In this July 2020 photo, a sign on a Mendenhall Valley business advertises Permanent Fund dividend sales. Payments for this year’s PFD will start July 20, Gov. Mike Dunleavy announced Friday. (Peter Segall / Juneau Empire File)

In this July 2020 photo, a sign on a Mendenhall Valley business advertises Permanent Fund dividend sales. Payments for this year’s PFD will start July 20, Gov. Mike Dunleavy announced Friday. (Peter Segall / Juneau Empire File)

Dunleavy: PFD payments start Sept. 20

That’s weeks earlier than is typical.

Electronic payment of Permanent Fund dividends, which are expected to exceed $3,200, will start Sept. 20, a few weeks ahead of the usual payout in early October, Gov. Mike Dunleavy announced Friday.

Eligible applicants opting for direct deposit that have been approved by Sept. 9 will receive a single payment on the 20th, the governor said in a prepared statement. Those filing paper applications and/or requesting paper checks will receive dividends starting the week of Oct. 3.

Dunleavy, who made what he called “full” dividend checks a centerpiece of his political agenda, included some election-year promoting in his announcement even though the payments are less than the $5,500 some state politicians sought.

“Alaskans have waited seven long years to receive a fair and sizeable dividend, and it couldn’t have come at a more important time,” he said. “Alaskans, especially in rural communities, will have to pay extraordinarily high fuel and heating oil bills this winter, and rampant inflation is forcing all Alaskan families to pay more for basic needs, like food and medicine.”

The Permanent Fund dividend was the most contentious budget item during this year’s legislative session, with the Senate at one point proposing a $4,200 dividend payment — based on the state’s statutory formula set in law, but not followed by lawmakers since 2016 — plus an energy relief payment of $1,300. Ultimately the Legislature approved a dividend of about $2,550 plus a $650 energy relief payment.

Lawmakers resisting the higher payment amount said, among other things, while skyrocketing oil prices were a boon to Alaska’s bottom line for the time being, a drop in prices would mean spending reserve funds, imposing taxes and/or making major spending cuts to cover shortfalls.

Dunleavy also used Friday’s purported public service announcement to push his ongoing policy goals

“We need to stop determining what amount the PFD will be using an arbitrary political process,” he said. “Alaskans deserve a constitutional amendment that protects the PFD from politicians and special interests, and sets out a funding formula we can all count on.”

The governor said that while some people were hoping for payments earlier than Sept. 20, the Permanent Fund Division ”needs adequate time to process as many outstanding applications as possible and to screen out fraudulent applications.”

Answers to frequently asked questions about this year’s dividend is at the state Department of Revenue’s website. A video announcement by Dunleavy about the payment dates is below.

Contact reporter Mark Sabbatini at mark.sabbatini@juneauempire.com.

More in News

A Princess Cruise Line ship is docked in Juneau on Aug. 25, 2021. (Michael Lockett / Juneau Empire File)
Ships in Port for the week of Aug. 7

Here’s what to expect this week.

From left, Kelsey Dean, watershed scientist with the Southeast Alaska Watershed Coalition, and Kaagwaan Eesh Manuel Rose-Bell of Keex’ Kwáan watch as crew members set up tools to drag a log into place. Healthy salmon habitat requires woody debris, typically provided by falling branches and trees, which helps create deep salmon pools and varied stream structure. (Courtesy Photos / Mary Catharine Martin)
 
The SalmonState: Bringing the sockeye home

Klawock Indigenous Stewards and partners are working to a once prolific sockeye salmon run.

(Michael Penn / Juneau Empire File)
Police ID man missing from cruise ship

Coast Guard suspends search efforts

(Juneau Empire File / Michael Penn)
Police calls for Saturday, Aug. 10, 2022

This report contains public information from law enforcement and public safety agencies.

A northern oriole used dietary carotenoids to make its feathers bright orange. (Courtesy Photo / J. S. Willson)
On the Trails: The colorful world of birds

Colors are produced by cell structure, which can scatter light rays, making… Continue reading

(Juneau Empire File / Michael Penn)
Police calls for Saturday, Aug. 9, 2022

This report contains public information from law enforcement and public safety agencies.

(Juneau Empire File / Michael Penn)
Police calls for Saturday, Aug. 6, 2022

This report contains public information from law enforcement and public safety agencies.

Ice fog, a phrase in Russell Tabbert’s Dictionary of Alaskan English, is not uttered in many other places because to form it takes a sustained temperature of minus 35 F. (Courtesy Photo / Ned Rozell)
Alaska Science Forum: Alaska lexicon sinks in over the years

When my little Ford pickup chugged into Alaska 36 years ago this… Continue reading

Mimi Israelah, center, cheers for Donald Trump inside the Alaska Airlines Center in Anchorage, Alaska, during a rally Saturday July 9, 2022. Two Anchorage police officers violated department policy during a traffic stop last month when Israelah, in town for a rally by former President Donald Trump showed a "white privilege card" instead of a driver's license and was not ticketed. (Bill Roth / Anchorage Daily News)
Alaska officers violated policy in ‘white privilege’ stop

It’s unclear what policy was violated or what disciplinary actions the two officers faced.

Most Read