Carlie Friedrichs, 5, works on twisting material into the shape of a person at the Alaska action figure station at the Alaska State Library Archives and Museum’s free Family Fair Friday, Jan.4, 2019. (Ben Hohenstatt | Capital City Weekly)

Carlie Friedrichs, 5, works on twisting material into the shape of a person at the Alaska action figure station at the Alaska State Library Archives and Museum’s free Family Fair Friday, Jan.4, 2019. (Ben Hohenstatt | Capital City Weekly)

Alaska State Library, Archives and Museum Family Fair draws a crowd

Hundreds of kids, parents atended the event

Hundreds of children and their adults flocked to the Alaska State Library, Archives and Museum Friday.

The Father Andrew P. Kashevaroff Building was the site of a free Family Fair, and just before 3 p.m., organizers put the headcount at about 110 kids and 90 adults with more filing in. The event began at 1 p.m.

“I thought what a nice thing to do on a holiday vacation,” said Lolita Edgar, who was in attendance with her grandchildren. “We were here when it first opened, and I thought it was about time we came back. “

Organizers said attendance seemed to be up slightly from last year’s fair.

The Family Fair utilized all parts of the Alaska State Library, Archives and Museum, not just the attention-grabbing museum exhibits.

Children such as 9-year-old Troy Edgar were able to pose in projections of Division of Tourism photos from the Alaska State Archives.

Edgar opted to slide his face into a photo of a mountain climber. Other options included a fisher, dancers, skiers and more.

Other children such as 2-year-old Raymond Howard tried their hand at writing using quill pens in the library, which was also the site of story time.

The nearby research center offered the chance for children to make origami resembling Alaska animals such as puffins, rabbits, foxes, swans and frogs.

Downstairs, there were a number of arts and crafts projects for kids.

They twisted pipe-cleaner-esque materials to make humanoid Alaska action figures, which were then adorned with parkas and snowshoes made at subsequent stations and Alaska yo-yos, which were two pom-poms attached to yarn that children twirled.

“It just seemed like fun,” said Heather Paige as her 3-year-old son Benny toddled quickly toward his recently made yo-yo.


• Contact arts and culture reporter Ben Hohenstatt at (907)523-2243 or bhohenstatt@juneauempire.com.


Wren Mesdag, 4, finishes up an origami whale during the Family Fair Friday, Jan.4, 2019. One of the stations at the event allowed children to fold paper into shapes resembling Alaskan animals. (Ben Hohenstatt | Capital City Weekly)

Wren Mesdag, 4, finishes up an origami whale during the Family Fair Friday, Jan.4, 2019. One of the stations at the event allowed children to fold paper into shapes resembling Alaskan animals. (Ben Hohenstatt | Capital City Weekly)

Benny Burke, 3, watches his Alaskan yo-yo get made after selecting a bead during the Family Fair Friday at the Alaska State Library, Archives and Museum, Jan.4, 2019. (Ben Hohenstatt | Capital City Weekly)

Benny Burke, 3, watches his Alaskan yo-yo get made after selecting a bead during the Family Fair Friday at the Alaska State Library, Archives and Museum, Jan.4, 2019. (Ben Hohenstatt | Capital City Weekly)

Lolita Edgar snaps a photo of her grandson, Troy Edgar, 9, during the Family Fair Friday, Jan.4, 2019. (Ben Hohenstatt | Capital City Weekly)

Lolita Edgar snaps a photo of her grandson, Troy Edgar, 9, during the Family Fair Friday, Jan.4, 2019. (Ben Hohenstatt | Capital City Weekly)

Raymond Howard, 2, tries writing with a quill during the Family Fair Friday, Jan.4, 2019. (Ben Hohenstatt | Capital City Weekly)

Raymond Howard, 2, tries writing with a quill during the Family Fair Friday, Jan.4, 2019. (Ben Hohenstatt | Capital City Weekly)

Families mingle on the first floor of the Alaska State Library, Archives and Museum during the Family Fair Friday, Jan.4, 2019. (Ben Hohenstatt | Capital City Weekly)

Families mingle on the first floor of the Alaska State Library, Archives and Museum during the Family Fair Friday, Jan.4, 2019. (Ben Hohenstatt | Capital City Weekly)

More in News

Jasmine Chavez, a crew member aboard the Quantum of the Seas cruise ship, waves to her family during a cell phone conversation after disembarking from the ship at Marine Park on May 10. (Mark Sabbatini / Juneau Empire file photo)
Ships in port for the week of May 18

Here’s what to expect this week.

Dave Scanlan, general manager of Eaglecrest Ski Area, speaks to the City and Borough of Juneau Assembly Finance Committee on April 13, 2023. (Clarise Larson / Juneau Empire file photo)
Dave Scanlan forced out as Eaglecrest’s general manager, says decision ‘came as a complete shock to me’

Resort’s leader for past 7 years says board seeking a “more office-process, paper-oriented” manager.

The entrance to the Alaska Gasline Development Corp.’s Anchorage office is seen on Aug. 11, 2023. The state-owned AGDC is pushing for a massive project that would ship natural gas south from the North Slope, liquefy it and send it on tankers from Cook Inlet to Asian markets. The AGDC proposal is among many that have been raised since the 1970s to try commercialize the North Slope’s stranded natural gas. (Yereth Rosen/Alaska Beacon)
Eight young Alaskans sue to block proposed trans-Alaska natural gas pipeline

Plaintiffs cite climate change that harms their access to fish, wildlife and natural resources.

(Michael Penn / Juneau Empire file photo)
Police calls for Tuesday, May 21, 2024

This report contains public information from law enforcement and public safety agencies.

A Shell station in Anchorage. (Nathaniel Herz/Northern Journal)
Shell abandons North Slope oil leases, raising questions about the industry’s future in Alaska

Experts say some of the state’s hard-to-tap oil prospects are becoming less attractive.

Tom Abbas discusses the hose his boat needs as shop owner and vintage halibut jacket provider Jim Geraghty shows his customer the options. Racks of dry-cleaned woolen jackets hang among the marine supply aisles in Gerahgty’s Lemon Creek business. (Laurie Craig / Juneau Empire)
Coats of many colors: Halibut jackets make a big splash again

“Pre-owned” wool garments from many decades ago being tracked down for resale by Juneau marine shop.

(Michael Penn / Juneau Empire file photo)
Police calls for Monday, May 20, 2024

This report contains public information from law enforcement and public safety agencies.

The Columbia state ferry sails through Lynn Canal on Monday, April 29, 2019. (Alex McCarthy / Juneau Empire file photo)
Columbia ferry out of service until end of the year

51-year-old ship has been out of service since November; corrosion in fire system cited for delay.

Most Read