Death Notice: Ronald Allen Peterson Sr.

Ronald Allen Peterson Sr. passed away unexpectedly but peacefully Sept. 4, 2018.

Peterson was born Aug. 8, 1941 in Juneau, Alaska where his family owned and operated a dairy farm. Having a natural mechanical ability, he developed and honed mechanical skills that served him very well throughout his life.

Highlights of Peterson’s career with the State of Alaska included manager of the Alaska State Equipment Fleet for numerous years prior to retiring. He also became certified as an airframe and power plant senior mechanic and inspector while employed by Alaska Airlines in Juneau and Seattle. Boating and fishing for salmon and halibut were high on his list of favorite recreations while living in Southeast Alaska. After relocating to the Olympic Peninsula, attending vintage car shows became a favorite pastime.

Married in 1961 to Sharon Dunlap of Port Angeles, Washington, they welcomed three offspring in following years: Kimberly of Juneau; Ron Jr. and Christine, both of Port Angeles. As well as Sharon, other survivors include brothers John and David and sisters Carol, Dody, Linda and Donna.

As was his wish, Peterson’s remains were cremated and his ashes will be scattered in Southeast Alaska at a later date.

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