Gov. Mike Dunleavy is greeted by people attending the Alaskans for Life, Inc. annual Rally for Life in front of the Capitol on Tuesday, Jan. 22, 2019. (Michael Penn | Juneau Empire)

Gov. Mike Dunleavy is greeted by people attending the Alaskans for Life, Inc. annual Rally for Life in front of the Capitol on Tuesday, Jan. 22, 2019. (Michael Penn | Juneau Empire)

Dunleavy announces latest round of appointments

Juneau resident reappointed to real estate commission

The Dunleavy administration announced 16 new appointments to various boards and commissions Tuesday afternoon.

One person from Juneau is on the list: PeggyAnn McConnochie was reappointed to the state’s Real Estate Commission, to a term running from March 1 to March 1, 2021.

Along with McConnochie are Margaret Nelson of Anchorage, Jesse Sumner of Wasilla, Jamie Matthews of Glennallen, Cheryl Markwood of Fairbanks and Michael Tavoliero of Eagle River.

[Father of deceased Kotzebue girl among Dunleavy’s new appointments]

Anchorage resident Suzanne Hancock was appointed to the Alaska Public Offices Commission (APOC). To the Board of Dental Examiners, Dunleavy appointed Dr. Jesse Hronkin of Wasilla, Dr. Timothy “Jon” Woller of Fairbanks, Dr. Kelly Lucas of Wasilla and Brittany Dschaak of Dillingham. Dr. David Nielson of Anchorage was reappointed to the board.

Soldotna Dr. Brad Cross was appointed to the Board of Examiners in Optometry. Dr. Noah Shields of Kenai landed on the Board of Marital and Family Therapy. Emmonak resident Marilyn Charles was appointed to the Fisherman’s Fund Advisory and Appeals Council. Dan Sullivan of Anchorage was appointed to the Regulatory Commission of Alaska.

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