt | Capital City Weekly)

Carol Stauffer fills out paperwork while Brian Van Kirk, Thunder Mountain High School music chair, inspects a trumpet donated by Stauffer, who also donated a clarinet. Stauffer’s daughters played the instruments in high school, when they were Van Kirk’s students. (Ben Hohenstatt | Capital City Weekly)

More in News

A sign on a city bus urges the use of face coverings, but following an ordinance passed by the City and Borough of Juneau Assembly, all passengers will now be required to wear masks on buses and while using other city facilities. Friday, May 29, 2020. (Peter Segall | Juneau Empire)
Face coverings now required on buses, in city facilities

Masks will be provided for those who cannot afford them.

Juneau City Hall on Monday, March 30, 2020. (Peter Segall | Juneau Empire)
Finance committee votes to hold line on property tax

“Projects will still go on. Services will still go on.”

Police calls for Friday, May 29, 2020

This report contains public information available to the Empire from law enforcement… Continue reading

Police calls for Thursday, May 28, 2020

This report contains public information available to the Empire from law enforcement… Continue reading

Police calls for Wednesday, May 27, 2020

This report contains public information available to the Empire from law enforcement… Continue reading

Michael S. Lockett | Juneau Empire 
                                Henry Williams runs from Douglas to the Mendenhall Valley on Memorial Day to honor dead service members, including his relative, Air Force Tech Sgt. Leslie Dominic Williams, who died in Afghanistan in 2011.
Memorial Day passes quietly amid coronavirus concerns, damp weather

People found their own ways to honor the hallowed dead.

Archie (center), Ella (left) and Arrow (right) enjoy the dog-friendly Field 2 in Melvin Park on April 26, 2020. The field, Dimond Park, and the grassy area on top of Gold Street are all closed to dogs indefinitely due to a rising amount of unremoved dog poop. (Ben Hohenstatt | Juneau Empire)
Poop piles pose problem for parks

Three areas are closed, and more may follow if behavior does not improve.

Most Read