Rep. Chuck Kopp, R-Anchorage, speaks in support of his bill to recognize Alaska’s 229 already federally-recognized tribes on Friday, March 13, 2020. (Peter Segall | Juneau Empire)

Rep. Chuck Kopp, R-Anchorage, speaks in support of his bill to recognize Alaska’s 229 already federally-recognized tribes on Friday, March 13, 2020. (Peter Segall | Juneau Empire)

Capitol Live: House adjourns to Monday, leaves bills on calender

Live updates from the Capitol.

Summary: Correction: This article incorrectly stated the House had passed HB 221. The House did not vote on that bill and instead voted to adjourn. The three members who listed below voted against adjourning, not against HB 221. The Empire regrets this error.

After a long at ease, the House votes to adjourn so members can attend a meeting of the recently formed COVID-19 working Group. The adjournment vote passes with 29 yeas and 3 nays from Eastman, Rep. Ben Carpenter, R-Nikiski, and Sharon Jackson, R-Eagle River.

11:40 A.M.

Kopp says his bill would only bring the state in line with what is already well established federal policy with U.S. Supreme Court precedent.

“This bill would officially end an era of colonial thinking,” Kopp says, and would help repair a broken relationship with people who have lived in Alaska for millennia and long self-governed themselves.

11:26 a.m.

The House passed a motion which would give the Legislative Council, a bipartisan joint committee, the authority to close the Alaska State Capitol until further notice.

Rep. Ivy Spohnholz, D-Anchorage, said this would not end public access to live-streams or other electronic coverage that allow the public to view and participate in the public process.

But another Anchorage Democrat, Chris Tuck, said this wasn’t the right time for such a move. People are already beginning to panic, he said, and the Capitol closing its doors would send the wrong message.

Rep. David Eastman, R-Wasilla, attempted to add an amendment which would set an end date to the motion. Currently the motion has no end date. But as House Speaker Bryce Edgmon, I-Dillingham, noted, the motion was simply to give Legislative Council decision making power over the matter. Eastman’s amendment failed however.

11:23 a.m.

Today the House will debate a bill which would have the state government officially recognize Alaska’s 229 already federally recognized tribes.

House Bill 221, sponsored by Anchorage Republican Chuck Kopp, already have 19 Democratic and Independent co-sponsors already giving it 20 votes. It needs 21 to pass.

The bill would be largely symbolic, Richard Chalyee Éesh Peterson, president of the Central Council of Tlingit and Haida Indian Tribes of Alaska previously told the Empire. But that symbolism would go a long way to heal the often fraught relationship between tribal and American government entities.

“Just a simple act of recognition can heal decades of hurt,” Peterson told the Empire in February. “One of the things that will happen for the larger community of Alaska, this will normalize the thought of tribes as sovereigns.”

More in News

This undated electron microscope image made available by the U.S. National Institutes of Health in February 2020 shows the Novel Coronavirus SARS-CoV-2, yellow, emerging from the surface of cells, blue/pink, cultured in the lab. Also known as 2019-nCoV, the virus causes COVID-19. THE CANADIAN PRESS/AP, NIAID-RML
COVID at a Glance for Thursday, Dec. 2

Numbers come from reports from the City and Borough of Juneau Emergency… Continue reading

A man missing for more than 40 years was identified by the Alaska Bureau of Investigation as a Chugiak resident who was last seen in 1979 before being discovered murdered years before on an island near Anchorage in 1989. (Courtesy photo / Alaska Department of Public Safety)
Body found in ’80s ID’d with DNA analysis

The body, found in 1989, had been unidentified until now.

teaser
Planet Alaska: Visiting the ancestors through glimpses of glyphs

We live in Tlingit Aaní on Kaachxaan.akw’w where our petroglyphs are a symbol of home.

It's a police car until you look closely and see the details don't quite match. (Juneau Empire File / Michael Penn)
Police calls for Thursday, Dec. 2, 2021

This report contains public information from law enforcement and public safety agencies.

This undated electron microscope image made available by the U.S. National Institutes of Health in February 2020 shows the Novel Coronavirus SARS-CoV-2, yellow, emerging from the surface of cells, blue/pink, cultured in the lab. Also known as 2019-nCoV, the virus causes COVID-19. THE CANADIAN PRESS/AP, NIAID-RML
COVID at a Glance for Wednesday, Dec. 1

Numbers come from reports from the City and Borough of Juneau Emergency… Continue reading

This undated electron microscope image made available by the U.S. National Institutes of Health in February 2020 shows the Novel Coronavirus SARS-CoV-2, yellow, emerging from the surface of cells, blue/pink, cultured in the lab. Also known as 2019-nCoV, the virus causes COVID-19. THE CANADIAN PRESS/AP, NIAID-RML
COVID at a Glance for Tuesday, Nov. 30

Numbers come from reports from the City and Borough of Juneau Emergency… Continue reading

The Pebble deposit lies at the headwaters of Bristol Bay, the greatest salmon fishery in the world. (Courtesy Photo / Colin Arisman)
Pride of Bristol Bay: Permanent protections in view for Bristol Bay

By Bjorn Dihle For more than two decades, those who care about… Continue reading

It's a police car until you look closely and see the details don't quite match. (Juneau Empire File / Michael Penn)
Police calls for Wednesday, Dec. 1, 2021

This report contains public information from law enforcement and public safety agencies.

This photo shows a raven in the snow. (Courtesy Photo / Kerry Howard)
On the Trails: Transition to winter — maybe

A mat of old leaves lined the roadway, each leaf fringed with crystals, making a pretty mosaic…

Most Read