The Captain Cook, one of two tour boats formerly operated by Adventure Bound Alaska, in Aurora Harbor prior to a scheduled sealed-bid auction for vessels that has been extended until April 10. (City and Borough of Juneau)

The Captain Cook, one of two tour boats formerly operated by Adventure Bound Alaska, in Aurora Harbor prior to a scheduled sealed-bid auction for vessels that has been extended until April 10. (City and Borough of Juneau)

Auction of Adventure Bound boats gets delay, big minimum bid increase due to liens

Two vessels from troubled tour company now selling for several times the original listed bids.

The good news is people interested in buying one of the two boats from the beleaguered Adventure Bound Alaska tour company have a couple of extra weeks to submit sealed auction bids. The bad news is that’s because the minimum bids had to be increased massively due to liens placed on the vessels.

The company’s 56-foot-long Adventure Bound vessel had a minimum bid of $8,815.68 when originally listed March 15, but on March 27 that was increased to $32,985.68. The 65-foot-long Captain Cook originally listed with a minimum bid of $10,180.69 was increased to $53,520.33.

The original bid deadline of March 27 has been extended until 2 p.m. April 10, according to an auction notice for both vessels published on the City and Borough of Juneau’s harbors Facebook page. Bids will be opened immediately at that time.

The original minimums were to cover payments due to the city, but harbor staff recently learned there are liens on the vessels as well, Harbormaster Matthew Creswell said Thursday.

“Per our policy, the liens have to get paid as well,” he said. “So once we were made aware of those liens we extended the auction by two weeks and included those liens into the minimum bid.”

Adventure Bound Alaska, which began operating in Juneau 33 years ago, became the target of complaints from people who said they booked and prepaid for trips not provided starting in mid-2022 and continuing well into 2023. Also, Petro 49 sued the company, and its owners, Steven and Winona Weber, for nearly $20,000 in unpaid bills, and Steve Weber was given four notices of deficiencies by the U.S. Coast Guard resulting from a grounding incident in Canadian waters in October of 2022.

The auction for the vessels is by local regulation an in-person process where sealed bids are submitted to the harbormaster’s office at 1600 Harbor Way, in contrast to items such as vehicles impounded by the Juneau Police Department that are sold via a public surplus auction online. Creswell said if nobody offers the minimum bid by the new deadline for one or both vessels the next step will be a public surplus auction.

“I don’t think what I have to do in this case,” he said. However, “once we go to that procedure we can set the minimum bids to whatever we want. But we would still include that lien cost in that minimum bid.”

If and when the vessels are sold, the lien holder is paid first, Creswell said. Any remaining funds after the city deducts the money it’s owed would go to the vessels’ former owners. The Webers can also reclaim the vessels by paying the money owed to CBJ by April 9, although the liens would still be in effect.

• Contact Mark Sabbatini at mark.sabbatini@juneauempire.com or (907) 957-2306.

More in News

(Juneau Empire file photo)
Aurora forecast for the week of April 15

These forecasts are courtesy of the University of Alaska Fairbanks’ Geophysical Institute… Continue reading

(Michael Penn / Juneau Empire file photo)
Police calls for Sunday, April 14, 2024

This report contains public information from law enforcement and public safety agencies.

TJ Beers holds a sign to advocate for the rights of people experiencing homelessness outside the state Capitol on April 9. Beers was homeless for four years and in three states. “I don’t know how I survived,” he said. (Claire Stremple/Alaska Beacon)
Lawmakers weigh whether to reduce or acknowledge rights of growing Alaska homeless population

As cities try to house people, Dunleavy’s protest bill would further criminalize them, advocates say.

(Michael Penn / Juneau Empire file photo)
Police calls for Saturday, April 13, 2024

This report contains public information from law enforcement and public safety agencies.

(Michael Penn / Juneau Empire file photo)
Police calls for Friday, April 12, 2024

This report contains public information from law enforcement and public safety agencies.

(Michael Penn / Juneau Empire file photo)
Police calls for Thursday, April 11, 2024

This report contains public information from law enforcement and public safety agencies.

The sky and mountains are reflected in the water on April 5, 2012, at the Kootznoowoo Wilderness in the Tongass National Forest’s Admiralty Island National Monument. Conservation organizations bought some private land and transferred it to the U.S. Forest Service, resulting in an incremental expansion of the Kootznoowoo Wilderness and protection of habitat important to salmon and wildlife. (Photo by Don MacDougall/U.S. Forest Service)
Conservation groups’ purchase preserves additional land in Alaska’s Tongass National Forest

A designated wilderness area in Southeast Alaska’s Tongass National Forest, the largest… Continue reading

A welcome sign is shown Sept. 22, 2021, in Tok. President Joe Biden won Alaska’s nominating contest on Saturday. (AP Photo/Rick Bowmer, File)
Biden wins more delegates in Alaska and Wyoming as he heads toward Democratic nomination

President Joe Biden nudged further ahead in the Democratic nomination for reelection… Continue reading

Juneau Assembly members and other visitors examine a meeting room formerly used by the nine-member Alaska State Board of Education and Early Development on Monday, April 8, which is about 25% larger than the Assembly Chambers at City Hall. (Mark Sabbatini / Juneau Empire)
Of three possible new City Hall buildings, one stands out — but plenty of proposed uses for other two

Michael J. Burns Building eyed as city HQ; childcare, animal shelter among options at school sites.

Most Read