David Tomeo’s son Will runs down a trail while the five puppies chase him. This year marks 100 years since the national park began the program of owning and raising Alaskan Huskies to serve as sled dogs throughout the park — which continues to remain the only sled dog operation in the federal government. (Courtesy / David Tomeo)

David Tomeo’s son Will runs down a trail while the five puppies chase him. This year marks 100 years since the national park began the program of owning and raising Alaskan Huskies to serve as sled dogs throughout the park — which continues to remain the only sled dog operation in the federal government. (Courtesy / David Tomeo)

Even when it’s not National Dog Day, it’s puppies 24/7 with Denali’s sled dog cam

Sad? Mad? Happy? Puppies are always the answer.

If you were to hop onto the Denali National Park and Preserve website and check out its live puppy cam, you’d be sharing a moment with the approximately 1,000 other people per day who heck out the live footage to get a dose of serotonin.

To celebrate this Friday’s National Dog Day — and every day until late September — people across the globe can tune in to watch Denali National Park’s next generation of “canine rangers” grow and learn what it takes to become a sled dog in one of the nation’s most-beloved national parks. This year marks 100 years since the national park began the program of owning and raising Alaskan huskies to serve as sled dogs throughout the park — which continues to remain the only sled dog operation in the federal government. These four-legged park rangers have played a vital role in the park for the century these dogs have called Denali home said David Tomeo, the kennels manager and park ranger Denali National Park and Preserve.

Currently, the park hosts 32 dogs including three out of the five puppies born in this year’s litter. For more than a decade the park has shared live camera viewing online for people across the internet to watch the little pups grow and each year the camera seems to be bringing in more and more of an audience, said Tomeo.

From recently checking the camera’s data, he said the park has had more than 50,000 people check out the cam since it went live in mid-July, and it brings in a daily viewing average of just shy of 1,000 per day. This year’s star puppies born on June 18 share their names with the first sled dog team to ever patrolling of the park in 1922 when the program started. The litter of five born from Denali’s lead sled dog sire, Steward, and the partner kennel-owned mother, Olive, were recently split with two of the puppies, Dynamite and Rowdy, headed back with their mother Olive to their home kennel.

Puppies Mike, Bos’n and Skipper are still with the park and all are doing well and are healthy, said Tomeo.

From left to right, puppies Mike, Bos’n, and Skipper cuddle up in their dog house. The litter of five born from Denali’s lead sled dog sire, Steward, and the partner kennel-owned mother, Olive, were recently split with two of the puppies, Dynamite and Rowdy, headed back with their mother Olive to their home kennel. (Courtesy / National Park Service)

From left to right, puppies Mike, Bos’n, and Skipper cuddle up in their dog house. The litter of five born from Denali’s lead sled dog sire, Steward, and the partner kennel-owned mother, Olive, were recently split with two of the puppies, Dynamite and Rowdy, headed back with their mother Olive to their home kennel. (Courtesy / National Park Service)

“They’re building their confidence,” he said. “This whole late summer and early fall they’ll be going on walks with us and we try to take them where they might encounter new and strange things like climbing over rocks or going through a small creek — we want them to trust us.”

He said the pups won’t be officially a part of the team until next winter when they are grown and trained, but they will spend this winter running alongside the team and camping with them as they learn the ropes.

“By late winter they are running alongside the adults, they’ll even hop in the line and pretend like they’re pulling and that’s when we know they’re ready and by the end of the winter they will start to pull on some short runs,” he said.

From there the pups will continue to hang with the older dogs until next winter when they’re official “canine rangers” and pulling the sleds on patrol with the rest of the adults. He said though having the dogs is a joy for many and continues to remain a large interest to the public who visit the park, they first and foremost serve a very important role in the park, and across Alaska.

“The dog teams are a tool that we use to get out and work in the park and we’re doing it for wilderness preservation and honoring that wilderness by using traditional tools — and dog sledding has been recognized as people have been on this land for thousands of years.”

He said it’s important to the park to protect the land and uphold the promise to the American people that it will continue to preserve the 2 million acres of Denali forest that prohibits motorized vehicles by using dogs as a means of transportation instead. He said it’s also important to the park to celebrate the culture behind dog sledding in Alaska and honor the tradition.

“We’re hoping to preserve the cultural heritage that dog sledding is,” he said.” It’s a part of the history of Alaska and has been done here for thousands of years by Native Alaskans and we hope to continue demonstrating this tradition to preserve that heritage.”

Sharon Stiteler, the Public Affairs Officer for the park, said she knew the puppy cam was popular since it first started, but was surprise to see how quickly it gained popularity this year.

“Before I even worked for Denali I remember my friends going bananas for the puppy cam,” she said.” I think that when you’re working at a mundane job or a slower job, the fact that you can have a live puppy cam going in the background is kind of a nice break. One thing I really love is sometimes the staff will take the puppies and hold them up to the camera.”

She said it’s “amazing” to see how much of a strong connection that people have to the dogs and the community that the dogs have formed over the years and said she is excited for more people to find joy in the watching the dogs.

Alaska’s favorite breeds

Ahead of National Dog Day, TOP Data released a ranking of the most popular dog breeds in each state.

To compile the list, TOP Data analyzed a dog adoption database of 500,000 adopted dogs, online adoption data and surveyed 1,000 dog owners across the U.S., according to the global marketing agency. Here’s a run down of Alaska’s top dogs:

No.1 Labrador retriever

No.2 Mutt

No.3 Chihuahua

No.4 Pit bull

No.5 German shepherd dog

• Contact reporter Clarise Larson at clarise.larson@juneauempire.com or (651)-528-1807. Follow her on Twitter at @clariselarson.

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