Claire Scott, 16, a junior at Juneau-Douglas High School: Yadaa.at Kalé, shows off her second published comic book, A Most Peculiar Alarm Clock, at Alaska Robotics Gallery on Tuesday, Nov. 12, 2019. Scott’s first book, Meow Cats United, was published last year. (Michael Penn | Juneau Empire)

Claire Scott, 16, a junior at Juneau-Douglas High School: Yadaa.at Kalé, shows off her second published comic book, A Most Peculiar Alarm Clock, at Alaska Robotics Gallery on Tuesday, Nov. 12, 2019. Scott’s first book, Meow Cats United, was published last year. (Michael Penn | Juneau Empire)

Great Scott! This 16-year-old Juneau student has published two graphic novels

High-schooler celebrates release of her second book

Claire Scott’s second graphic novel is meant to be a lot of people’s first experience with the medium.

The 16-year-old Juneau-Douglas High School: Yadaa.at Kalé student released her first graphic novel last year. She said her new effort, “A Most Peculiar Alarm Clock,” is meant to appeal to people with limited experience with the art form.

“I wanted a book that taught people how to read and enjoy comics,” Scott said. “I wanted to combine a graphic novel with a familiar format.”

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That familiar format is the short story. “A Most Peculiar Alarm Clock” tells the story of down-on-his luck Kevin Robbins and his extraordinary new alarm clock twice — once in the form of prose and once as a comic.

Claire Scott, 16, a junior at Juneau-Douglas High School: Yadaa.at Kalé, shows off her second published comic book, “A Most Peculiar Alarm Clock,” at Alaska Robotics Gallery on Tuesday, Nov. 12, 2019. Scott’s first book, “Meow Cats United,” was published last year. (Michael Penn | Juneau Empire)

Claire Scott, 16, a junior at Juneau-Douglas High School: Yadaa.at Kalé, shows off her second published comic book, “A Most Peculiar Alarm Clock,” at Alaska Robotics Gallery on Tuesday, Nov. 12, 2019. Scott’s first book, “Meow Cats United,” was published last year. (Michael Penn | Juneau Empire)

Scott said she opted for that instead of a short story with illustrations specifically because she envisioned the work as a way to familiarize folks with the storytelling conventions of graphic novels.

Plus, a short story with illustrations wouldn’t allow for the same amount of detail, Scott said, citing the old adage a picture is worth 1,000 words.

“I can put way more detail into the comic rather than the short story,” Scott said.

“A Most Peculiar Alarm Clock,” a new graphic novel by Claire Scott, tells the story of an unlucky man that comes into possession of the titular alarm clock. It is the 16-year-old Scott’s second graphic novel. (Courtesy Photo | Claire Scott)

“A Most Peculiar Alarm Clock,” a new graphic novel by Claire Scott, tells the story of an unlucky man that comes into possession of the titular alarm clock. It is the 16-year-old Scott’s second graphic novel. (Courtesy Photo | Claire Scott)

She said the work will appeal to people who like a cartoon-y art style and stories with elements of magical realism or dark fantasy. Scott cited the classic Talking Tina “Twilight Zone” segment as an influence on the new graphic novel.

The graphic novel will get a Nov. 16 release part at Alaska Robotics Gallery in downtown Juneau. Pat Race, owner of the gallery, said Scott is unusually accomplished for her age.

“She’s definitely one of the most-published graphic novelists in Juneau at the age of 16,” Race said in an interview. “She’s doing incredible work. She sold a lot of copies of her first book. It’s not just a fluffy thing.”

Claire Scott, 16, a junior at Juneau-Douglas High School: Yadaa.at Kalé, shows off her second published comic book, A Most Peculiar Alarm Clock, at Alaska Robotics Gallery on Tuesday, Nov. 12, 2019. Scott’s first book, Meow Cats United, was published last year. (Michael Penn | Juneau Empire)

Claire Scott, 16, a junior at Juneau-Douglas High School: Yadaa.at Kalé, shows off her second published comic book, A Most Peculiar Alarm Clock, at Alaska Robotics Gallery on Tuesday, Nov. 12, 2019. Scott’s first book, Meow Cats United, was published last year. (Michael Penn | Juneau Empire)

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Plus, he said Scott is getting valuable first-hand experience with the publishing process.

“It’s really been a big process to make these books,” Scott said. “I couldn’t do it without all my support.”

She said her mom, art teachers and the Alaskan Robotics Gallery owners are part of that support network. The Juneau Arts & Humanities Council also helped too with a $750 student scholarship, Scott said.

“A Most Peculiar Alarm Clock,” a new graphic novel by Claire Scott, tells the story of an unlucky man that comes into possession of the titular alarm clock. Scott said a classic “Twilight Zone” segment influence the story. (Courtesy Photo | Claire Scott)

“A Most Peculiar Alarm Clock,” a new graphic novel by Claire Scott, tells the story of an unlucky man that comes into possession of the titular alarm clock. Scott said a classic “Twilight Zone” segment influence the story. (Courtesy Photo | Claire Scott)

While “A Most Peculiar Alarm Clock” comes just one year after her last release, Scott said it may be a while before her third graphic novel comes to be.

“I am taking a break to work on submissions for my future for scholarships and what not,” Scott said. “So, there will be no book No. 3 soon, but I will keep creating stuff.”

Know & Go

What: Book release and signing for “A Most Peculiar Alarm Clock”

When: 5-6:30 p.m., Nov. 16

Where: Alaska Robotics Gallery, 220 Front St.


• Contact reporter Ben Hohenstatt at (907)523-2243 or bhohenstatt@juneauempire.com. Follow him on Twitter at @BenHohenstatt.


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