Zuriel Kerr, 4, works on coloring her monster during a How to Make a Monster workshop with artist Glo Rameriz Saturday afternoon at Douglas Public Library.(Ben Hohenstatt | Capital City Weekly)

Zuriel Kerr, 4, works on coloring her monster during a How to Make a Monster workshop with artist Glo Rameriz Saturday afternoon at Douglas Public Library.(Ben Hohenstatt | Capital City Weekly)

Douglas Public Library hosts monster-making event

Kids enjoy art event

Furry or scaly, fearsome or silly, happy or angry, crayon or glitter — Douglas Public Library had every sort of monster imaginable.

The library held a How to Make a Monster workshop with artist Glo Rameriz Saturday afternoon, and a roomful of children tried their hands at making their own monsters.

“We’re using our emotions to make our cute or not-so-cute creatures,” Rameriz said.

The program was offered as part of a grant from the American Library Association and PBS.

Before the young attendees tried their hand at making monsters, Rameriz drew her own monster on a whiteboard and explained how her move from Puerto Rico to Juneau inspired some of its features.

“Just the idea of moving from home and encountering all of these new things,” Ramirez said. “It’s a therapeutic way of putting our experience out there.”

Some children drew monsters freehand with an assortment of coloring utensils and art supplies that were available, while others colored-in monsters that Ramirez pre-made.

Participants said they were enjoying the event.

Farrah Fremlin, 8, drew multiple monsters. One was short, squat and snoozin, another was an angry lightning bolt-shaped monster, and a fire-breathing but friendly monster was in the works.

Fremlin said she generally enjoys drawing.

“It’s calming,” she said.

Isabella Davidson, 10, drew a round-headed monster inspired in part by her brother Beckett’s fondness for balloons.

She explained her monster’s features and general design.

“He lives out in the wild, and he’s part of nature,” Isabella Davidson said. “His antlers are actually plants. He can never have his eyebrows down, and he can never have a frown on his face, and his flight goggles are very fashionable.”

Many children at the a How to Make a Monster workshop with artist Glo Rameriz at Douglas Public Library drew their own monsters, but there were some pre-drawn for kids like Ezra Rios, 3, to color. (Ben Hohenstatt | Capital City Weekly)

Many children at the a How to Make a Monster workshop with artist Glo Rameriz at Douglas Public Library drew their own monsters, but there were some pre-drawn for kids like Ezra Rios, 3, to color. (Ben Hohenstatt | Capital City Weekly)

Farrah Fremlin, 8, said she finds coloring calming during a How to Make a Monster workshop with artist Glo Rameriz Saturday afternoon at Douglas Public Library. (Ben Hohenstatt | Capital City Weekly)

Farrah Fremlin, 8, said she finds coloring calming during a How to Make a Monster workshop with artist Glo Rameriz Saturday afternoon at Douglas Public Library. (Ben Hohenstatt | Capital City Weekly)

Isabella Davidsion, 10, and her brother, Beckett, posed and smiled for their mother during a How to Make a Monster workshop with artist Glo Rameriz. They mugged in the middle of a frame made by Ramirez. The siblings also drew monsters. (Ben Hohenstatt | Capital City Weekly)

Isabella Davidsion, 10, and her brother, Beckett, posed and smiled for their mother during a How to Make a Monster workshop with artist Glo Rameriz. They mugged in the middle of a frame made by Ramirez. The siblings also drew monsters. (Ben Hohenstatt | Capital City Weekly)

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