Feds charge Juneau man in child porn case

A federal grand jury indicted a Juneau man Tuesday on a single count of receiving child pornography, the U.S. Attorney for the District of Alaska announced in a press release Wednesday.

Jim Wayne Thornhill, 38, is accused of receiving child pornography sometime between Nov. 3 and Dec. 25 of 2014. He is currently incarcerated for violating conditions of his probation related to a prior conviction for sexual abuse of a minor.

Thornhill faces 15 to 40 years in prison for the present offense, with an additional five years to life on supervised release, the press release states.

Further information about the case against Thornhill is not yet available.

Assistant U. S. Attorney Jack S. Schmidt is prosecuting the case and said that an arraignment date will not be set until state proceedings in the probation violation case are settled.

Prosecutors credited the Federal Bureau of Investigation for investigating Thornhill, which resulted in the charge.

If the public has any further information, questions or concerns about Thornhill’s activities, contact the FBI at 265-8254.

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