His and her-lesque: Nude & Rude Revue perform in Juneau

His and her-lesque: Nude & Rude Revue perform in Juneau

Traveling troupe in town for three nights

Feather boas and David Bowie came together Thursday,

The Nude & Rude Revue, a Skagway-based burlesque troupe, brought glitzy routines and glam rock covers to the Red Dog Saloon. They’re in town for a three-night stand during a West Coast tour.

“The best part is seeing it all come together, especially with all the Juneau performers and Skagway performers and any guest performers on any given night,” said performer Kelsey Riker.

Riker, a musical theater actor from New York City, started performing performing burlesque a couple of summers ago while doing seasonal work in Skagway and is a living example of why the troupe’s traveling show is titled “Try It; You’ll Like It.”

“I stumbled into burlesque,” Riker said. “It was another way to get on stage. I said, ‘Oh, it’s just in Alaska, it’ll be fine. Then I went back to New York and was performing burlesque. I tried it and liked it. Definitely.”

Co-producers and locals Cameron Brockett and Taylor Vidic said there were a ton of people, sponsors and collaborators who helped make the show a reality.

“You’re reminded every time you do something like this how many wonderful people are out there,” Vidic said.

A variety show

Every performance brought a different energy to the stage.

Some were silly and campy, others aimed for serious and smoldering, and a couple were totally off the wall, but while battling head colds, obtrusive moose heads and a technical hiccup, every performer brought it.

The show also included a few straightforward musical numbers and a show-stealing magic show.

Performances of all kinds were mostly backed by the Better Than Boobs Band, who charged through brassy covers of classics such as “I Put a Spell On You,” “Green Onions,” and a medley of Bowie covers that included the relative deep cut “I’m Afraid of Americans.”

But plenty of hollering from the audience kept it far from silent.

Attendees were overwhelmingly supportive, and every man and woman who got on stage walked off to loud clapping and cheers and a flurry of stage-bound dollar bills.

Based on polls by applause, the crowd was evenly split between men, women, first-timers and old hands.

Smiles and laughter were the common thread.

Teresa Bruce, who said her daughter knows troupe members Vidic and Brockett, was the first in line for the show.

Bruce was ready and waiting at least 20 minutes before the doors opened.

“I didn’t have tickets, and I was worried they’d be sold out,” Bruce said. “I’ve seen them before, and they’re wonderful. I might even come again tomorrow night.”

Riker said she’d recommend doing exactly that since each night offers unique surprises.

“I won’t say exactly, but burlesque is all about the tease, and just when you think you know what you’re getting, it’s something else,” Riker said.

Know & Go

What:Nude & Rude Revue: “Try It; You’ll Like It”

Where: The Red Dog Saloon

When: Friday, Sept. 28 and Saturday, Sept. 29

Admission: $25 for general admission and $40 for VIP


• Contact arts and culture reporter Ben Hohenstatt at 523-2243 or bhohenstatt@juneauempire.com. Follow him on Twitter at @capweekly.


Cameron Brockett and Taylor Vidic, co-producers and performers for burlesque troupe Nude & Rude Revue, address the hometown audience at the Red Dog Saloon shortly before intermission Thursday night. Brockett and Vidic are in town with a Skagway-based burlesque troupe that is touring Southeast Alaska, the Yukon Territory and ending in Seattle. (Ben Hohenstatt | Capital City Weekly)

Cameron Brockett and Taylor Vidic, co-producers and performers for burlesque troupe Nude & Rude Revue, address the hometown audience at the Red Dog Saloon shortly before intermission Thursday night. Brockett and Vidic are in town with a Skagway-based burlesque troupe that is touring Southeast Alaska, the Yukon Territory and ending in Seattle. (Ben Hohenstatt | Capital City Weekly)

Anya Absten mimes pulling a rope during Nude & Rude Revue burlesque troupe’s Thursday night show. (Ben Hohenstatt | Capital City Weekly)

