Derek St Clair aims at a target during the Juneau Gun Club’s annual Turkey Shoot on Nov. 20, 2021. (Michael S. Lockett / Juneau Empire)

Derek St Clair aims at a target during the Juneau Gun Club’s annual Turkey Shoot on Nov. 20, 2021. (Michael S. Lockett / Juneau Empire)

Shooters shoot: Juneau Gun Club brings back Turkey Shoot

Juneau residents came out firing for the annual event.

The Juneau Gun Club brought back its annual Turkey Shoot Saturday morning as Juneau residents stood tall and let fly at a variety of targets.

The event, canceled last year, was smaller than previous years without the indoor range portion, but dozens still came out despite frigid temperatures.

“My kids, this is the first time they’ve done the Turkey Shoot,” said Casey Walker, who came out for the event. “It’s a great thing for kids to be out learning to shoot responsibly. I just took my son out deer hunting for the first time yesterday.”

Shooters prepare to fire at a target during the Juneau Gun Club’s annual Turkey Shoot on Nov. 20, 2021. (Michael S. Lockett / Juneau Empire)

Shooters prepare to fire at a target during the Juneau Gun Club’s annual Turkey Shoot on Nov. 20, 2021. (Michael S. Lockett / Juneau Empire)

The Turkey Shoot has been occurring since at least the ‘70s, said Jerry Godkin, gun club president.

“It’s a family event versus just club shooters,” Godkin said in an interview. “We try to get something we can do for the public.”

While the club has public shoot days on Sunday afternoons and Wednesday evenings, Godkin said, the Turkey Shoot is its largest event for the public held at the club’s Montana Creek range, next to the indoor shooting range.

[Juneau reaches out helping hand for Thanksgiving]

“What’s amazing is, you get people who get here and say, ‘I didn’t even know this was here,’” Godkin said. “With the COVID and the temperatures out today, I’d be hopeful to get 80 to 100 people.”

While the club sometimes procures nearly 100 turkeys as prizes, Godkin said, this year, without the indoor range in rotation, they reduced that significantly. Shooters competed at multiple distances in different competitions for the chance to eliminate other competitors and win turkeys. Mitigation measures also meant that many of the organizer tables went outside as a result, instead of being inside the clubhouse.

“There’s been years we gave away 80 turkeys. This year, we only got 40,” Godkin said. “We didn’t know if we could get turkeys for a reasonable price, We ended up getting turkeys from Costco.”

Shooters toe the line during the Juneau Gun Club’s annual Turkey Shoot at their range on Nov. 20, 2021. (Michael S. Lockett / Juneau Empire)

Shooters toe the line during the Juneau Gun Club’s annual Turkey Shoot at their range on Nov. 20, 2021. (Michael S. Lockett / Juneau Empire)

They also got turkeys and gift cards for prizes from Foodland and Super Bear IGA, Godkin said, thanking the supermarkets. While the gun club probably wasn’t doing much better than breaking even on the event, Godkin said, it was good to get members of the public of all ages out again.

“At the Juneau Gun Club, your kid can be a full-fledged member,” Godkin said. “They’re a part of things. That’s why I like it, it’s open to all ages.”

For many members, membership in the JCG is multigenerational, said Marie Lam, who was helping to organize the event.

“We’re members because our kids are members,” Lam said while organizing relays of shooters.

About 20 volunteers came out to help run the event, Lam said.

“What I’m impressed about is the number of helpers we got. It’s hard to pull off an event like this without them,” Godkin said. “We had our annual meeting in mid-October and we were worried we wouldn’t have enough workers.”

The JGC’s next major event is the Winter League, where teams will square off in multiple divisions over several ranges to out shoot everyone else. People interested in participating can contact Juneau Gun Club at (907) 789-9844.

• Contact reporter Michael S. Lockett at (757) 621-1197 or mlockett@juneauempire.com.

More in News

Jasmine Chavez, a crew member aboard the Quantum of the Seas cruise ship, waves to her family during a cell phone conversation after disembarking from the ship at Marine Park on May 10. (Mark Sabbatini / Juneau Empire file photo)
Ships in port for the week of May 18

Here’s what to expect this week.

Juneau high school seniors Edward Hu of Juneau-Douglas High School: Yadaa.at Kalé (left), Elizabeth Djajalie of Thunder Mountain High School (center) and Kenyon Jordan of Yaaḵoosgé Daakahídi Alternative High School. (Photos of Hu and Jordan by Juneau Empire staff, photo of Djajalie by Victor Djajalie)
Senior Spotlight 2024: Three top students take very different paths to graduation stage

Ceremonies for Juneau’s three high schools take place Sunday.

The entrance road to Bartlett Regional Hospital. (Peter Segall / Juneau Empire file photo)
Bartlett Regional Hospital looking at eliminating or trimming six ‘non-core’ programs to stabilize finances

Rainforest Recovery Center, autism therapy, crisis stabilization, hospice among programs targeted.

A king salmon. (Ryan Hagerty/U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service)
Biden administration advances bid to list Gulf of Alaska king salmon as endangered or threatened

Experts say request could restrict activity affecting river habitats such as road, home construction

Mayor Beth Weldon (left), Deputy Mayor Michelle Bonnet Hale and Juneau Assembly member Paul Kelly discussion proposals for next year’s mill rate during an Assembly Finance Committee meeting on Wednesday night. (Mark Sabbatini / Juneau Empire)
Assembly members support lower 10.04 mill rate ahead of final vote on next year’s CBJ budget

Initial proposal called for raising current rate of 10.16 mills to 10.32 mills.

Dave Scanlan, general manager of Eaglecrest Ski Area, speaks to the City and Borough of Juneau Assembly Finance Committee on April 13, 2023. (Clarise Larson / Juneau Empire file photo)
Dave Scanlan forced out as Eaglecrest’s general manager, says decision ‘came as a complete shock to me’

Resort’s leader for past 7 years says board seeking a “more office-process, paper-oriented” manager.

The entrance to the Alaska Gasline Development Corp.’s Anchorage office is seen on Aug. 11, 2023. The state-owned AGDC is pushing for a massive project that would ship natural gas south from the North Slope, liquefy it and send it on tankers from Cook Inlet to Asian markets. The AGDC proposal is among many that have been raised since the 1970s to try commercialize the North Slope’s stranded natural gas. (Yereth Rosen/Alaska Beacon)
Eight young Alaskans sue to block proposed trans-Alaska natural gas pipeline

Plaintiffs cite climate change that harms their access to fish, wildlife and natural resources.

(Michael Penn / Juneau Empire file photo)
Police calls for Tuesday, May 21, 2024

This report contains public information from law enforcement and public safety agencies.

Most Read