Briefs: SHI sponsors series, Coastal CODE, Museum Day, Princess Sophia author talk

Briefs: SHI sponsors series, Coastal CODE, Museum Day, Princess Sophia author talk

Capital City Weekly news briefs for Sept. 12-18, 2018.

Princess Sophia book author to speak at State Museum

Ken Coates, co-author of “The Sinking of the Princess Sophia: Taking the North Down with Her,” will share insights about the 1918 shipwreck, at the Father Andrew P. Kashevaroff State Library, Archives, and Museum on Thursday, Sept. 13, at 5:30 p.m. His talk will be recorded for later broadcast on 360 North and online at https://www.360north.org/at-the-apk/.

The presentation is part of this year’s summer lecture series relating to the exhibit, “Titanic of the North: The 1918 Wreck of the S.S. Princess Sophia,” at the Alaska State Museum. The final lecture in the series will be on Saturday, Sept. 22, with author Mary Ehrlander, whose new book, “Walter Harper: Alaska Native Son,” profiles one of the victims of the Princess Sophia disaster. The exhibit is on display through Saturday, Oct. 6. For other Princess Sophia events occurring around town, visit http://www.rememberthesophia.org/calendar.html.

SHI to sponsor cultural orientation series for educators

Sealaska Heritage Institute is recruiting teachers and education administrators in the Juneau School District for its fall 2018 cultural orientation program.

The program, Thru the Cultural Lens, is a cultural-connectedness project for educators and pays a stipend to participants who complete the seminars.

“Research has shown that Native culturally-responsive programs are associated with improved academic performance, decreased dropout rates and improved school attendance,” said SHI President Rosita Worl in a press release. “The more that teachers understand the Native worldview, the better they are able to serve our children.”

The fall program will offer 32 hours of cultural orientation through four seminars in September and October. SHI will accept eight secondary-level educators and current or incoming school board members who have not participated in previous SHI cultural-orientation seminars. SHI is seeking additional funds to expand the program to other Southeast Alaska communities.

Educators may register at https://tinyurl.com/yb6a5qkt.

For more information, contact rachael.carlson@sealaska.com or phyllis.carlson@sealaska.com.

Alaska Brewing’s Coastal CODE Grant deadline is Sept. 30

Alaskan Brewing’s Coastal CODE (Clean Oceans Depend on Everyone) supports organizations and activities that promote the health of oceans and waterways by providing grants to nonprofits and sponsoring cleanup efforts throughout Alaska and the West Coast.

“We have grown our cleanup efforts substantially over the eleven years since the Coastal CODE program was established,” said Rochelle Lindley, Alaskan Brewing’s Coastal CODE Committee Chairwoman.

One percent of Icy Bay IPA sales goes toward funding the program, which then issues grant money to organizations and projects that promote cleanup activities or habitat restoration.

More information about the grant proposal process can be found at https://alaskanbeer.com/community/. Interested organizations can apply for Coastal CODE grants by emailing info@alaskanbeer.com.

The deadline for 2018 Coastal CODE grant applications is Sept. 30.

Museum Day and Book Signing with Mary Ehrlander at the City Museum

Author Mary Ehrlander will be signing copies of her book, “Walter Harper: Alaska Native Son,” at the City Museum on Sept. 22 from 10:30 a.m.-noon. Coffee will be provided thanks to a donation from Heritage Coffee Company. Sept. 22 is also Museum Day and admission to the Juneau-Douglas City Museum, 114 West 4th St., will be free all day. Copies of “Walter Harper: Alaska Native Son” will be available for purchase in the museum store. Following the book signing, Ehrlander will give an author’s talk at the Father Andrew P. Kashevaroff State Libraries, Archives, and Museum from 2-3 p.m. The program will be recorded for later broadcast on 360 North and on the web at www.360north.org/at-the-apk.

This event is co-sponsored by the Alaska State Library and Collections, the Juneau-Douglas City Museum and the Juneau Public Libraries as part of The Great American Read. Programming for The Great American Read is offered as part of a grant from the American Library Association and PBS.

More in News

(Juneau Empire file photo)
Aurora forecast for the week of April 15

These forecasts are courtesy of the University of Alaska Fairbanks’ Geophysical Institute… Continue reading

(Michael Penn / Juneau Empire file photo)
Police calls for Tuesday, April 16, 2024

This report contains public information from law enforcement and public safety agencies.

An illustration depicts a planned 12-acre education campus located on 42 acres in Juneau owned by the Central Council of the Tlingit and Haida Indian Tribes of Alaska, which was announced during the opening of its annual tribal assembly Wednesday. (Image courtesy of the Central Council of the Tlingit and Haida Indian Tribes of Alaska)(Image courtesy of the Central Council of the Tlingit and Haida Indian Tribes of Alaska)
Tribal education campus, cultural immersion park unveiled as 89th annual Tlingit and Haida Assembly opens

State of the Tribe address emphasizes expanding geographical, cultural and economic “footprint.”

In an undated image provided by Ken Hill/National Park Service, Alaska, the headwaters of the Ambler River in the Noatak National Preserve of Alaska, near where a proposed access road would end. The Biden administration is expected to deny permission for a mining company to build a 211-mile industrial road through fragile Alaskan wilderness, handing a victory to environmentalists in an election year when the president wants to underscore his credentials as a climate leader and conservationist. (Ken Hill/National Park Service, Alaska via The New York Times)
Biden’s Interior Department said to reject industrial road through Alaskan wilderness

The Biden administration is expected to deny permission for a mining company… Continue reading

An aerial view of downtown Juneau. (Clarise Larson / Juneau Empire file photo)
Task force to study additional short-term rental regulations favored by Juneau Assembly members

Operator registration requirement that took effect last year has 79% compliance rate, report states.

Cheer teams for Thunder Mountain High School and Juneau-Douglas High School: Yadaa.at Kalé perform a joint routine between quarters of a Feb. 24 game between the girls’ basketball teams of both schools. It was possibly the final such local matchup, with all high school students scheduled to be consolidated into JDHS starting during the next school year. (Mark Sabbatini / Juneau Empire file photo)
State OKs school district’s consolidation plan; closed schools cannot reopen for at least seven years

Plans from color-coded moving boxes to adjusting bus routes well underway, district officials say.

Snow falls on the Alaska Capitol and the statue of William Henry Seward on Monday, April 1. (James Brooks/Alaska Beacon)
Alaska’s carbon storage bill, once a revenue measure, is now seen as boon for oil and coal

Last year, when Gov. Mike Dunleavy proposed legislation last year to allow… Continue reading

(Michael Penn / Juneau Empire file photo)
Police calls for Monday, April 15, 2024

This report contains public information from law enforcement and public safety agencies.

Juneau’s Recycling Center and Household Hazardous Waste Facility at 5600 Tonsgard Court. (City and Borough of Juneau photo)
Recycleworks stops accepting dropoffs temporarily due to equipment failure

Manager of city facility hopes operations can resume by early next week

Most Read