Brian Holst, executive director of the Juneau Economic Development Council, speaks about the council’s economic indicator report to the Juneau Chamber of Commerce during its weekly luncheon at the Moose Lodge on Thursday, Oct. 3, 2019. (Michael Penn | Juneau Empire)

Brian Holst, executive director of the Juneau Economic Development Council, speaks about the council’s economic indicator report to the Juneau Chamber of Commerce during its weekly luncheon at the Moose Lodge on Thursday, Oct. 3, 2019. (Michael Penn | Juneau Empire)

Empire Live: Brian Holst speaks at the Chamber Luncheon

Live updates from the Luncheon.

Summary

The local economy is in relatively good standing, Holst told the crowd. Tourism and mining are growing industries that are providing good jobs. The private sector has been able to consistently provide compensation for lost government jobs.

12:55 p.m.

It’s critical that we look at growing entrepreneurship, Holst says, you need to encourage people to take risks in your community.

Tourism is growing and the winter economy needs development.

Stable government will lead to growth for Juneau, Holst says.

12:50 p.m.

If trends continue, Holst says, 50 percent of people will be freelance contract workers, he says. That means that come people will have jobs but also participate in freelance jobs in the so-called “gig economy.”

Juneau has a high cost of living, slightly higher than other cities in Alaska. The largest contributor to that cost is health care, he says.

12:45 p.m.

Construction industry is continue to produce solidly, in terms of homes and rental construction. The city is at roughly six percent vacancies, which is ideal for a city to have.

Home sales are looking good and prices continue to go up. Days on market is short and prices are sold in favor of the seller, Holst says.

12:40 p.m.

The 20-39 year-old group is a growing portion of the population which is a good sign, Holst says, lots of entrepreneurship in that group.

Juneau has one of the lowest unemployment rates in the state and 45 percent of households have an income of $100,000 or more.

Thirty percent of Juneau households have retirement income which, Holst says, is a source of stability in the local economy.

12:35 p.m.

There is a 2,800 job gap between July and December, he says, saying there is growth in summer jobs but losses in winter jobs.

Juneau is the most visited city in Alaska, Holst says, showing a graph that shows a steadily increasing number of cruise ship passengers visiting each year.

Traded industry jobs, jobs that involve the exchange of goods such as mining or seafood, have grown from 2009 to 2018.

12:30 p.m.

Highest paying sectors of the economy are mining and federal government, he says, showing a graph with the size and various industries.

This is the eighth straight year that we’ve lost government jobs in Juneau.

Overall state government is diminishing but not as fast in Anchorage as other parts of the state, Holst says.

12:25 p.m.

Government is a drag on our economy, he says, while tourism and mining are contributing to growth.

Three sectors contribute almost as much earning to the economy as all remaining sectors combined, he tells the crowd, Mining, state government, and local government.

Mining is really, really important for Juneau’s economy he says.

“Today we’re all a little bit richer,” Holst says in reference to Permanent Fund Dividend payments being made today.

Holst takes the stage to present this year’s economic indicators report from the Juneau Economic Development Council.

12:18 p.m.

Introductions are just beginning as chamber members finish their lunches.

12 p.m.

Brian Holst of the Juneau Economic Development Council and member of the School Board is speaking at this week’s Juneau Chamber of Commerce Luncheon at the Moose Family Lodge.


• Contact reporter Peter Segall at 523-2228 or psegall@juneauempire.com.


More in News

The Aurora Borealis glows over the Mendenhall Glacier in 2014. (Michael Penn / Juneau Empire File)
Aurora forecast

Forecasts from the University of Alaska Fairbanks’ Geophysical Institute for the week of Nov. 27

Steve Lewis, foreground, and Stephen Sorensen from the Alaska State Review Board scan ballots from precincts where they were hand counted at the Division of Elections office Nov. 15. Board officials spent the period between the Nov. 8 election and its certification Wednesday performing about 20 different to verify the results. (Mark Sabbatini / Juneau Empire)
Election certified, but challenges pending

Outcome of at least two state House races unknown, which may determine chamber’s leadership

Errol Culbreth and Scotlyn Beck (Polichinelles) rehearse ahead of Juneau Dance Theatre’s production of “The Nutcracker.” The immensely popular ballet is coming to the Juneau-Douglas High School: Yadaa.at Kalé Friday through Sunday. (Ben Hohenstatt / Juneau Empire)
Juneau Dance Theatre is ready to get cracking

“The Nutcracker” is set to run Friday, Saturday and Sunday.

In this photo provided by the National Transportation Safety Board, NTSB investigator Clint Crookshanks, left, and member Jennifer Homendy stand near the site of some of the wreckage of the DHC-2 Beaver, Wednesday, May 15, 2019, that was involved in a midair collision near Ketchikan. The National Transportation Safety Board said Tuesday that the Federal Aviation Administration should tighten rules about minimum visibility during flights and require more weather training for pilots who fly around Ketchikan.  (Peter Knudson/NTSB via AP)
Safety board recommends new measures for Alaska air tours

The board wants regulations for Ketchikan similar to requirements in Hawaii and the Grand Canyon.

(Michael Penn / Juneau Empire File)
Police calls for Wednesday, Nov.30

This report contains information from law enforcement and public safety agencies.

Harbor seals have a face full of whiskers, which the seals use to follow hydrodynamic wakes left by prey fish; even a blind seal can track a fish this way, discriminating victims by size and shape and direction of movement.  (Courtesy Photo / Jos Bakker)
On the Trails: The sense of touch

Touch is a mechanical sense, detecting physical stimuli such as pressure, texture,… Continue reading

(Michael Penn / Juneau Empire File)
Police calls for Tuesday, Nov. 29

This report contains information from law enforcement and public safety agencies.

(Michael Penn / Juneau Empire File)
Police calls for Saturday, Nov. 26

This report contains information from law enforcement and public safety agencies.

Sugar Bear Alaskan Treasures, seen here, was one of many artist vendors featured at the Central Council of the Tlingit and Haida Indian Tribes of Alaska Indigenous Artists & Vendors Holiday Market from noon to 5 p.m. on Friday through Sunday at Elizabeth Peratrovich Hall. (Jonson Kuhn / Juneau Empire)
Indigenous Holiday Market features local artists

Market’s first return since 2018.

Most Read