Ch’áak’ Aanyádi” (The High Caste Eagle) by Jerrod Galanin won Best of Show and Best of Carving and Sculpture Category in Sealaska Heritage Institute’s 2020 Juried Art Competition. (Courtesy Photo | SHI)

Ch’áak’ Aanyádi” (The High Caste Eagle) by Jerrod Galanin won Best of Show and Best of Carving and Sculpture Category in Sealaska Heritage Institute’s 2020 Juried Art Competition. (Courtesy Photo | SHI)

‘Stunning’ piece wins Best of Show in Juried Art Competition

Sealaska Heritage Institute announces winners.

Eighteen artists won top prizes and honorable mentions at Sealaska Heritage Institute’s 10th biennial Juried Art Show and Competition.

The art show was part of this year’s virtual Celebration. Jurors reviewed the pieces blindly, meaning the names of artists who submitted pieces were not disclosed. The show along with exemplary pieces are featured in an an online exhibit.

Tlingit artist Jerrod Galanin won Best of Show for “Ch’áak’ Aanyádi” (The High Caste Eagle), a copper grease bowl with an Eagle design, according to a news release from Sealaska Heritage Institute.

In a written statement, jurors Deborah Head, or Aanutein, and art historian Steve Henrikson stated the formline design was expertly designed and beautifully engraved.

“The coloring/patina of the metal is innovative and is an appealing attribute,” they wrote. “Angles are nice and flowing. The treated copper has a stunning effect.”

Clifton Guthrie won Best of Formline for his drum “Connections,” which the jurors said had “some unusual aspects to some formline elements (u-forms and the Frog face inside the Raven head), which make the whole more complex and challenging.”

Elaine Jack won the President’s Award, a category new to the competition this year, for her “Beaded Chilkat Wall Hanging.”

“Beaded Chilkat Wall Hanging” by Elaine Jack won the newly created President’s Award in Sealaska Heritage Institute’s 2020 Juried Art Competition. (Courtesy Photo | SHI)

“Beaded Chilkat Wall Hanging” by Elaine Jack won the newly created President’s Award in Sealaska Heritage Institute’s 2020 Juried Art Competition. (Courtesy Photo | SHI)

SHI President Rosita Worl called Jack’s piece “a unique and extraordinary piece of artwork that represents and embodies the highest standards of the Northwest Coast art tradition,” in a release.

All award winners by division

Carving and Sculpture Division (metal, wood and other media categories): Jerrod Galanin won Best of Show and Best of Metal Category for Ch’áak’ Aanyádi (The High Caste Eagle); James Johnson won Best of Wood Category for “Kéet S’áaxu”; Michael Beasley won Best of Other Media Category for “Mother Wheel”; Lee Burkhart won Best of Division for “Copper Bent Box”; and an Honorable Mention for “Spirit Man.”

2D and Relief Carving Division (paintings, relief carving and print making categories): Clifton Guthrie won Best of Formline and Best of Painting Category for “Connections”; Kenneth White won Best of Division for “Cape Fox Lodge Panel”; and James Johnson won an Honorable Mention for “T’óos’ Sankeit.”

Sewing Division (beadwork, regalia and skin and fur categories): Elaine Jack won the President’s Award, Best of Sewing Division and Best of Beadwork Category for “Beaded Chilkat Wall Hanging”; Harold Jacobs won Best of Regalia Category for his ermine skin headdress “Dáa Doogú Shadaa”; Davina Cole won Best of Skin and Fur Category for her “Seal Skin ‘Paper Boy’ Hat”; and Christy Ruby won an Honorable Mention for her sea otter capelet “Taa Daa.”

Weaving (Chilkat-inspired, Ravenstail and basketry categories): Marlene Liddle won Best of Division and Best of Basketry Category for “Imitation Abalone”; Patrizia Fiorella won Best of Chilkat-Inspired Category for “Chilkat Tunic Fringe Gorget”; Ursala (Kadusné) Hudson won Best of Ravenstail Category for “Tidal”; and Lily Hope won an honorable mention for “Taku Sunrise.”

Endangered Art Division (spruce root basketry and horn spoon categories): Marlene Liddle won Best of Division for “Small Spruce Root Basket”; Jennifer Younger and Jennie Wheeler won Best of Spruce Root Category for “Moon Shadow Basket”; Andrew Tripp won Best of Horn Spoon Category for “Sharing Wealth”; and Austin Tagaban won an Honorable Mention for “Hudson Bay Border Design Bottle.”

Other pieces selected for exhibit

These pieces included “Crabs in a Bucket” by Alison Bremner; “Eagle Human Bear” by Timber Vavalis; “Chilkat Collage 1” by Lily Hope; “Deisheetaan Shaawádi” by Andrew Tripp; “First Celebration Rattle” by Andrew Tripp; “Kéet Kootéeyaa or Transforming Killer Whale” by Herb Sheakley; “Lékwaa Kaséikh’w” by Herb Sheakley; “Ch’áak’ S’áaxu” by James Johnson; “Safe Keeper” by Amy Tessaro; “Ocean Traveler” by Amy Tessaro; “Kaagwaantaan Beaded Vest” by Chuck Miller; “Little Watchman” by Lily Hope; “Ravenstail Apron and Leggings” by Davina Cole; “A Look into the Past” by Marry Knutsen; “Beach Asparagus” by Vicki Soboleff; “Little Dancer” by Vicki Soboleff; “Haida Spiderweb Basket” by Austin Tagaban; and “Studying Basket” by Ariane Xay Kuyaas Medley.

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