Hearthside Books is moving out of its longtime home in the Triangle Building at the corner of Franklin and Front Streets and moving to a new location in the Wharf. (Michael Penn | Juneau Empire)

Hearthside Books is moving out of its longtime home in the Triangle Building at the corner of Franklin and Front Streets and moving to a new location in the Wharf. (Michael Penn | Juneau Empire)

Downtown bookstore is on the move

They’re booking it from Front Street.

A longtime Front Street store is booking it to the Merchant’s Wharf.

Hearthside Books owner Brenda Weaver said her business will be moving later this month and will probably be closed around Oct. 23 and 24, so the new location’s phone lines and internet connection can be set up.

“That’s where we started 45 years ago,” Weaver said of the waterfront location in a phone interview.

[Author born in Juneau publishes debut book]

Back then, Debbie Reifenstein and Susan Hickey owned the store, and they moved the store from the Wharf a short time after its opening. They sold Hearthside to Weaver in 2014.

Hearthside Books is moving out of its longtime home in the Triangle Building at the corner of Franklin and Front Streets and moving to a new location in the Wharf. (Michael Penn | Juneau Empire)

Hearthside Books is moving out of its longtime home in the Triangle Building at the corner of Franklin and Front Streets and moving to a new location in the Wharf. (Michael Penn | Juneau Empire)

For more than 40 years, the store has had its downtown presence — there’s also a Hearthside Books in the Nugget Mall — at its current location, Weaver said.

“It’s going to be sad to leave the corner of Front and Franklin,” Weaver said.

The old downtown location will get a farewell Friday during First Friday events, Weaver said, and the new location is expected to be up and running for the monthly arts and culture celebration downtown for November’s First Friday. Weaver said November author events at the new location are already planned.

[See what else is happening for First Friday]

Weaver said she hadn’t heard what might take the bookstore’s place on Front Street.

While Hearthside has been on Front Street for a long time, Weaver said the store does not own the site — the Juneau Assessor’s Database lists the owner as Skagway Jewelry — and a move to the Wharf made business sense.

“It’s just an opportunity that came up,” Weaver said. “It does save some overhead. We weighed the pros and cons of moving.”

Hearthside Books is moving to a new location in the Wharf, formerly the location of Juneau Outfitters. (Michael Penn | Juneau Empire)

Hearthside Books is moving to a new location in the Wharf, formerly the location of Juneau Outfitters. (Michael Penn | Juneau Empire)

The new location will offer about the same amount of space with the exception of the downtown store’s “kiddie loft” at a relative savings, Weaver said. She said the new site also offers more parking for locals and shoppers may pop in while waiting for meals or visiting other stores in the Merchant’s Wharf.

Weaver said the move will also provide a chance for taking stock of inventory and making sure records match the products on hand.

She said the move is not expected to cause staffing changes.

“We have a really good, steady staff,” Weaver said.


• Contact reporter Ben Hohenstatt at (907)523-2243 or bhohenstatt@juneauempire.com. Follow him on Twitter at @BenHohenstatt.


More in News

Jasmine Chavez, a crew member aboard the Quantum of the Seas cruise ship, waves to her family during a cell phone conversation after disembarking from the ship at Marine Park on May 10. (Mark Sabbatini / Juneau Empire file photo)
Ships in port for the week of July 13

Here’s what to expect this week.

(Michael Penn / Juneau Empire file photo)
Police calls for Wedesday, July 17, 2024

This report contains public information from law enforcement and public safety agencies.

Cars arrive at Juneau International Airport on Thursday, July 11, 2024. (Mark Sabbatini / Juneau Empire file photo)
Juneau seems to have avoided major disruptions following global technology-related outage

911 centers, hospitals, airport, and public safety and emergency management agencies are operating.

People take photos of local dignitaries during the ribbon-cutting ceremony at the Teal Street Center on Thursday afternoon. (Mark Sabbatini / Juneau Empire)
Teal Street Center celebrates with ribbon-cutting a year after social agencies begin providing services

Nine organizations providing legal, disability, counseling and other help open under one roof.

Alaska Permanent Fund Corp. board chairman Ethan Schutt is seen during a special board meeting on Monday, Oct. 3, 2022, in Juneau. (James Brooks/Alaska Beacon)
Dunleavy reappoints Permanent Fund Corp. board chair Schutt after weeks of uncertainty

Gov. Mike Dunleavy has reappointed Ethan Schutt to a public seat on… Continue reading

Employees gather in front the historic Red Onion Saloon in Skagway, which will be taken over by Juneau restaurant owner Tracy LaBarge at the end of the summer tourism season. (Photo courtesy of the Red Onion Saloon)
Owner of Tracy’s King Crab Shack buys historic Red Onion Saloon in Skagway

Tracy LaBarge will take over the establishment after the 2024 summer tourism season

A memorial started on Front Street in downtown Juneau for 35-year-old Juneau resident Steven Kissack, who was experiencing homelessness, grows on Thursday with food donations and suicide hotline information. (Jasz Garrett / Juneau Empire)
As the death investigation of Steven Kissack begins, special prosecution office explains its process

Reviews can be lengthy, information limited to ensure due process, Department of Law leaders say

In this screenshot from a streamed court hearing, Attorney Thekla Hansen-Young (bottom right) speaks in front of a three-judge panel of the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals on July 18, 2024, in San Francisco. (Screenshot)
Federal appeals court appears unlikely to halt Southeast Alaska king trolling for now

A lower-court order that could stop fishing has been placed on hold since last year.

Bulk food in Food Bank of Alaska’s Anchorage warehouse on April 21, 2023. (Claire Stremple/Alaska Beacon)

Most Read