A number of sentencings by a U.S. District Court judge were announced on Thursday for several unrelated arrests that had occurred over the last several years. (Michael S. Lockett / Juneau Empire)

A number of sentencings by a U.S. District Court judge were announced on Thursday for several unrelated arrests that had occurred over the last several years. (Michael S. Lockett / Juneau Empire)

Department of Justice announces multiple criminal sentencings

The three suspects, arrested across the Southeast over the last four years, were not related to each other.

The U.S. Department of Justice announced multiple sentencings for people charged in crimes over the last several years.

The incidents leading to the charges were unrelated, and were announced in separate news releases.

All three sentencings were announced by U.S. District Court Judge Timothy Burgess on Thursday. Assistant U.S. Attorney Jack Schmidt prosecuted all three cases.

2018 drug arrest

In 2018, Roderick Ayers, 33, was arrested for possession of methamphetamine with intent to distribute, according to the DOJ.

Ayers concealed 10 ounces of methamphetamine and shipped it to a drug user in Juneau, according to the DOJ. JPD obtained a warrant before seizing the shipment, finding Ayers’ fingerprints on the drug container.

In February, a confidential informant bought an ounce of heroin for $1,800 from Ayers, who sent it via the U.S. Postal Service, according to the DOJ. Ayers was arrested in Washington and held in custody.

“Individuals like Ayers and the illicit drugs that are shipped to Alaska leave a trail of destruction in our communities and we will not idly standby and watch,” said U.S. Attorney S. Lane Tucker in the news release. “Today’s sentence sends a message that we take drug trafficking crimes very seriously in Alaska and we will continue to vigorously prosecute traffickers, wherever they may live, for their illegal actions.”

Ayers was sentenced to eight years imprisonment with three years of supervised release, according to the DOJ. JPD, the FBI and the USPS Inspection Service investigated the case.

2020 illegal possession of firearms

A Juneau man arrested in May of 2020 for illegal possession of firearms was sentenced to six and half years imprisonment followed by three years of supervised release, according to the DOJ.

Clyde Edward Pasterski Jr., 42, was arrested in May 2020 after JPD executed a search warrant at his residence following Pasterski’s detainment at a traffic stop, the Empire previously reported. Officers investigated the residence found 13 firearms, one stolen, eight seal bombs, a plate carrier with steel plates, four grams of heroin and two grams of methamphetamine.

While being placed under arrested, JPD reported Pasterski attempted to grab an officer’s sidearm and was subsequently struck by a baton, the Empire previously reported.

“Mr. Pasterski knew he was not allowed to have firearms, but rather than follow the law he chose to procure and possess at least 13 more of them,” said Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives Seattle Field Division Special Agent in Charge Jonathan T. McPherson. “His actions during and after his arrest show how dangerous he is to the community, so this sentence is well earned.”

JPD and the ATF investigated the case, according to the DOJ.

2020 illegal possession of ammunition

A Klawock man arrested for illegal possession of ammunition was sentenced to 16 months imprisonment followed by two years of supervised release, according to a news release.

Michael Delane Howard, 36, purchased 1,000 rounds of .223 ammunition from Log Cabin Sporting Goods in Craig on April 22. An investigation revealed Howard had access to several firearms, and an acquaintance of Howard’s had also made several ammunition purchases, according to the news release.

“Actions like those Mr. Howard took to get firearms, despite his prohibition as a convicted felon, shows how much disregard he has for the law,” McPherson said in a news release. “Having his significant other purchase firearms for him further exacerbated Howard’s crimes. We will also work to identify and investigate straw purchasers who put firearms in the hands of convicted felons.”

The Craig Police Department and the ATF investigated the case.

• Contact reporter Michael S. Lockett at 757-621-1197 or mlockett@juneauempire.com.

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