Anya Absten mimes pulling a rope during Nude & Rude Revue burlesque troupe’s Thursday night show. (Ben Hohenstatt | Capital City Weekly)

Men took the stage too for the Nude & Rude Revue “Try It; You’ll Like it” burlesque show. This performance which revealed real men wear corsets and pasties, was set to “What’s Up” by 4 Non Blondes (Ben Hohenstatt | Capital City Weekly)

Men took the stage too for the Nude & Rude Revue “Try It; You’ll Like it” burlesque show. This performance which revealed real men wear corsets and pasties, was set to “What’s Up” by 4 Non Blondes (Ben Hohenstatt | Capital City Weekly)

Kelsey Riker, performer for the Nude & Rude Revue burlesque troupe, began her performance with a just-off-the-bus look before shedding the backpack and more during a tap routine. (Ben Hohenstatt | Capital City Weekly)

Kelsey Riker, performer for the Nude & Rude Revue burlesque troupe, began her performance with a just-off-the-bus look before shedding the backpack and more during a tap routine. (Ben Hohenstatt | Capital City Weekly)

More in News

Meals slated for children in Juneau over Thanksgiving weekend are arrayed on tables at Thunder Mountain High School on Nov. 25, 2020. (Courtesy photo / Luke Adams)
Font of plenty: JSD readies meals for Thanksgiving holiday

Nearly three tons of food got distributed for the long weekend.

Travelers arrive at the Juneau International Airport on Wednesday, Nov. 25, 2020, made up only about half of what the airport normally sees in the days leading up to the Thanksgiving holiday. (Peter Segall / Juneau Empire)
Centennial Hall, seen here on Tuesday, Nov. 24, is being used by the City and Borough of Juneau as an emergency facility during the coronavirus pandemic and will not host the annual Public Market which has taken place every weekend after Thanksgiving since 1983. (Peter Segall / Juneau Empire)
Want to buy Alaskan? Closed by pandemic, Public Market goes virtual

Normally throngs of Juneauites would be lined up around the block…

To capture the unexpected action- the unrepeatable moment- it should be instinctive.  In order to build the story you have to shoot the adjective.  In this photo the bald eagle had waited patiently for the right moment to pounce on an unsuspecting vole… the unexpected.  The best way to accomplish this is to master the art of the most difficult subject to photograph– birds in flight.  In order to do this you must learn your gear; it must become part of your muscle memory so you can concentrate on the story you are witnessing.  Canon 5D Mark III, Tamron 150-600mm, shot at 600mm, ISO AUTO (1250), F6.3, 1/3200, Handheld. (Courtesy Photo / Heather Holt)
Focal Point: Great photos are just waiting in the wings

Learn to shoot the verb (and the bird).

Has it always been a police car. (Michael Penn / Juneau Empire)
Police calls for Thursday, Nov. 26, 2020

This report contains public information from law enforcement and public safety agencies.

Construction of the new Glory Hall, above, is going smoothly, said executive director Mariya Lovishchuk on Nov. 24, 2020. (Courtesy photo / Thor Lindstam)
Building a brighter future: New Glory Hall reaches skyward

The structure is rapidly progressing, shouldering aside inclement weather.

This 2020 electron microscope image provided by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases - Rocky Mountain Laboratories shows SARS-CoV-2 virus particles which causes COVID-19, isolated from a patient in the U.S., emerging from the surface of cells cultured in a lab. On Monday, Oct. 5, 2020, the top U.S. public health agency said that coronavirus can spread greater distances through the air than 6 feet, particularly in poorly ventilated and enclosed spaces. But agency officials continued to say such spread is uncommon, and current social distancing guidelines still make sense. (NIAID-RML via AP)
COVID at a glance for Tuesday, Nov. 24

The most recent state and local numbers.

A sign seen near Twin Lakes on Sept. 17 encourages residents to wear cloth face coverings while in public. Health officials are asking Alaskans for help with contact tracing. (Ben Hohenstatt / Juneau Empire File)
Health officials seek help with virus notification

Recent surge created a contact tracing backlog.

Most Read