In this November 2018 file photo, suicide prevention-themed tattoos drawn by “Salty” Jack Reed Jr. wait for costumers during a special suicide prevention tattoo event. Suicide prevention is one of the causes helped by GCI’s 2019 giving campaign. (Ben Hohenstatt | Juneau Empire File)

In this November 2018 file photo, suicide prevention-themed tattoos drawn by “Salty” Jack Reed Jr. wait for costumers during a special suicide prevention tattoo event. Suicide prevention is one of the causes helped by GCI’s 2019 giving campaign. (Ben Hohenstatt | Juneau Empire File)

GCI gives to suicide prevention and more

Downtown Juneau business on the move as well

Through its nonprofit partnership program, GCI has helped for the past two years to fund suicide prevention programs in Juneau middle schools and University of Alaska Southeast like Juneau Youth Services and the Sources of Strength programs.

Suicide prevention will be an area of giving for GCI in 2019, too, according to a press release announcing recipients of its 2019 philanthropy campaign, which included 12 nonprofits that work throughout the state.

Each of the 12 nonprofits will be highlighted by GCI during a monthly “spotlight” campaign that includes promotional signs and digital displays at GCI’s more than 30 retail stores, features on GCI social media channels and promotion on iHeart radio stations.

“There are so many nonprofits in Alaska doing all kinds of incredible work,” Senior Vice President of Consumer Services Paul Landes said in a press release. “One reason these organizations were selected is that they, much like GCI, have the ability to reach every corner of the state. Whether spreading awareness about heart health, helping Alaska’s homeless youth in crisis, or advocating for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities, these organizations help Alaskans from Sitka to Bethel.”

GCI’s 2019 monthly nonprofit partners are: American Red Cross of Alaska, American Heart Association, Alaska School Activities Association, Native Youth Olympics, USO, Camp Fire Alaska, Alaska Zoo, Covenant House Alaska, GCI Suicide Prevention Grant recipients through the Alaska Community Foundation, American Cancer Society, Food Bank of Alaska and Special Olympics Alaska.

Annie Kaill’s is moving

After 35 years at its current location, Annie Kaill’s is moving this spring to Seward Street.

The new location will be at 124 Seward St. — near Heritage Coffee and across the street from The Rookery and Shoefly. It will offer a custom renovated space, more room for stock and the space to open a new in-house custom framing shop. They will also update their computers and inventory system and introduce new artists and merchandise.

There will be a farewell party for the old Front Street location during First Friday.

The new Seward Street location will open in March. A soft opening show is planned for April and a grand opening is planned for May.

New art show theme at the visitor center

A new month means a new theme for the revolving art show at the Mendenhall Glacier Visitor Center.

Outdoor education nonprofit Discovery Southeast is presenting a third month-long art show at the visitor center. Each month highlights a different theme corresponding to the U.S. Forest Service’s Fireside Lecture Series and features local artists.

“Discovery Southeast and the Forest Service are thrilled to showcase local artists, and make sure the Mendenhall Glacier Visitor Center is a community space for Juneau,” AnnMarie Ellison, who manages Discovery Southeast’s bookstore at the visitor center, said in a press release.

March’s theme is “Lesser Known Winged Things of Alaska” and premieres Friday, March 1.

Art can be viewed during Mendenhall Glacier Visitor Center winter hours Friday-Sunday 10 a.m.-4 p.m. as well as during Friday evening Fireside Lectures at 6:30 and 8 p.m.

Sealaska Heritage sponsors horn spoon carving with Steve Brown

Sealaska Heritage Institution is sponsoring horn spoon carving classes with Steve Brown as part of its Northwest Coast art class. Applications are due by Feb. 28, and there is a $25 instruction fee.

The classes run 8 a.m.-5 p.m. with a lunch break from noon-1 p.m., from Thursday, March 7 through Sunday, March 10 at Gajaa Hit, 250 Village St.

The Juneau Artists Gallery announces grand reopening

Juneau Artists Gallery, a cooperative gallery, is preparing for a celebratory First Friday with refreshments from 4:30-7 p.m. on March 1, the gallery announced in a press release.

The artists gallery was forced to close for most of the month of February because after-hours vandalism resulted in flooding at the gallery and in other businesses in the Senate Building.

Damage has been repaired, new flooring has been installed, and 20-plus local artists will be rehanging their artwork this week in preparation for the reopening.

Christine Kleinhenz hangs some of her work at Juneau Artists Gallery ahead of a grand reopening planned for March 1, 2019. (Courtesy photo | Juneau Artists Gallery)

Christine Kleinhenz hangs some of her work at Juneau Artists Gallery ahead of a grand reopening planned for March 1, 2019. (Courtesy photo | Juneau Artists Gallery)

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